Military Rape Documentary Funded and Distributed by Serial Predator and Hollywood Movie Executive Harvey Weinstein

Listen to a NYPD sting operation recording of Harvey Weinstein here.

Both “The Invisible War” and “The Hunting Ground” were documentaries produced and directed by Hollywood filmmakers Kirby Dick and Amy Ziering. The Invisible War was an unvetted documentary about sexual assault and rape in the U.S. military. It was lauded by the masses, showcased at the Pentagon, and apparently used to influence Senator Claire McCaskill’s military justice legislation. Before we could wrap our heads around how these filmmakers had silenced veteran’s voices (again), they released The Hunting Ground, another unvetted documentary about sexual assault and rape on our nation’s campuses. And now we are learning that these documentaries were both funded and distributed by serial predator and Hollywood movie executive Harvey Weinstein of the Weinstein Company. In the wake of this provable scandal, Amy Ziering came to the defense of the indefensible and admitted in an interview that The Invisible War resulted in thirty five pieces of legislation passed by Congress.

The problem is the only laws passed were Senator Claire McCaskill’s bills. By taking credit for Claire McCaskill’s legislation (that military and veterans did not want), Ziering is admitting to undermining veteran’s efforts to secure due process rights for service members. We wanted them to have due process rights in the military justice system AND with non judicial punishment, retaliation, mental health, security clearance, and discharge. There’s nothing to take credit for unless you back Senator Claire McCaskill’s flawed military sexual assault legislation. Veterans resoundingly wanted the Military Justice Improvement Act sponsored by Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and supported by multiple bi-partisan Senators including conservatives who saw the constitutional issues with the command directed approach. BUT it was railroaded by Senator Claire McCaskill, Senator Carl Levin (now retired), and Senator Kelly Ayotte (now fired). And obviously backed by the filmmakers of a documentary about sexual assault funded and distributed by the very serial predator veterans were trying to hold accountable, especially the leadership tasked with implementing Senator McCaskill’s bills.

The connection has been made. In the wake of the flawed and failed policy in both the military and on college campuses, what these folks felt they knew was best actually created new victims. And it isn’t coincidental that the legislation passed in the military mirrors the unconstitutional use of preponderance of the evidence (50%+) on college campuses. This 2011 guidance came from Obama’s Department of Education Office of Civil Rights and Senator Claire McCaskill and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand are trying to get the policy codified as law with the CASA Act. In a stunning twist, newly appointed Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos reversed the harmful policy and reinstated due process protections for the accused on campus. The days of believe all women OR ELSE and holding institutions of authority hostage if you don’t believe the alleged victim are over on our college campuses. Campuses are able to reverse the harmful policy guidance but veterans have to reverse 35 pieces of sexual assault specific legislation that have had devastating consequences on military members and their families.

For all of its flaws and fabrications, “The Hunting Ground,” Harvey Weinstein’s activist documentary film about sexual assault on college campuses, finally succeeded in helping to actually identify a real predator — the filmmaker himself. And, although some of his apologists like filmmaker Rob Reiner tried to excuse Mr. Weinstein’s predatory behavior by saying that he should be lauded for having funded the film to expose the epidemic of rape on college campuses, “The Hunting Ground” helped to fuel a moral panic about sex abuse that directly led to Mr. Weinstein’s own professional demise…The good news is that as more and more powerful people become swept up in the hysteria surrounding sexual assault and people see themselves as vulnerable to such charges, the panic will end as spontaneously as it began. In some ways, a moral panic can be viewed as a “correction” — not unlike a market correction. We needed to bring attention to the Harvey Weinsteins lurking among us. Perhaps now we can now begin to look at sexual assault more rationally — identifying the “real” predators among us. Prof. Anne Hendershott, Washington Times

Related Links:
Claire McCaskill’s ‘lonely’ sex-assault stand
The war in Congress over rape in the military, explained
How The Hunting Ground Blurs the Truth
The big lie behind the campus-rape crusade
Major Study On Campus Sex Assault Debunked
19 Harvard Law Professors Defend Law Student Brandon Winston, Denouncing His Portrayal in “The Hunting Ground”
Professors Dispute Depiction of Harvard Case in Rape Documentary
How The Hunting Ground Spreads Myths About Campus Rape
The continuing collapse of ‘The Hunting Ground,’ a campus sexual assault propaganda film
Betsy DeVos’s full speech on Title IX and campus sex assault
Harvey Weinstein: Secret recording of undercover sting
Wendy Williams: Harvey Weinstein Speaks Out
Harvey Weinstein, Hollywood and hypocrisy
Actress Heather Graham Confirms EVERYONE Knew About Weinstein
Harvey Weinstein Proves Money Matter to Democrats, Not Women’s Lives
Hillary Clinton falsely claims Donald Trump is an ‘admitted sex assaulter’ as she compares him to Harvey Weinstein – but claims allegations against Bill are ‘clearly in the past’
Here’s A Live Look At The Women’s March Group Protesting Hollywood’s Rampant Sexual Abuse
Harvey Weinstein Paid Off Sexual Harassment Accusers for Decades
Jane Fonda Feels ‘Ashamed’ for Not Speaking Out About Harvey Weinstein Earlier
Hollywood’s dishonest campus rape panic
An Interview with the Producer of the Harvey Weinstein-Distributed Rape Documentary
Harvey Weinstein’s history begs for a documentary about Hollywood abuses. But can it be made?
California’s Attempt To Reject Betsy DeVos’s Campus Rape Policies Just Failed

Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Riley, Kansas (US Army)


Fort Riley provides a Modern State-of-the-Art full spectrum, maneuver-friendly training environment in the Midwest, supporting the “Total Army.” Check out this five minute video to learn why Fort Riley finds itself positioned perfectly to provide for the Army’s current and future training needs. -DVIDSHUB

*Research not complete, includes combat deaths

2017
Dameko Artis, Civilian: Fort Riley man victim of shooting at shopping center
Eugene Cleaver, US Army Veteran: Former soldier stationed at Fort Riley sentenced to 17 years for sexual abuse of child in Texas
Richard Cox, US Army: Died 4 days after suffering gunshot wound
Alejandro Franquiz, US Army: Self-inflicted gunshot wound off post
Xavier Harden, US Army: Entered the lake from a boat and didn’t resurface, body later recovered
Ikaika Kang, US Army: FBI arrested former Ft Riley soldier in HI on terror charges
John Martinez, US Army: Found unresponsive in his barracks room
Peter Robbins, US Army: Shot and killed by police in Junction City

2016
Antonio Bates, US Army: In 2016, veteran sentenced to 15 years in prison for sexual abuse of a minor in the 1990s while stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas
Phillip Cruz-Medellin, US Army: Found dead in nearby Manhattan
Oscar Delgado, US Army: Found dead on post after missing for a week
Wayne Grigsby, US Army: Relieved of command of the 1st Infantry Division due to loss of confidence in ability to lead, suspended and fired
Joseph Stifter, US Army: Died in fatal roll-over accident, Iraq

2015
Randy Billings, US Army: Killed in Black Hawk UH-60 helicopter crash, Afghanistan
Peter Bohler, US Army: Killed in Black Hawk UH-60 helicopter crash, Afghanistan
Christopher Boynton, US Army: Found dead with gunshot wound on post
James Duke, US Army: Sentenced to 10 years in federal prison after convicted of aggravated sexual abuse of a child, most assaults happened in military housing at Fort Riley from 1996 to 2001
Jessica Echevarria, US Army Spouse: Found dead on post, single vehicle accident
Cyjay Echon, US Army: Jailed after allegedly put infant child in hospital, in critical condition, held on $150,000 bond, waived preliminary hearing
Omar Forde, US Army: Killed in Black Hawk UH-60 helicopter crash, Afghanistan
Kenyon Givens, US Army Dependent: Died from gunshot wound on post
Terry Gordon, US Army: Killed in Black Hawk UH-60 helicopter crash, Afghanistan
Juwan Jackson, US Army Dependent: Charged with involuntary manslaughter by US Attorney’s office
Brian Mastin, US Army: Arrested on child abuse & criminal threatening charges after standoff, suicidal
Alexander McConnell, US Army: Sentenced to 15 years in prison for second degree murder and 2 charges of child abuse
Joshua Silverman, US Army: Killed in Black Hawk UH-60 helicopter crash, Afghanistan

2014
James Henning, US Army: arrested for sexual exploitation of a child, rape, and aggravated sodomy; bond set at $5,000,000, sentenced to life
Scott Wilhelm, US Army: Arrested for sexual exploitation of a child, sexting

2013
Daniel Parker, US Army: Convicted of first degree murder, appealing
Sean Vincent, US Army: Arrested on charges in alleged child pornography case
Kimberly Walker, US Army: Homicide victim of boyfriend, Army soldier

2012
Michael Braden, US Army: Found unresponsive in his living quarters, Afghanistan
John Hughes, US Army: Convicted in the stabbing death of another soldier, sentenced to life in prison without parole
Todd Lambka, US Army: Died from wounds suffered in IED explosion, Afghanistan
Thomas Lavrey, US Army: Found unresponsive in living quarters on post
Jesus Lopez, US Army: Died from wounds suffered in IED explosion, Afghanistan

2011
Nathan Conley, US Army: Found dead in barracks room at WTB, ruled suicide
Florinda Evans, US Army: Accused of homicide by husband’s father
LaShawn Evans, US Army Dependant: Found dead in wife’s barracks in Iraq with gunshot wound to head, Army ruled suicide at first but reclassified to homicide
Aaron Evilsizer, US Army: Found dead of self-inflicted gunshot wound off post
Brice Scott, US Army: Died when insurgents attacked unit, Afghanistan

2010
Eddie Lowery, US Army Veteran: Wrongfully convicted by civilians of a rape that occurred in 1981 while stationed at Fort Riley, cleared by DNA, awarded 7.5 million
Hugh Marquez Jr, US Army: Found dead at friend’s house in Manhatten
Benjamin Miller, US Army: Found unresponsive in vehicle on post

2009
John Digrazia, US Army: Found unresponsive in barracks on post

2007
Jason Butkus, US Army: Died when insurgents attacked unit, Iraq
Camy Florexil, US Army: Died when IED detonated near vehicle, Iraq
Braden Long, US Army: Died when vehicle came under grenade attack, Iraq
Daniel Miller, US Army: Non-combat related incident, Afghanistan
Henry Ofeciar, US Army: Died when insurgents attacked unit, Afghanistan
Antonio Ortiz, US Army: Stabbed outside bar off post, found dead in parking lot
Latoya Pitts, US Army: Convicted of involuntary manslaughter in fatal stabbing of Army boyfriend outside bar
Christian Quinones, US Army: Died of a gunshot wound to the abdomen off post
Castulo Salas, US Army: Sentenced to six months in military prison for shooting death of fellow soldier off post

2006
Jeffery Brown, US Army: Died when UH-60 Blackhawk crashed, Iraq
Steven Mennemeyer, US Army: Died when UH-60 Blackhawk crashed, Iraq

2005
Kyle Dennis, US Army: Sentenced to 5 years in prison for third-degree burglary, accessory to aggravated assault and attempted theft
Luke Hoffman, US Army: Sentenced to 5 years for attempted grand theft and two counts of aggravated assault
Seferino Reyna, US Army: Died when IED detonated near military vehicle, Iraq
Christopher Wilaby, US Army: Homicide of Echo Wiles, convicted in 2011
Echo Wiles, Civilian: Homicide victim of boyfriend, Army soldier

2004
Yoe Aneiros, US Army: Died when vehicle came under attack, Iraq
Pierre Cole, US Army: Arrested for the fatal shooting of store manager James Jung, 52, during a robbery in Chicago, held on $1.5 million bond
Eric Colvin, US Army: Charged with homicide, sentenced to 12 yrs on drug charges
David Heath, US Army: Died when patrol came under small arms, Iraq
Christopher Hymer, US Army: Homicide victim off post by Army soldier
Adriana Renteria, US Army Spouse: Alleged victim of domestic abuse
Carlos Renteria, US Army: Accused of domestic abuse, sent overseas, ordered to attend military anger management and alcohol abuse classes
Neil Santoriello, US Army: Died when IED detonated near military vehicle, Iraq
Daniel Shepherd, US Army: Died when military vehicle hit IED, Iraq
Aaron Stanley, US Army: Convicted of the premeditated murders of 2 Army soldiers, sentenced to life in prison/no parole
Matthew Werner, US Army: Homicide victim off post by Army soldier

2003
Christopher Cutchall, US Army: Died when IED detonated near vehicle, Iraq

2001
James Hawthorne, US Army: Shot in leg after someone shot 4 bullets in his vehicle
Shaun Leach, US Army: Died after someone shot 4 bullets into civilian vehicle
Jeremy Ware, US Army: Accused of attempted unpremeditated murder, carrying a concealed weapon, and wrongful acquisition of a firearm

1985
Francis Badame, US Army: Murdered after tricked and lured by two Army soldiers to go to a remote section of military post to hunt deer, buried in shallow grave
Timothy Keenan, US Army: Faced court-martial on murder and conspiracy charges & charged by state with conspiracy to commit first degree murder; plotted crossbow and beating death of Pvt. Francis Badame
Wayne Partridge Jr, US Army: Testified he shot Pvt. Francis Badame in the back with a crossbow and Timothy Keenan repeatedly beat Badame with a shovel

Related Links:
Two dead in Fort Riley shooting (1995)
2 Brothers May Face Explosives, Gun Charges (1995)
Troops in Distinguished Ft. Riley Unit Resent Notoriety From McVeigh Ties : Military: Present, former GIs of 16th Infantry angry over the tarnishing its record has received with the arrest of the prime bombing suspect. (1995)
Despite Army’s Assurances, Violence at Home (2008)
Child ‘Forrest Gump’ actor leaving Army (2008)
Army Alcoholics: More Soldiers Hitting the Bottle (2010)
One-fourth of killings in Sedgwick County since 1989 happened in 7 census tracts (2014)
Feds charge Kansas man with Fort Riley bomb plot (2015)
Kansas woman pleads guilty to sex trafficking a minor (2016)
Thousands of US troops deploying to Afghanistan, Europe this summer (2017)

Army Paratrooper Pfc. Andrew Young Found Dead in Barracks at Caserma Ederle in Vicenza, Italy; Under Investigation (2017)

US Army

Army paratrooper Pfc. Andrew Young, 21, was found dead in his barracks at Caserma Ederle in Vicenza, Italy on August 19, 2017. Pfc. Young joined the Army in 2015 and was assigned to the A Company, 1st Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment (Airborne), 173rd Airborne Brigade in Vicenza, Italy since January 2016. The incident is under investigation.

Related Links:
Army paratrooper found dead in Italy barracks
US paratrooper found dead on base in Italy is identified

Air Force TSgt. Jason Friday of Buckley AFB in Colorado Found Deceased; Under Investigation (2017)

USAF Seal

Related Links:
Active Duty Death
Buckley AFB airman found dead in Commerce City
Air Force man from Buckley found dead; investigation underway
Air Force man from Buckley found dead; investigation underway

Army Sgt. Jonathon Hunter and Spc. Christopher Harris Died After a Vehicle-Borne IED Detonated Near Their Convoy in Afghanistan (2017)

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Sgt. Jonathon Hunter, US Army, and Spc. Christopher Harris, US Army

Sgt. Jonathon Hunter, 23, and Spc. Christopher Harris, 25, died as a result of injuries sustained when a vehicle-borne improved explosive device (IED) detonated near their convoy on August 2, 2017 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Sgt. Hunter and Spc. Harris were supporting Operation Inherent Resolve on behalf of the 2nd Battalion, 504th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. According the the Department of Defense press release the incident is under investigation.

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Army Casualties
Two members of 82nd Airborne killed in Afghanistan
Military identifies Fort Bragg soldiers killed in Afghanistan suicide bomb attack
Columbus, Ind., soldier among 2 killed in Afghanistan attack
Specialist Christopher Harris: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Father: Indiana soldier among 2 killed in Afghanistan attack
Fundraiser for pregnant wife of soldier killed in Afghanistan nets $12,000 in four hours

Army Pfc. Hansen Kirkpatrick Died in an Indirect Fire Attack in Helmand Province, Afghanistan (2017)

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Pfc. Hansen Kirkpatrick, US Army

Army Pfc. Hansen Kirkpatrick, 19, died from wounds received during an indirect fire attack on July 3, 2017 in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. Pfc. Kirkpatrick was supporting Operation Freedom Sentinel on behalf of the 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division in Fort Bliss, Texas. According to the Department of Defense press release, the incident is under investigation.

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Army Casualty
US soldier killed in Afghanistan is identified
Pentagon identifies soldier killed in indirect fire attack in Afghanistan
Hansen Kirkpatrick: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Death of U.S. soldier in Afghanistan highlights the evolving role of conventional combat troops there
Valley rallies for its military members
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non-Combat Death at Fort Bliss, Texas (US Army)

Retired Army Veteran Marinna Rollins Shot & Killed Estranged Husband’s Dog with New Boyfriend; Less Then Two Weeks After Arrested & Charged, She Committed Suicide (2017)

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Marinna Rollins, US Army Retired

Army veteran Marinna Rollins, 23, was found dead of an apparent suicide on May 7, 2017 in Fayetteville, North Carolina. According to reports, Rollins was medically retired from the Army with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after a traumatic event while stationed in South Korea. Rollins was involved in the execution style killing of her estranged husband’s dog Huey around April 16 or 17. The harrowing incident was filmed and released to the public resulting in worldwide coverage. Marinna and her accomplice, Jarren Heng, were both facing felony charges in court. Jarren Heng is an active duty soldier stationed at Fort Bragg and he still faces felony charges, although the conspiracy charge was dropped after Marinna died. Meanwhile a Facebook page was created called Justice for Huey and they are also petitioning the Army to take action. According to Marinna’s estranged husband, Matt Dyer, Marinna was watching the dog for him while he was in South Korea but at some point decided she wanted to keep the dog and didn’t want to give Huey back. Meanwhile, she registered the dog as an emotional support animal. Matt shared that he was okay with her keeping the dog because he thought Huey would be good for her PTSD. Matt and Justice for Huey have been empathetic of Marinna and believe that had Jarren Heng never entered her life, this would not have happened. Matt expressed that he was aware that Jarren hated Huey and was controlling of Marinna. Marinna and Matt grew up together in Windham, Maine and were still technically married as their divorce had not been finalized yet. Initially it appears that Marinna did try and find a home for the dog with no success. Matt thinks Jarren Heng convinced Marinna to get rid of the dog. Did Jarren Heng pressure her to get rid of the dog because it was her soon to be ex-husband’s dog? We may never know the answer to that question but nonetheless this is a very heartbreaking situation: an innocent dog lost a life, another soldier with Post Traumatic Stress lost her life, and Matt lost his childhood friend & wife and his dog.

Related Links:
Justice for Huey on Facebook
Petition: To Seek UCMJ Punishment of Army Specialist Jarren Heng
Owner of dog slain by veteran and soldier speaks out on what really happened
Accused dog killer’s sister, separated husband still trying to process ‘shocking’ incident
Marinna Rollins & Jarren Heng: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Army veteran from Maine accused of brutally killing service dog
Vet And Her Soldier Boyfriend Shot Dog 10 Times, New Report Shows
A Veteran Tied Her Service Dog to a Tree and Shot It 5 Times, Officials Say
Cops: Ex-soldier kills her service dog while her boyfriend videotapes
Prosecutor: NC military couple laughed as they fatally shot service dog
Army vet, boyfriend laugh while killing PTSD service dog, DA says
Army vet and special ops soldier boyfriend charged with shooting her service dog
Veteran Charged with Tying PTSD Service Dog to Tree, Shooting 5 Times
Bail raised for veteran, soldier accused in execution of veteran’s PTSD therapy dog
Army veteran who filmed herself killing her own service dog gets bail increase to $25K
Marinna Rollins army vet: Why I filmed myself shooting my service dog dead 5 times
Veteran who shot service dog on video found dead
Army vet who killed her service dog is found dead
Female soldier caught on video killing dog found DEAD
Marinna Rollins: Ex-Soldier Recorded Shooting Service Dog Found Dead
Windham veteran accused of executing therapy dog, posting video on Facebook, found dead
Marinna Rollins, ex-soldier who was recorded fatally shooting service dog, is found dead
Army veteran kills herself after being filmed tying service dog to tree and shooting it dead
Army veteran accused of murdering service dog commits suicide nine days before trial
Female army veteran ‘who tied her PTSD dog to a tree and killed it is found dead’
Veteran arrested in dog’s killing on Facebook found dead
Army Veteran Arrested For Murdering Her Dog Commits Suicide
Sad end to grisly episode: Ex-soldier who killed dog is found dead

Huey, Matt Dyer’s Beloved Dog

Marinna-Rollins

Huey of Fayetteville, North Carolina

Fort Bragg Army soldier Matt Dyer’s dog Huey passed away in Fayetteville, North Carolina on April 16 or 17, 2017 (the exact date is unknown). Matt’s childhood friend and estranged wife, Marinna Rollins, was watching Huey for him while he was stationed in South Korea. Unfortunately, at some point Marinna and her current boyfriend, Jarren Heng, also a Fort Bragg Army soldier, decided they were going to kill Huey. The two filmed the event, it was released to the public, and went viral resulting in outrage from around the world. Less then two weeks after the news hit the airwaves and the two were charged and arrested, Marinna Rollins committed suicide. Matt Dyer is devastated by the loss of both Huey and his wife and childhood friend from Maine. Marinna was medically discharged from the Army and diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress, Bi-Polar, and other mental illnesses after a traumatic event in South Korea. Matt thought Huey would be good for Marinna, who was a disabled veteran and even registered Huey as an emotional support animal. Keep up with the latest developments in Jarren Heng’s animal abuse case and other news at Justice for Huey on Facebook.

Air Force SSgt Mario Manago Concerned About Commander Bias with Non-Judicial Punishment; Referred to Court Martial & Booted with Federal Crime on Record (2017)


A U.S. Air Force veteran airman says he was recently let go from his job because was six minutes late to a meeting with his commander. Mario Manago, 33, has been with the Air Force for 12 years and stationed at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst for seven of them. Last August, Manago asked to speak with his commander about mistreatment at the base. Manago said he was late to that meeting because things became busy at work. Months later, Manago was convicted at court-martial months later in March for failing to go to his “appointed place of duty.” A week prior, Manago was demoted from staff sergeant to airman. The U.S. Air Force said Manago was honorably discharged because of tenure rules. -Chasing News

“I wanted to retire from the Air Force.” -Mario Manago

Related Links:
NJ Airman Convicted of the Federal Crime of Being 6 Minutes Late for a Meeting
‘I am a felon for being 6 minutes late to a meeting,’ court-martialed airman says
Former Airman Considers Options After Discharge
Advocacy group accuses military justice system of racial bias
Report finds racial disparities in military justice system
The Military Justice System Has A Race Problem, According To DoD Data
Black soldiers face US military justice more often than whites, study finds
Black Troops More Likely to Face Military Punishment Than Whites, New Report Says
In Every Service Branch, Black Troops More Likely to Be Punished by Commanders, Courts: Report
CAAFlog: Racial bias in military justice
Corruption in the Ranks: McGuire IG Wrongly Dismisses NCO’s Reprisal Complaint

Massachusetts School of Law Interviews Veteran Jennifer Norris About Violent Crime in the Military & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Massachusetts School of Law explored violent crime in the military with Jennifer Norris, Military Justice for All, and the impact it has on civilians too. Jennifer talked about her experiences with four different perpetrators within the first two years of her enlisted career, the reporting & adjudication process, and the retaliation that ensued and eventually ended a fifteen year career. Also discussed was the jurisdictional hurdles that arise with a transient population like the military. For example, Jennifer was not able to press charges against one perpetrator because he moved out of state after learning he was getting reported. Another perpetrator was active duty Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, therefore a state National Guard commander did not have jurisdiction of a federal employee. And finally, although Jennifer was able to move forward with two other cases involving high ranking National Guard members with over eighteen years of service, unlike the civilian world, after the cases were adjudicated, they retired with full military retirement benefits and no public records.

Jennifer also shared that although the Department of Defense downplays violent crime in the military and sexual assault appears to be closely monitored by some female members of Congress, everything is not under control. The crime appears to be escalating. The military doesn’t just have a sexual assault issue, they have a domestic violence and homicide issue as well. They also have a pattern of ruling soldier’s deaths both stateside and overseas as suicides, training accidents, and illness despite families strongly protesting and evidence revealing otherwise. Domestic violence is more likely to lead to homicide and unfortunately the two issues have not been given the attention they deserve because until you do the research yourself and see how many families and communities have been impacted by the crimes, suspicious death, and homicide of a soldier or civilian, you wouldn’t know because Congress and the main stream media do not give it the attention it deserves. Homicide and independent investigations of all suspicious deaths should be given the highest priority not only because people have lost their lives and families deserve answers but because someone needs to be held accountable. We must prevent others from becoming victims of these crimes too.

Jennifer discussed the lasting impacts the crimes and retaliation had on her. Jennifer was empowered after doing all that she could do to protect others from getting harmed by the same people, but her squadron did not see it the same way. After the cases were adjudicated, Jennifer faced hostility from a couple of the perpetrator’s friends and her Chain of Command once she returned back to work. She eventually had to transfer to another squadron. It was the professional and personal retaliation that made her start feeling more intense feelings of anxiety, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. And unfortunately her next squadron wasn’t any more welcoming then the last. She was told shortly after arriving that ‘no female makes it in the satellite communications work center’ and that she was experiencing hostility from her new Chain of Command because the old squadron called and informed them she was a ‘troublemaker.’ The retaliation had a direct impact on her mental health and cemented an already traumatizing experience with further abuse, indifference, and judgement. By the time she got to her third squadron (almost ten years after the first attack), she learned that the Department of Veterans Affairs treated Post Traumatic Stress resulting from military sexual trauma.

After Jennifer informed her third squadron that she was getting help for the PTS at the Department of Veterans Affairs, she was immediately red flagged and asked to leave the squadron until she could produce a note from her doctor giving her permission to be at work. She did this and jumped through the other hoops asked of her in an attempt to save her career but lost confidentiality in the process. Jennifer walked away from her career in the end because she refused to release her VA records for a security clearance investigation. The entire experience not only opened her up to judgement again (simply because she asked for some counseling due to what someone else did) but she had to prove that she was ‘fit for duty’ while the perpetrators were enjoying full military retirement benefits. Jennifer chose a second chance at a civilian career when she refused to release her confidential VA records for her security clearance investigation because she wanted to ensure a future free of a tainted security clearance. It makes zero sense that someone who is a victim of crime be negatively impacted by the crimes of others in yet another way. The hypocrisy of the system is truly revealed when you look at how the perpetrators were let off the hook but the victim of crime loses their military career because they had the strength to first report and then eventually ask for help.