‘The Kill Team’ Movie Released: Based on the True Story of Army Whistleblower Adam Winfield (October 25, 2019)

When a young US soldier in Afghanistan witnesses other recruits killing civilians under the direction of a sadistic sergeant, he begins to fear that the men he’s serving with might be the ones to kill him. -The Kill Team (October 25, 2019)

“When Andrew Briggman (Nat Wolff), a young soldier in the US invasion of Afghanistan, witnesses other recruits killing innocent civilians under the direction of a sadistic leader, Sergeant Deeks (Alexander Skarsgård), he considers reporting them to higher-ups — but the heavily-armed, increasingly violent platoon becomes suspicious that someone in their ranks has turned on them, and Andrew begins to fear that he’ll be the next target.” –The Kill Team, A24 Films

Editor’s Note: If you would like to see ‘The Kill Team’ documentary released in 2014, please click here to watch the trailer and here to watch it on Prime Video (included with Prime). If you would like to see ‘The Kill Team’ movie released in 2019, please click here to rent or purchase it on Prime Video.

Related Links:
The Kill Team | A24
The Kill Team | Facebook
The Kill Team Movie (2019) | Prime Video
The Kill Team Documentary (2014) | Prime Video
Afghanistan War Movie The Kill Team Is an Absolutely Essential Documentary
Tribeca Film Review: ‘The Kill Team’
‘The Kill Team’: Tribeca Review | Reviews | Screen
Trailer for ‘The Kill Team’ spotlights Afghanistan war murders of 2010
‘The Kill Team’ and the Moral Injury of War: A Talk With the Film Director
‘The Kill Team,’ now a feature, revisits one of the most disturbing tales of the Afghanistan war
‘The Kill Team’ Star Nat Wolff and Director Dan Krauss on the Need to Protect Whistleblowers
‘The Kill Team’ Review: Bullying on the Battlefield
‘Kill Team’: The Documentary the Army Doesn’t Want You to See
‘Kill Team’ tells tough war story about a hard choice
The American Military Is Put Under a Microscope in ‘The Kill Team’ Trailer
‘The Kill Team’ Review | Hollywood Reporter
Inner Life, During Wartime: ‘The Kill Team’
‘The Kill Team’ Film Review: Nat Wolff’s Soldier Has a Crisis of Conscience in Afghanistan
Why Dan Krauss Turned His Documentary, ‘The Kill Team,’ Into A Feature Film
‘The Kill Team’ Review: Nat Wolff Leads a Harrowing Look at What it Means to Be ‘Army Strong’
The Kill Team Follows American Troops Intentionally Murdering Innocent Afghans. It’s Based On a True Story.
‘The Kill Team’: Dan Krauss’ War Film Spotlights Moral Questions Instead Of Non-Stop Action [Review]
‘The Kill Team:’ Skarsgard excels in the film based on a true story and the 2014 Krauss documentary
Review: The Kill Team Seeks to Dispel the Illusion of a Clean War
‘The Kill Team’ review: Afghanistan war film is punishing to watch
“The Kill Team” offers atrocities, but little insight into wartime murders of civilians
Review: ‘The Kill Team’ fails to match intensity of documentary account of war crimes
The Kill Team is a bleak but unspecific war drama
U.S. Soldiers’ War Crime Gets Hollywood Treatment
The Kill Team Tells a Familiar Story from a Different Angle
Interview: Dan Krauss on Going Deeper Inside “The Kill Team”
Alexander Skarsgard talks ‘The Kill Team,’ Meryl Streep and his famous father
The Kill Team Movie Review – Common Sense Media

Navy Sailor Brandon Caserta Died by Suicide at Naval Station Norfolk; Family Pushing for Suicide Prevention Legislation ‘The Brandon Act’ Focusing on Hazing & Bullying (June 25, 2018)

Brandon Caserta

AEAN Brandon Caserta, U.S. Navy (photo courtesy of the Caserta family)

The Brandon Act:

I can honestly say no one is looking in this because at this point, no one cares. I just looked at the suicide rate right now in the Navy and it is now reported 43 for the year so far. I looked at it on Wednesday of last week and it was at 37. What the heck is going on and when will someone anyone going to start caring about the men and women in our Armed Forces? We need to respect the flag AND the men and women who defend it and save their lives like they do us. We all need to write to our senators and congressional staff. We need The Brandon Act passed and quickly.

I’m going to explain what “The Brandon Act” is. It is designed to be a safe word that men and women in our Armed Forces can use if they are subjects of any kind of abuse whether it’s physical, emotional or mentally. Abuse comes in many, many forms to include bullying, hazing, threats, sexual, abusive leadership, and any kind of mental and emotional abuse. These are just a few abusive tactics that can be done to someone. “The Brandon Act” protects those who come forward asking for help. It is designed for these men and women to come forward and get the help they need and if the abuse merits it, the sailor or troop will have a right to ask to be reassigned to another command or unit without any retaliation whatsoever from anyone in their current command or their next assignment. Our hope is to bring suicides to an end and by using this “Act” will hopefully allow them the courage to get help when they need it and get them healed and back on the right path. This “Act” is in front of Congress right now and hopefully very soon, they will approve and pass it once it’s completely written. Thank you for reading. #thebrandonact

-Patrick and Teri Caserta (Brandon Caserta’s parents)

Sailor’s Death at Naval Station Norfolk Ruled Suicide:

Sailor’s death at Naval Station Norfolk ruled suicide. -WAVY TV 10 (June 26, 2018)

Peoria Family Hopes for Change in Military Culture After Son Takes His Own Life:

As Teri Caserta entered her son’s bedroom in their Peoria home, she broke down. It’s an emotion that Teri and her husband Patrick Caserta will always carry with them. Their son Brandon was in the United States Navy from 2015 to 2018. However, at just 21, Brandon would take his own life. -ABC 15 Arizona (June 14, 2019)

Parents of Norfolk-Based Sailor Who Committed Suicide Want Changes:

Brandon Caserta, 21, was a sailor. He died by suicide while stationed in Norfolk. His parents hope new legislation will protect future military men and women. -13 News Now (October 4, 2019)

Updates on The Brandon Act:
The Brandon Act | Facebook Public Page
‘Everybody’s overworked’ — string of Navy suicides raises concerns over sailor stress and toxic leadership
Following son’s death, Capital Region family raises flag on suicides in Navy
Family of Sailor who committed suicide at Naval Station Norfolk pushes for change
Parents hopeful sailor son’s suicide leads to legislation

Navy AEAN Brandon Caserta was stationed with the Helicopter Combat Sea Squadron 28 (HSC-28) at Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia when he died by suicide on June 25, 2018. While Brandon’s parents were on the phone with Navy leadership at the Squadron, Brandon walked out on the flight line, apologized to the plane captain (who is in-charge of the flight line), and hurled himself into a helicopter rotor, dying instantly. AEAN Caserta had a brief career with the Navy and it didn’t turn out the way he had hoped. He had failed Special Warfare Training and was transferred into a new career field as a result. And then unexpectedly Brandon broke his collar-bone in a bicycle accident, which also negatively impacted his Navy career. At the moment Brandon Caserta made his final walk out to the flight line, his father Patrick Caserta was on the phone with the command expressing concern for his son’s welfare. Patrick was making plans to fly out to Naval Station Norfolk to explore his son’s legal options.

Desperate for answers, the Casertas reached out to Brandon’s chain of command and friends but eventually everyone stopped responding. The Casertas were told by many friends in Brandon’s command that leadership ordered a cessation of communications. Before the silence, Brandon’s friends shared that they thought he appeared to be suffering from depression, feelings of worthlessness, and anger, hence the reason he left a note asking the Navy be held accountable. As a result of the information gleaned from the note and those who knew Brandon, the HSC-28 conducted an investigation of itself; basically the fox guarding the henhouse. Although they knew months in advance of the problems, the report did note that Brandon’s supervisor had a history of berating and belittling those who worked for him. As a matter of fact, this supervisor could have been court-martialed under UCMJ Article 93, Cruelty and Maltreatment, but he wasn’t. Instead, Military.com reports he received no punishment and was transferred with a “declining evaluation” (and this was only after it was heard and reported that he made “derogatory and inflammatory comments concerning the deceased”).

“I want to see as many people fired, kicked out or, at the very least, lose rank.” -Brandon Caserta, U.S. Navy

According to Military.com, the Navy’s suicide rate in 2018 was the highest it’s ever been. And it was reported that a post-mortem analyses of suicides in the military usually showed the victim “faced major issues like financial problems, relationship problems, medical issues, and mental health conditions.” The military reporter reached out to Dave Matsuda, an anthropologist at California State University-East Bay, who researched and studied a suicide cluster among soldiers in Iraq in 2010. Matsuda’s research found some non-commissioned officers (NCOs) and officers in the chain of command made their subordinates’ lives a “living hell.” Matsuda also added that although the “bad leaders weren’t fully responsible for the suicides, they helped push the soldiers over the edge.” But in a system where the Navy is investigating the Navy, we have learned that the Chain of Command isn’t going to admit there is a problem. They have a history of blaming the victim and/or scapegoating an enlisted NCO or lower ranking military officer.

Brandon’s father, Patrick Caserta, a retired U.S. Navy sailor himself, asserts the Command was “so hostile, corruptive and unethical,” that they tormented Brandon and drove him past the brink of despair. Patrick and Teri Caserta wholeheartedly believe the command murdered their son. Patrick reminded us that the military talks about trauma, exposure to war, and mental health, but they don’t talk about harassment and bullying. He believes military leadership do not want to admit harassment, bullying, and retaliation happen or admit they are at fault. In the days and weeks that followed their son’s death, Patrick and Teri also learned from those who worked with Brandon that they were all dealing with a high operational tempo and manpower shortfalls. Brandon’s co-workers believed “personal issues were not a high priority and Brandon’s death could have been prevented.” And an anonymous message sent to the squadron commander on June 18, 2018 revealed the abuse was ongoing before Brandon died.

According to the message, Brandon’s supervisor called subordinates his “bitches,” referred to the chiefs as “douchebags” and “dumbasses” behind their backs, and “treated workers worse than garbage” and “like dogs.” –Military.com (June 8, 2019)

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Military.com reported that Brandon Caserta’s death was one of 68 Navy suicides in 2018. They also reported the rise in military suicides appears to mirror an increase in suicides among the general U.S. population. Suicide experts are struggling to understand why so many are dying by suicide. Some factors for suicide risk, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), include “spending time in prison or jail, having a mental health disorder or a substance abuse problem, experiencing family violence, a history of suicide, and having guns in the home.” Brandon’s family believes their son’s suicide was a direct result of toxic leadership, one superior who harassed and bullied Brandon, pushing him over the edge. According to Army Doctrine Publication 6-22, a toxic leader “operates with an inflated sense of self-worth and from acute self-interest,” consistently using “dysfunctional behaviors to deceive, intimidate, coerce, or unfairly punish others to get what they want for themselves.” Although it appears there are multiple variables that impact when a service member chooses to die by suicide, the experts need to find out the why so we can save our service member’s lives. What is happening in their environment that makes them feel like suicide is the only way out?

The directive states, toxic leaders exhibit a combination of “self centered attitudes, motivations, and behaviors that have adverse effects on subordinates, the organization, and mission performance.” –Military.com (June 8, 2019)

Military.com reported that one of Brandon’s co-workers helped shed some insight into the toxic climate at the Navy’s HSC-28 squadron. He accused leadership of deploying personnel in retaliation for speaking up and not doing as they are told. This particular individual requested that he remain at the squadron when his wife got sick because he needed to support her and their two girls. But his leadership was going to deploy him with a detachment anyways. So he filed an Inspector General complaint and thankfully was transferred out of the squadron in a couple weeks. He believes Navy personnel have a “fear of retribution” because the command is resentful of the service members who can’t deploy. Brandon’s family experienced a form of retaliation as well. The unit held a memorial service for Brandon four days after he died but Patrick and Teri said they were not invited by anyone in the HSC-28 command. Patrick Caserta believes the family was excluded out of sheer pettiness; leadership wanted to continue to conceal and coverup what truly happened. Regardless of the reason, it was a violation of Navy policy.

“Navy policy states that the command should provide round-trip travel and allowances to family members to attend a command memorial service.” –Military.com (June 8, 2019)

On May 31, 2019, after the command learned that Military.com had made phone calls regarding the Casertas’ allegations, Navy personnel indicated there was a “culture of fear” at the squadron. The Casertas are so angry and distraught that communications have stopped that they offered a $25,000 reward to anyone who came forward with information that “lead to successful prosecution of individuals in their son’s chain of command.” They have also met with the congressional staff of at least a dozen senators and representatives, including Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA) and Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) to discuss “the treatment they and Brandon received, request an independent investigation, and promote efforts to prevent suicide linked to toxic leadership.” They also would like to see the Navy implement Brandon Caserta’s request in his suicide note regarding the re-rate process: “sailors who don’t complete the training for the rate they initially sought should be able to select any other training they qualify for with their Armed Services Vocational Battery (ASVAB) test results.”

Anthropologist Dave Matsuda told Military.com that to truly address the problem of suicide in the armed forces, “all the services need to consider ‘toxic leadership’ when analyzing the deaths of each individual.” If we understand the why, we can prevent suicide. Matsuda also believes operational leaders should not rely on “the boot camp strategy of breaking people down to build them back up.” Matsuda concluded with the assertion that indeed a toxic command climate can trigger suicidal behavior. One year later, Patrick and Teri Caserta are determined to get justice for their only son, because they believe this tragedy could’ve been prevented. The pair also report that Congress is drafting “The Brandon Act,” which is “federal legislation aimed at ending military suicides, holding commanders accountable, and halting the bullying and hazing that occurs within military ranks.” Please contact both the Senate Armed Services Committee (SASC) members and the House Armed Services Committee (HASC) members and your Senators and Representative to ask that they too support our troops by supporting The Brandon Act. Our service members deserve a chance at a beautiful life post military.

“The Brandon Act” is designed to be a safe word that men and women in our Armed Forces can use if they are subjects of any kind of abuse whether it’s physical, emotional or mentally. Abuse comes in many, many forms to include bullying, hazing, threats, sexual, abusive leadership, and any kind of mental and emotional abuse. These are just a few abusive tactics that can be done to someone. “The Brandon Act” protects those who come forward asking for help. It is designed for these men and women to come forward and get the help they need and if the abuse merits it, the sailor or troop will have a right to ask to be reassigned to another command or unit without any retaliation whatsoever from anyone in their current command or their next assignment. Our hope is to bring suicides to an end and by using this “Act” will hopefully allow them the courage to get help when they need it and get them healed and back on the right path. This “Act” is in front of Congress right now and hopefully very soon, they will approve and pass it once it’s completely written. Thank you for reading. –Justice for Brandon Caserta on Facebook (June 20, 2019) #TheBrandonAct

Sources: Patrick Caserta (Brandon’s father), Patricia Kime, Military.com, and related links

Related Links:
The Brandon Act | Facebook Public Page
Obituary: Brandon Patrick Caserta (June 25, 2018)
3rd Cowpens CO Fired Since 2010; CMC Relieved (2014)
Army Takes On Its Own Toxic Leaders (2014)
‘I now hate my ship’: Surveys reveal disastrous morale on cruiser Shiloh (2017)
Navy: Failures of Leaders, Watchstanders Led to Deadly Ship Collisions (2017)
Former MCPON Bawled Out Staff, Made Sailors Fetch Coffee: Investigation
His Suicide Note Was a Message to the Navy. The Way He Died Was the Exclamation Point
When Driven to Suicide, at a Minimum it is Manslaughter! – The Navy’s Incessant Harassment of Brandon Caserta Ultimately Drove Him to Suicide – People Were Promoted, Instead of Held Accountable
Suicides Are Still On The Rise In The Military — Is That Really a Surprise? Spoiler: The Answer Is ‘No.’
Peoria family hopes for change in military culture after son takes his own life
Family hopes for change in military culture after son takes his own life
Family hopes for change in military culture after son takes his own life
Peoria family hopes for change in military culture after son takes his own life (YouTube)
An Open Letter to Air Force Commanders about Suicide
‘Everybody’s overworked’ — string of Navy suicides raises concerns over sailor stress and toxic leadership
Following son’s death, Capital Region family raises flag on suicides in Navy
Family of Sailor who committed suicide at Naval Station Norfolk pushes for change
Parents hopeful sailor son’s suicide leads to legislation
Parents of Norfolk-based sailor who committed suicide want changes
Sailor’s death at Naval Station Norfolk ruled suicide
Peoria family hopes for change in military culture after son takes his own life
Parents of Norfolk-based sailor who committed suicide want changes
Army Staff Sgt. Paul Norris Fatally Shot Army Spc. Kamisha Block in Iraq After She Ended a Forbidden Relationship, Then Ended His Own Life (August 16, 2007)
Camp Lejeune Marine Maria Lauterbach & Unborn Child Murdered, Remains Discovered in Fellow Marine’s Backyard; Cesar Laurean Sentenced to Life in Prison, No Parole (December 15, 2007)
Military Rape Survivor Army Sgt. Amanda Sheldon Died by Suicide After Suffering With Depression; Family Hopes Her Death May Spark Change (October 7, 2010)
Lauterbach Case Prompts Policy Reforms for Victims of Crime in the Military (December 25, 2011)
Army Directive 2011-19: Expedited Transfer or Reassignment Procedures for Victims of Sexual Assault (3 Oct 11)
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members (2016)
Army Soldiers at Fort Hood in Texas Are Dying at Alarming Rates Stateside (2017)
Are More Male’s Victims of Violent Crime in the United States Than Females? (2017)
September: U.S. Department of Defense Casualties Report from September 11, 2001 to Present (2017)
Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces, Transfer Policies Panel (2017)
48 Hours NCIS Premiered ‘Trail of Fire’ on CBS: Holley Wimunc, Domestic Violence, and the Holley Lynn James Act (June 26, 2018)
ProPublica: ‘Death and Valor on an American Warship Doomed by Its Own Navy’ (February 6, 2019)
Senate Armed Services Committee Members & House Armed Services Committee Members (June 21, 2019)
The Brandon Act | Justice for Brandon Caserta
Justice for Brandon Caserta | Facebook
Navy Failed Their Son | ABC 15 Arizona

Raheel Siddiqui, US Marine Corps (2016)

160630-raheel-siddiqui-mdl_6962d17e365422e62dff62ac50078385.nbcnews-fp-360-360

Raheel Siddiqui, US Marine Corps

Marine Corps recruit Raheel Siddiqui died while attending boot camp at Parris Island in South Carolina on March 18, 2016.

Related Links:
Parris Island recruit jumped to death while in boot camp training
U.S. Marine from Taylor dies at Parris Island recruit training facility
Death of Marine recruit at Parris Island under investigation
Death of Marine at South Carolina boot camp under investigation
Marines instructors under investigation after death of Muslim recruit
Marines Expand Hazing Probe Following Recruit Raheel Siddiqui’s Death
A Marine Recruit’s Death Spurred An Important Investigation
Marine Corps Officials Recommend Charges in Death of Muslim Recruit
Marine Corps Completed Three Command-Level Investigations at Parris Island
Marines: Recruit committed suicide amid culture of hazing, abuse
Following a Marine recruit’s death, a culture of hazing is exposed on a storied base
Siddiqui family: USMC investigation leaves ‘unanswered’ questions
Documents disclose alleged Marine hazing at Parris Island
Marine recruit’s death didn’t stop hazing, abuse in his platoon, USMC finds
20 Marines Face Discipline After Muslim Recruit’s Death Is Ruled a Suicide
Up to 20 marines could face disciplinary action over Muslim recruit’s death
Timeline of recruit Raheel Siddiqui at Parris Island Marine base before suicide
Marine recruit’s death uncovers pattern of abuse by some drill instructors
USMC: Before Recruit Died, Platoon Mates Ordered to Beat One Another
Day before Parris Island recruit died, platoon mates ordered to beat one another, USMC found
Muslim marine says he was called a ‘terrorist’ and thrown in an industrial dryer at scandal-plagued South Carolina boot camp
Muslim Marine Placed in Clothes Dryer by Instructor, Asked if He Was ‘Terrorist’
“They put us through hell”: A Marine abused at boot camp explains why he spoke out
911 audio reveals new details about morning of USMC recruit’s death
Marine Corps drill instructors will be watched more closely after Parris Island scandal
The Mysterious Death of a Muslim Marine Recruit
Muslim Marine Trainee Killed Himself … or Did He?
Marine recruits testify about drill instructor at hearing
Marine Corps Holding Hearing To Determine If Charges Will Move Forward In Recruit’s Death
Corps names 2 Parris Island DIs for courts-martial; one linked to Muslim recruit’s death
Marines to court-martial drill instructor after Muslim recruit’s death
Marine drill instuctor to face court martial after Michigan recruit’s death
Marine drill instructor faces court martial in connection with death of Muslim recruit ‘who killed himself after he was called a terrorist and was physically abused at boot camp’
Dingell Statement on Referral of Charges Related to Raheel Siddiqui Case
One NCIS investigation at Parris Island is over, but another continues
Hearing set for USMC drill instructor linked to Siddiqui’s death
USMC Recruit Had To Get Skin Grafts After Hazing Incident
Official fired after Taylor Marine Raheel Siddiqui’s death faces hearing
Official fired after Marine recruit’s death at Parris Island faces hearing
How the Death of a Muslim Recruit Revealed a Culture of Brutality in the Marines
Lt. Col. Joshua Kissoon, US Marine Corps (Military Corruption)


Why did a 20-year-old recruit jump to his death at the Marine Corps training facility at Parris Island? That question spurred an internal investigation, which uncovered a larger pattern of hazing and abuse. William Brangham joins Judy Woodruff to offer a closer look at the investigation. -PBS NewsHour

Non Combat Deaths of Female Service Members in the U.S. Military (Iraq)

Map of Iraq

    • 111 US women died in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)
    • 69 female soldiers considered Combat Death (63%)
    • 41 female soldiers considered Non-Combat Death (37%)
    • 1 civilian journalist from the Boston Globe died in a vehicle accident
    • Non-Combat Death: Homicide, Suicide, Unknown, Accidents, Medical
      • Combat: 69 (63%)
      • Homicide/Suicide/Unknown: 23 (21%)
      • Accidents: 12 (11%)
      • Medical: 6 (5%)
    • 36 of 41 Non-Combat Deaths are in Army (88%) 

Screen Shot 2016-08-11 at 7.42.00 PM

2018
19 Feb 18: Sgt. Christina Schoenecker, U.S. Army (non-combat related incident)

(Editor’s Note: 2018 not included in stats)

2010
2 Jul 10: Spc Morganne McBeth, U.S. Army (ruled negligent homicide, stabbed by a knife wielding soldier)
8 Mar 10: SSG Lakeshia Bailey, U.S. Army (vehicle rollover, accident)
21 Feb 10: CWO2 Billie Grinder, Tennessee Army National Guard (hard landing, family sued helicopter maker for faulty system that caused crash and settled)
10 Feb 10: Pfc Adriana Alvarez, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, outcome of investigation unknown)

2009
4 Nov 09: SSG Amy (Seyboth) Tirador, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, Army ruled suicide, family believes execution style murder, cold case)

2008
19 Oct 08: LCpl Stacy Dryden, U.S. Marine Corps (fight with fellow soldier, ruled homicide, cold case)
1 Sep 08: SSG Renee Deville, U.S. Army (injured in Iraq, died unexpectedly at Walter Reed Army Medical Center after graduating from NCO course)
14 Aug 08: Pvt Janelle King, U.S. Army (non combat related incident, outcome of investigation unknown)
2 Aug 08: Pfc Jennifer Cole, U.S. Army (gunshot wound to abdomen, ruled negligent homicide)
17 Jul 08: TSgt Jackie Larsen, U.S. Air Force (medical, natural causes)
9 May 08: Spc Mary Jaenichen, U.S. Army (non-combat related injury, outcome of investigation unknown)
22 Feb 08: Spc Keisha Morgan, U.S. Army (death ruled accidental overdose, family suspects rape and murder, cold case)
25 Jan 08: Sgt Tracy Birkman, U.S. Army (non-combat related injury, outcome of investigation unknown)

2007
20 Sep 07: Capt (Dr) Roselle Hoffmaster, U.S. Army (death ruled suicide)
7 Sep 07: Spc Marisol Heredia, U.S. Army (non-combat injuries, medical, severely burned, died in Texas from infection, outcome of investigation unknown)
16 Aug 07: Spc Kamisha J Block, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, ruled homicide, domestic violence and workplace violence)
9 Aug 07: SSG Alicia Birchett, U.S. Army (vehicle ran over her while she was changing tire, outcome of investigation unknown)
7 Feb 07: Capt Jennifer Harris, U.S. Marine Corps (helicopter crash, no sign that it involved hostile fire, outcome of investigation unknown)
28 Jan 07: Spc Carla Stewart, U.S. Army (wounds sustained when convoy vehicle rolled over)
20 Jan 07: CSM Marilyn Gabbard, Iowa Army National Guard (helicopter crash, might have been shot down, outcome of investigation unknown)

2006
12 Dec 06: Major Gloria Davis, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, death ruled suicide)
26 Nov 06: SSG Jeannette Dunn, U.S. Army (non-combat related injury, outcome of investigation unknown)
4 Sep 06: Pfc Hannah McKinney, U.S. Army (struck by vehicle, family believes rape & murder)
8 Apr 06: Lance Cpl. Juana Arellano, U.S. Marine Corps (wounds received supporting combat operations)
11 Mar 06: Pfc Amy Duerksen, U.S. Army (non-combat gunshot injury, parents share in media Amy was raped at Fort Hood prior to deployment)
1 Mar 06: Pfc Tina Priest, U.S. Army (reported rape, died of non-combat gunshot wound to the chest, cold case)
7 Jan 06: 1LT Jaime L. Campbell, Alaska Army National Guard (helicopter crash)

2005
19 Jul 05: Pfc LaVena Johnson, U.S. Army (non-combat gunshot injury, death ruled suicide, family claims rape and murder based on autopsy evidence)
4 Mar 05: Spc Adriana Salem, U.S. Army (accident, military vehicle roll over)
1 Mar 05: Spc Lizbeth Robles, U.S. Army (injuries sustained in a military vehicle accident)
16 Feb 05: Spc Katrina Bell-Johnson, U.S. Army (accident, vehicle rollover)

2004
13 Dec 04: SSG Tina Time, U.S. Army Reserve (supply truck she was driving during a dust storm collided with another military vehicle)
4 Oct 04: SSG Gina Sparks, U.S. Army (died at Fort Polk, Louisiana from injuries sustained from a non-combat gunshot wound in Iraq)
6 Jun 04: Pfc Melissa Hobart, U.S. Army (undetermined cause, died after collapsing while on guard duty)
7 Mar 04: Capt Gussie Jones, U.S. Army (non-combat related cause, outcome of investigation unknown)
14 Jan 04: SSG Keicia Hines, U.S. Army (Army reports accidentally struck by a vehicle)

2003
8 Nov 03: SSG Linda Jimenez, U.S. Army (medical, fell running to keep up with friends, died of complications at Walter Reed after a blood clot formed, caused stroke)
1 Oct 03: Spc Tamarra Ramos, U.S. Army (medical, non-combat related injuries, cancer)
15 Sep 03: Spc Alyssa Peterson, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, death ruled suicide)
9 Jul 03: SSG Melissa Valles, U.S. Army (noncombat gunshot wound to abdomen)
8 May 03: CIVILIAN Elizabeth Neuffer, Boston Globe Journalist (automobile accident)

Related Links:
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)
Noonie Fortin: Killed in Iraq or in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom
Is There an Army Cover-Up of Rape and Murder of Women Soldiers?
U.S. Military Keeping Secrets About Female Soldiers’ ‘Suicides’?
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members

Pvt Danny Chen, US Army, Died of a Non Combat-Related Incident in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan (2011)

danny-chen

Pvt Danny Chen, US Army

Pvt. Danny Chen, 19, US Army, died of a non combat-related incident in Kandahar province, Afghanistan on October 3, 2011. Pvt Chen was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom on behalf of the 3rd Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division in Fort Wainwright, Alaska.

Related Links:
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
Army Pvt. Danny Chen
Hazing and Harassment in the Military
Army charges 8 in Afghanistan in death of fellow U.S. soldier
8 soldiers charged in death of fellow serviceman
8 U.S. Army Soldiers Charged in Death of Fellow Serviceman in Afghanistan
Danny Chen’s family seeks justice in Army hazing death
Pvt. Danny Chen’s Family Speaks Out Against Military Hazing As Final Soldier Faces Punishment
Pvt. Danny Chen, 1992–2011
Why Black America Should Care About Private Danny Chen’s Suicide
Death of Private Danny Chen: Military Admits Chen was Target of Race-Based Hazing on Daily Basis
Charges referred in Pvt. Danny Chen case
Pvt. Danny Chen committed suicide a day before he was to be transferred, witness says
Army suicide testimony: Sergeant taunted Danny Chen with slurs
As Danny Chen Case Continues, Questions About Soldiers’ Punishments
A Young Private’s Suicide Reflects a Massive Failure of Leadership
Platoon Leader Dismissed from Army for Hazing Death of Pvt. Danny Chen
Military Court Convicts US Soldier in Hazing Trial
Soldier Convicted in Pvt. Danny Chen Suicide Case
Three Years Later, A Moment of Silence for Private Danny Chen
OCA remembers Private Danny Chen
Who Killed Private Danny Chen?
Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, Pvt. Danny Chen, and our highly conditional love of American soldiers
An Opera Remembers The Tragedy Of An Asian-American Soldier
Manhattan Street Renamed for Danny Chen, Soldier Bullied into Suicide in Afghanistan
Outrage over Army platoon’s ‘Racial Thursdays’ where soldiers would hurl slurs at fellow troops and private who committed suicide once served

Spc Brushaun Anderson, US Army, Died of a Non Combat-Related Incident in Baghdad, Iraq (2010)

spc-brushaun-anderson

Spc Brushaun Anderson, US Army

Spc Brushaun X. Anderson, 20, US Army, died of a non combat related incident in Baghdad, Iraq on January 1, 2010. Spc Anderson was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom on behalf of the 2nd Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) in Fort Drum, N.Y. According to the Department of Defense, the circumstances surrounding the incident are under investigation.

Related Links:
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
Army Spc. Brushaun X. Anderson
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Army charges 8 in Afghanistan in death of fellow U.S. soldier

MA1 Jennifer Valdivia, US Navy, Died in a Non Combat Related Incident in Bahrain, NCIS Ruled Death Suicide by Carbon Monoxide Poisoning (2007)

Honoring Jennifer Valdivia @USNavy (2007)

Jennifer Valdivia, US Navy

MA1 Jennifer Valdivia, 27, US Navy, died in a non combat related incident in Bahrain on January 16, 2007. MA1 Valdivia was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom on behalf of the naval security force for Naval Support Activity in Bahrain. At the time of the press release the Department of Defense announced that her death was under investigation and Bahrain was located within the designated hostile fire zone. Naval Criminal Investigation Services (NCIS) eventually ruled her death suicide by carbon monoxide poisoning.

Toussaint, who led the Bahrain unit until March 2006, was at the center of a 2007 command investigation that documented more than 90 instances of abuse, including sailors being ordered to simulate homosexual sex in training videos, hogtied to chairs and force-fed dog treats. “If my daughter didn’t do what he told her to do, he would embarrass her in front of everybody in the kennel, belittle her,” Young said. “Everybody who was friends with Jennifer tells me the same story: She was the fall person. She was the scapegoat.” ~Pilot Online

Jennifer was at the center of command directed investigation of abuse of prisoners in Bahrain. It was reported that she did not want to participate in war crimes yet was belittled, harassed, and abused by a supervisor if she didn’t do what he told her to do. If she had a way out, could this suicide have been prevented? Was it a suicide? Was it ever investigated as a homicide? Who found her? Was it reported to the Commander first? Did the Commander do an initial investigation? Does the Navy have NCIS located in Bahrain? How quickly did NCIS respond to the scene located in what is described as a designated hostile fire zone?

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Navy Casualty
Navy Master-at-Arms 1st Class Jennifer A. Valdivia
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