Honoring the U.S. Service Members Who Died in November 2016

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We lost a number of U.S. service members in November 2016. We want to honor those who died in combat and honor those who did not, both overseas and in garrison.

O God, by whose mercy the faithful departed find rest, look kindly on your departed veterans who gave their lives in the service of their country. Grant that through the passion, death, and resurrection of your Son they may share in the joy of your heavenly kingdom and rejoice in you with your saints forever. We ask this through Christ our Lord. –Catholic Online

U.S. Air Force
AMN Daniel Peregoy, Andersen AFB, Guam
SrA Travis Bennet, Andersen AFB, Guam
MSgt Greg Ramos, Andersen AFB, Guam

U.S. Army
Pvt. Wanya Bruns, Fort Hood, Texas
Pvt. Kevin Paulino, Fort Hood, Texas
Pvt. Dakota Stump, Fort Hood, Texas
Pfc. Tyler Iubelt, Fort Hood, Texas (Afghanistan)
Pfc. Shadow McClaine, Fort Campbell, Kentucky
Pfc. Thomas Snyder III, Fort Wainwright, Alaska
Pfc. David Winchester, Fort Bragg, NC
Spc. Phillip Cruz-Medellin, Fort Riley, KS
Spc. Korey James, Fort Hood, Texas
Spc. Ronald Murray, Jr., Fort Bliss, TX (Kuwait)
Sgt. John Perry, Fort Hood, Texas (Afghanistan)
Staff Sgt. Matthew Lewellen, Fort Campbell, KY (Jordan)
Staff Sgt. Kevin McEnroe, Fort Campbell, KY (Jordan)
Staff Sgt. James Moriarty, Fort Campbell, KY (Jordan)
Sgt. 1st Class Ryan Gloyer, Fort Carson, CO (Afghanistan)
Sgt. 1st Class Grant Shanaman, Fort Bragg, NC
Capt. Andrew Byers, Fort Carson, CO (Afghanistan)

U.S. Marine Corps
Recruit Zachary Boland, Parris Island, South Carolina

U.S. Navy
Midshipman Jason Jablonski, Naval Academy, Maryland
Senior Chief PO Scott Dayton, EOD, Virginia (Syria)

Sgt. John Perry, US Army, Died of Injuries Sustained from Suicide Bomber at Post-Veterans Day Fun Run on Secure Base in Bagram, Afghanistan (2016)

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Sgt. John Perry, US Army

Sgt. John Perry, 30, US Army, died of injuries sustained from an improvised explosive device in Bagram, Afghanistan on November 12, 2016. Sgt. Perry was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel on behalf of the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Sustainment Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas. Army soldier Pfc. Tyler Iubelt, 20, also died in the attack that occurred as people were gathering at the airfield for a post-Veterans Day fun run. Reports indicate that a Taliban suicide bomber was dressed as a laborer and blew himself up killing Sgt. Perry, Pfc. Iubelt, and two civilians.

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Army Casualties
Stockton soldier dies in blast
Soldier killed in Afghanistan went to high school in Chico
Soldier from Perry County, Illinois killed in Afghanistan
Stockton soldier one of two killed in Afghanistan
Stockton soldier killed in suicide bomber blast at U.S. base in Afghanistan
Family and friends mourn loss of local soldier
Friends Mourn Stockton Soldier Killed in Afghanistan
Two Fort Hood Soldiers Killed In Afghanistan
Two U.S. soldiers killed in Afghanistan, one from Illinois
1st Cav Soldiers Among 4 Americans Killed in Afghanistan
Unprecedented: Taliban Kills Two U.S. Soldiers in Heavily Fortified Afghan Base
Two U.S. soldiers killed by an IED at Bagram Airbase in Afghanistan during Veterans Day ‘fun run’
Scott AFB honors fallen U.S. soldier as remains return home to Illinois
Fallen Soldier from Stockton Honored for Heroism
Stockton ceremony honors local soldier killed in Afghanistan
Father of fallen soldier says plane passengers booed family
Family of slain Fort Hood soldier booed on flight as they traveled to get his remains
Gold Star family exiting plane to meet soldier’s remains is booed by first class passengers
Gold Star father urges compassion after airplane passengers boo family
Vets travel to Sacramento to meet father of soldier killed overseas
NCO killed in Afghanistan posthumously promoted, awarded Bronze Star
Jonathan Lubecky: Honoring Sergeant John W. Perry
Support the Perry Family

Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members

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Objective: Provide support to families who have lost loved ones to non combat death, homicide, and suicide. Prevent non combat death, homicide and suicide by providing an expedited transfer option to whistleblowers and those who feel like their lives may be in danger.

This is a small sample of the many soldiers that have died of non combat deaths, homicide, and suicide. It was hard for me to choose which ones to feature. Given the amount of families who have questioned a ruling of suicide while their loved one was serving in the US military, it’s fair to say that some suicide rulings should have a second look to determine if a homicide was ruled out. It’s important to note that if the cause of death is determined to be suicide, then the military never has to investigate again.

Brief overview of need for expedited transfers for whistleblowers in general:

John Needham and Adam Winfield had a lot in common: they both claim to have witnessed war crimes, one in Iraq, the other in Afghanistan. They both wanted to report the war crimes but didn’t feel safe doing so. They both admitted to feeling like they were set up to die or participate in the war crimes. The only difference: John’s parents were able to get him out of Iraq after he started deteriorating mentally. Adam’s parents were not able to get him out of Afghanistan and he was charged with war crimes after he was set up to participate. On the Dark Side of Al Doura and the Kill Team Movie are must sees because they show the similarity in the cases and reveal how an expedited transfer option could have helped them & saved innocent civilian lives. I included a history of crime at the bases they were stationed at to demonstrate that the crime simply follows them overseas.

John Needham, Army (2008):
Retired Army Pvt John Needham Beat Girlfriend Jacqwelyn Villagomez to Death, Then Died of Overdose on Painkillers Awaiting Murder Trial
An Inside Look at Toxic Leadership in the US Army: On the Dark Side in Al Doura, Iraq
On the Dark Side in Al Doura, Iraq on YouTube
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Fort Carson

Adam Winfield, Army (2010):
Army Soldier Adam Winfield Tried to Report War Crimes But Instead was Charged with War Crimes as Part of ‘The Kill Team’
PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Nominated for an Emmy
The Kill Team on Amazon Prime
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at JBLM

Would the expedited transfer option help prevent suicide or homicide in these cases?

Alyssa Peterson, Army (2003)

There were concerns that Alyssa committed suicide because she didn’t want to participate in war crimes like torture. Could her life have been saved if she felt like she had a way out? Did she commit suicide? Was homicide ruled out?

Gloria Davis, Denise Lannaman, & Marshall Gutierrez, Army (2006)

Reports indicate Gloria Davis, Army (2006) committed suicide hours after she provided names and testimony to CID investigators regarding soldiers involved in a bribery scheme in Kuwait. She was a witness to the crimes and a witness for the prosecution. Did she commit suicide? Was homicide ever considered? How could this have been prevented? She was one of 3 people in the same logistics group in Kuwait tied to the bribery scheme investigation that committed suicide. Both Denise Lannaman, Army (2006) and Lt. Col. Marshall Gutierrez, Army (2006) deaths were ruled suicides by the Army as well. Were any of these cases investigated as homicides? Did anyone question why three soldiers from Kuwait tied to one investigation killed themselves?

Suzanne Swift, Army (2006)

Suzanne refused to redeploy for a third time for fear that she would be raped or assaulted this time. She went AWOL instead & was jailed. Could this have been prevented if she had a way out of Fort Lewis? She hadn’t been raped or assaulted yet. She was trying to prevent it given the isolation in Iraq. Does the expedited transfer apply to sexual harassment situations where the offender(s) are escalating? How could we have prevented this? If you look at the history of violent crime at JBLM and in Iraq, you can clearly see why Suzanne Swift was fearful for her life. She chose life and jail over rape and murder.

Genesia Gresham, Navy (2007)

Genesia and Anamarie Camacho were victims of homicide in Bahrain. Genesia was said to have been in a casual relationship with the shooter at one point. Were there red flags prior to the murder? Was the shooters behavior escalating? Does domestic violence, harassment, and stalking qualify for an expedited transfer? Could this have been prevented if Genesia had a way out when she realized she may have been in danger? The killer was never jail but instead institutionalized for mental health issues.

Jennifer Valdivia, Navy (2007)

Jennifer was at the center of command investigation of abuse of prisoners in Bahrain. It was reported that she did not want to participate in war crimes yet was belittled, harassed, and abused by a supervisor if she didn’t do what he asked. If she had a way out, could this suicide have been prevented? Was it a suicide? Was it ever investigated as a homicide?

Kelsey Anderson, USAF (2011)

The Anderson family reported that Kelsey’s health deteriorated after she learned that she could not transfer or get out of the military while stationed at Andersen Air Force Base in Guam. Why did she want a transfer? Why did she want to get out of the military all of a sudden? Did something happen to make Kelsey feel the need to get out of Guam as quickly as possible? Her death was ruled a suicide. Could this have been prevented if she was allowed to transfer? The Air Force took her gun privileges away shortly after she got to Guam because of mental health concerns. They gave it back to her a month before she died.

Danny Chen, Army (2011)

Danny was being hazed and bullied by fellow soldiers in Afghanistan. Could his death have been prevented if he had a way out of this situation? Does the expedited transfer apply to scenarios where an individual is being hazed, harassed, and physically assaulted? Did Danny fear murder? How could this have been prevented so Danny didn’t feel like suicide was the only way out?

Ciara Durkin, Mass Army National Guard (2007)

Ciara found discrepancies in the finance office in Afghanistan & feared that she made enemies. She asked her family to investigate if anything happened to her while she was overseas. Could we have saved Ciara’s life if once she realized that crimes may have been committed, she could leave and then safely report? Ciara was a witness to crime yet had to remain in the setting. Do expedited transfers apply to those who want to report crimes yet cannot do so safely in an isolated location?

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I researched the non combat deaths of female soldiers in Iraq, Afghanistan and other areas. I was alarmed by what I learned. It appears that close to 30% of the deaths of female soldiers in Iraq alone are from homicide, suicide, or unknown causes. I am working on doing the same research for male soldiers but have been overwhelmed with the number of non combat deaths of male soldiers. I am starting with 2010 to 2016. Then will focus energy on 2001 to 2010.

Non Combat Death of Female Soldiers:
Iraq
Afghanistan
Other Areas

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There are many cold cases in the military. The Army has the most cold cases. This list is a small sample of the cold cases in the military. Each case has the same theme. The families feel like they can’t get cooperation from the military to figure out what happened to their loved one. The families are devastated by the loss and traumatized further by the indifference, lack of support, and bureaucracy. If the homicide occurred on a base, they have nowhere to turn but the military because of federal jurisdiction issues. Most civilian cold case investigators ask for other investigators to take a look at cases to give them a fresh set of eyes. New investigators can add additional expertise to help find answers and give families closure. Two must see documentaries highlighting some of the major issues with investigations in the military are The Tillman Story (Pat Tillman) and The Silent Truth (LaVena Johnson).

Cold Cases:
Gorden Hess, Army (1998)
Col Philip Shue (2003)
Lavena Johnson, Army (2005)
Keisha Morgan, Army (2006)
Tina Priest, Army (2006)
Kamisha Block, Army (2007)
Stacy Dryden, USMC (2008)
Blanca Luna, USAF (2008)
Cherie Morton, Navy (2008)
BG Thomas Tinsley, USAF (2008)
Anton Phillips, Army (2009)
Amy Seyboth-Tirador (2009)
Sean Wells, Army (2013)
Virginia Caballero, Army (2014)
Shadow McClaine, Army (2016) (body not recovered)

Cases Solved by NCIS Cold Case Squad:
Lt Verle Hartley, Navy (1982)
Andrew Muns, Navy (1968)

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Other Areas of Concern:
David Dickson, US Army (1984) Tracking criminal behavior world wide
Kathleen Lipscomb, USAF spouse (1986) Jurisdiction Issues
Walter Smith, USMC (2006) Use of PTSD defense/stigma
Jennifer Cole, Army (2008) Accountability/Investigations
Morganne McBeth, Army (2010) Sentencing/Negligent Homicide
Mikayla Bragg, Army (2011) Mental Health/Suicide/Personnel Records
Kelli Bordeaux, Army (2012) Sex offender registry/Army role
A List of Soldiers Targeted & Murdered for the SGLI
Army Vet Micah Johnson Responsible for Dallas Police Officer Shootings
6 Service Members Currently on Military Death Row at Leavenworth
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts

History of Homicide/Suicide on Military Bases:
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at US Military Bases

Recommendations:

  • Expand expedited transfer policy to include whistleblowers (war crimes, hazing, stalking, sex harassment, witnesses to crimes) in an effort to prevent homicide and suicide
  • Creation of cold case squads in the Army & Air Force to investigate homicide & suicide rulings
  • Centralized location for families to call to initiate an investigation of suicide ruling or cold cases, with mental health component
  • Official way to dispute findings of military investigators/medical examiners, ability to request a second independent investigation

The Feres Doctrine prevents soldiers and families from suing the Armed Forces to hold them accountable financially in an effort to force change. Therefore it only seems fair that we give families the support they need when they lose a loved one who is serving in the US military.

We need centralized databases so that records of criminal activity can be more readily tracked to prevent a violent criminal from escalating to homicide. The military is considered one team now and their criminal activity impacts service members in all branches and civilians in the US and other countries. Given the transient population and jurisdiction issues, it only makes sense to utilize the existing FBI national database in an effort to connect crimes committed on bases, overseas, deployed locations, and in the civilian jurisdictions here in the US. The overall goal is to prevent multiple victims and homicide.

Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at United States Military Bases

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*Research not complete.

My experiences as a victim of crime in the United States military inspired me to do the work I do today as a military justice policy analyst. Not only did I witness first hand how a predator operates but I witnessed multiple predator types in real time while serving my country. If these people committed these acts of crimes at work in the civilian world, they would have been in jail or I would have been rich after taking my employer to civil court. Well maybe not because the deck is stacked against the accuser but we do in fact have a civilian justice system that allows us to hold others accountable, while it simultaneously protects the due process rights of the accused. This cannot be said of the military justice system. There is no guarantee a military Commander will do anything with a crime report let alone process the felony crime effectively. We do not want a justice system where one man or woman decides whether to do nothing, give a non judicial punishment for a felony crime, or railroad the accused or accuser. We do want a justice system where we can hold our employer accountable without roadblocks from the Pentagon, Congress, and the Feres Doctrine. We cannot effectively tackle the violent crime issue in the military until the victims of crimes, like sexual assault and domestic violence, feel safe enough to report. Crime victims have expressed that they do not want to report crimes to a Commander for fear of retaliation. The Department of Defense admitted that of those of who did report the crime, 62% perceived that they faced retaliation. If service members felt safe enough to report, it could help us prevent homicide, suicide, and non combat death.

If we think about violent crime committed by military personnel compared to violent crime statistics in the United States (reference above graph), at first glance it appears the military has a homicide ‘issue’ among the ranks. Please see the below links for a sample of crime on some of the U.S. military bases. All military bases worldwide will eventually be included in this research. And the research for sexual assault, rape, domestic violence, and physical assault specifically has not been conducted yet either. Because the research is far from being complete, it is too early to make any assumptions so I will put the data in one place and let you come to your own conclusions. But if military crime mirrors civilian crime statistics, one can deduce that if the military has a lot of homicide, there is even more rape. Currently the number one concern in the military is a Commander’s ability to give a non judicial punishment for a felony crime. A Commander can bypass the courts martial process simply by punishing and/or discharging the accused with a preponderance of the evidence. This does nothing to protect our military personnel and the civilians who live near our bases in America and worldwide. Predators do not discriminate. They are just as likely to harm civilians as they are military personnel. They know their rights and they know that jurisdiction issues and lack of communication among law enforcement agencies will help prolong getting caught. We need to be one step ahead.

We can’t get real violent crime numbers for the military bases unless we include those who died of non combat deaths while they were deployed. Veterans Noonie Fortin and Ann Wright inspired me to initially look into the non combat deaths of female soldiers overseas because they observed the unusually high number of female soldiers who died of non combat deaths during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their chief concern was that although the military labels a non combat death as a suicide, there are suspicions that some female soldiers were murdered, like LaVena Johnson, Amy Tirador, and Ciara Durkin. I did the research on every single female soldier who died from non combat deaths overseas and their concerns are valid. My research on non combat deaths in Iraq alone revealed that roughly 30% of female soldiers died as a result of homicide, suicide, and other unknown causes. I am working on collecting the data for male soldiers who died from non combat related injuries in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other areas. I started with 2010 so we can get the most recent cases but I will go back to September 11, 2001 in the next phase of data collection. The first male soldier non combat death case I found in 2010 was an unsolved homicide. His name was SSG Anton Phillips and he was stabbed to death in Afghanistan. Further research in this area has uncovered that non combat deaths of male soldiers are just as prevalent.

Learn more:
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Bragg, North Carolina (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Campbell, Kentucky (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Carson, Colorado (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas
Violent Crime at Fort Wainwright, Alaska (US Army)
Violent Crime at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska
A List of Soldiers Targeted & Murdered for the Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance Benefits
Rep Nikki Tsongas & Rep Mike Turner Host Educational Caucus: Improving Treatment Resources for Male Survivors of Military Sexual Trauma
An Open Letter to the Senate and House of Representatives in Support of the Military Justice Improvement Act
Letter of Support for Save Our Heroes in Our Shared Quest for Military Justice Reform & Constitutional Rights

The PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Nominated for an Emmy

The Kill Team is a PBS documentary featuring the Joint Base Lewis-McChord soldiers in Washington who were involved in murdering innocent Afghanistan civilians on a deployment in 2010. The media came up with ‘The Kill Team’ designator to describe the actions of five Army soldiers specifically who were involved in this scandal. It turns out it wasn’t the scandal the media made it out to be after all yet all five soldiers featured in the media were sanctioned regardless. There were a total of eleven enlisted soldiers who were punished for their actions in Afghanistan. No Army leadership at the base were held accountable. The real scandals are the lack of oversight in Afghanistan, the lack of accountability for leadership, and the broken military justice system. This film clearly shows how the military justice system operates differently then the civilian justice system. If you want to learn more about how military justice works, watch this film. This film depicted the toxic leadership in the ‘Platoon from Hell’ and the dangers of being a whistleblower in the US Army. The Kill Team was nominated for an Emmy by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The Kill Team is now available for purchase on I-Tunes, Amazon Prime, Netflix, or where ever you purchase or rent films digitally.

Calvin Gibbs: Sentenced to Life; Granted new hearing in 2016
Andrew Holmes: Sentenced to 7 years in prison; Released from prison
Jeremy Morlock: Sentenced to 8 years in prison
Michael Wagnon: Murder charges dropped by Army
Adam Winfield: Sentenced to 3 years; Released from prison

Related Links:
Violent Crime at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington

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SSG Christopher Wilbur, US Army, Died of a Non Combat-Related Injury in Kandahar, Afghanistan (2016)

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SSG Christopher Wilbur, US Army

SSG Christopher Wilbur, US Army, died of a non combat related injury in Kandahar, Afghanistan on August 12, 2016. SSG Wilbur was supporting Operation Freedom’s Sentinel on behalf of the 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, in Fort Carson, Colorado. According to the Department of Defense, the incident is under investigation.

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Army Casualty
Fort Carson Army Sergeant killed
Fort Carson army sergeant killed in Afghanistan incident
Army sergeant from Illinois killed in Afghanistan incident
4th ID soldier dies of noncombat injury in Kandahar
Fort Carson Army sergeant Christopher Wilbur of Illinois killed in Afghanistan incident

Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)

Map of Afghanistan

2014
3 May 14: Pfc Daniela Rojas, Army (non-combat related illness, required treatment beyond military’s capability)

2013
2 Jul 13: Spc Hilda Clayton, Army (non-combat related incident, training exercise)
3 May 13: Capt Victoria Pinckney, USAF (KC-135 airplane crash, malfunction, pilot error)
11 Mar 13: Capt Sara Cullen, Army (helicopter crash during training mission, under investigation)

2012
3 Oct 12: SGT Camella Steedley, USMC (cause of death is under investigation)
5 Sep 12: CWO2 Thalia S Ramirez, Army (helicopter crash, under investigation)
24 Aug 12: Pfc Patricia L Horne, Army (unspecified causes)

2011
21 Dec 11: Spc Mikayla Bragg, Army (found shot & killed in a guard tower, military ruled suicide)
27 Apr 11: MSgt Tara Brown, USAF (gunfire wounds sustained from Afghan military trainee)
16 Apr 11: SSG Cynthia Taylor, Army (Afghan National Army soldier grenade attack)
16 Apr 11: SGT Linda Pierre, Army (Afghan National Army soldier grenade attack)

2010
16 Nov 10: LTC Gwendolyn Locht, USAF (non-combat related illness, Leukemia)
22 Oct 10: SSG Aracely Gonzalez O’Malley, Army (non-combat incident, brain aneurysm)

2009
8 Aug 09: SSG Tara Smith, Army (non-combat related medical condition)
27 Mar 09: LT Florence Choe, Navy (Afghan National Army soldier opened fire on military personnel)

2008
25 Jul 08: Spc Seteria Brown, Army (injuries sustained in a non-combat related incident, under investigation)

2007
28 Sep 07: Cpl Ciara Durkin, Army (single gunshot wound to the head, military ruled suicide, family suspects murder after Ciara shared concerns of safety)

2006
17 Feb 06: SrA Alecia Good, USAF (two helicopters crashed into the Gulf of Aden during a training mission)

2005
6 Apr 05: SGM Barbaralien Banks, Army (helicopter in which she was riding crashed)
6 Apr 05: Spc Chrystal Stout, SCARNG (helicopter in which she was riding crashed)

2004
4 Jul 04: Spc Julie Hickey, Army (complications from a non-combat-related illness)

2003
23 Mar 03: 1LT Tamara Archuleta, USAF (killed in a HH-60G Pave Hawk crash)

2002
12 Jun 02: SSgt Anissa Shero, USAF (killed in an MC-130H Combat Talon crash)
9 Jan 02: SGT Jeannette Winters, USMC (killed in a refueling tanker crash)

Civilians
6 Apr 13: Anne Smedinghoff, US State Dept (convoy vehicle struck by vehicle that exploded)
30 Dec 09: Jennifer Matthews, CIA (killed by an informant who had set a trap)
30 Dec 09: Elizabeth Hanson, CIA (killed by an informant who had set a trap)
7 Jan 09: Paula Loyd, Human Terrain System, US Army (doused with fuel & set afire by irate Afghan civilian)
3 Feb 05: Carmen Urdaneta, Management Sciences for Health (aircraft crash near Kabul)
3 Feb 05: Cristin Gadue, Management Sciences for Health (aircraft crash near Kabul)
3 Feb 05: Amy Meeks, Management Sciences for Health (aircraft crash near Kabul)

Related Links:
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)
Noonie Fortin: Killed in Afghanistan or in support of Operation Enduring Freedom

Charles Martland, US Army, Losing his Career for Roughing up Corrupt Afghan Official Accused of Rape

Charles Martland

Justice for Army 1st SGT. Class Charles Martland

“We’ve got to let people know what the military’s doing, how the lawyers are running the show.” ~Rep Duncan Hunter

GOP Representatives protested Charles Martland’s separation from the Army for roughing up a corrupt Afghan Official accused of rape. The Army agreed to postpone Sgt. Martland’s discharge and gave him 60 days to allow time to file an appeal. Since this case has emerged, more US soldiers have come forward and admitted that they were asked to overlook the rape of children perpetrated by officials in Afghanistan. The Pentagon denied the allegations and stated that they had no such policy in place but felt it important to respect cultural differences. “Postponing Sgt. Martland’s separation from the military for 60 days to allow him time to file an appeal is a good first step, but the Army must act to reverse his forced discharge,” Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Fla.) wrote in a letter to Army Secretary John McHugh.

Green Beret: Striking corrupt Afghan got me kicked out
Green Beret Who Beat Afghan Man Over Child’s Rape Faces Army Discharge
JBLM soldier who assaulted Afghan police commander over child’s rape faces Army discharge
JBLM soldier who beat Afghan man over child’s rape faces Army discharge
Army Kicking Out Decorated Green Beret Who Stood Up for Afghan Rape Victim
Green Beret compares U.S. military inaction in Afghan rapes to Penn State scandal
Colonel: U.S. Soldier Should Not ‘Impose’ on All Afghan Customs, Including Child Rape
US Army rejects appeal by Green Beret who was kicked out after confronting an alleged Afghan rapist
U.S. Soldiers Told to Ignore Sexual Abuse of Boys by Afghan Allies
U.S. military accused of telling soldiers to overlook Afghan abuse of boys
Report: U.S. Military Ignored Afghan Allies’ Pedophilia, Punished Those Who Spoke Up
‘One of the best’: Defenders show support for ousted Green Beret
Green Beret discharged for beating alleged child rapist speaks out
Pentagon: Afghan Child Abuse Should Not Be Interfered With Because It’s ‘Cultural’
U.S. military accused of telling soldiers to overlook Afghan abuse of boys
Pentagon: No policy to overlook Afghan abuse of children
Secretary Carter, show the world we won’t tolerate Afghan child rape
Congressman protests punishment of soldiers who confronted alleged child rapist
GOP Reps. try to prevent discharge of Green Beret who beat up alleged rapist
Congressmen Vern Buchanan, Duncan Hunter Introduce Resolution Calling for Reinstatement of Soldier Who Blew Whistle on Afghan Child Rape
Yes, our troops were ordered to ignore Afghan pedophiles
Army delays discharge of Green Beret who beat Afghan
Army secretary delays separation of Green Beret who beat up Afghan commander
GOP rep: Delaying discharge of Green Beret ‘good first step’
Vern Buchanan Goes to Bat for Green Beret, Asking Army for Full Reinstatement
Rep: Delaying Discharge Not Enough, Green Beret Should Be Exonerated For Standing Up To Afghan Boy Rapist
AFA gets behind ‘Save Sgt. Martland’ push
U.S. military indifference to Afghan sex abuse led boy to kill three Marines
American marines told to turn a blind eye to child sex abuse and now my son is dead, says father of New York marine gunned down by Afghan teen ‘who was kept as a sex slave by local police chief’

Noonie Fortin: Honoring our Female Soldiers

Women WarriorsIN MEMORY — is dedicated to some of the women  and men I have known who have died.

IRAQ — is dedicated to the American women who died while  serving our country in Iraq or near-by countries during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

AFGHANISTAN — is dedicated to the American women who died while  serving our country in Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom.

OTHER AREAS — is dedicated to the American women who died while serving our country in  other areas of the world since Desert Storm and 11 September 2001.

THE PENTAGON — is dedicated to all the American women (and one man who I personally knew) who died when a plane hit The Pentagon on 11 September 2001.

OKC — is dedicated to the American women who died when a bomb blew up the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City on 19 April 1995.

DESERT STORM — is dedicated to the American women who died during the Gulf War of 1990-1991.

VIETNAM — is dedicated to the American women who died while  serving our country in Vietnam.

EARLIER WARS —  is dedicated to the American women who died during the Korean War, World War II, World War I, Spanish-American War and Civil War.

Learn more here.