Four Service Members on Military Death Row at Fort Leavenworth, Army Private John Bennett was Last Military Execution by Hanging in 1961

US Army

John Bennett, US Army (Austria)

A look at the last U.S. soldier executed by the military (1961)

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Timothy Hennis, US Army (Fort Bragg, North Carolina)

Timothy Hennis, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Court for the Murders of Air Force Spouse Kathryn Eastburn & Two of her Three Children (1985)

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Ronald Gray, US Army (Fort Bragg, North Carolina)

Ronald Gray, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Court for the Rape & Murder of Army Private Laura Vickery-Clay & Civilian Kimberly Ruggles (1986)

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Dwight Loving, US Army (Fort Hood, Texas)

President Barack Obama commuted Dwight Loving’s Death Sentence Before Leaving Office in 2017, Sentenced to Life in Prison with No Parole (1988)

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Hasan Akbar, US Army (Fort Bragg, North Carolina)

Sergeant Hasan Akbar, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Court for a Grenade & Rifle Attack on Fellow Soldiers in Kuwait Resulting in Two Deaths & Several Injuries (2003)

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Andrew Witt, US Air Force (Robins AFB, Georgia)

SrA Andrew Witt Sentenced to Death for Murders of Jamie & Andy Schliepsiek at Robins Air Force Base; Military Appeals Court Grants New Sentencing Hearing in July 2016 (2004)

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Major Nidal Hasan, US Army (Fort Hood, Texas)

Major Nidal Hasan, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Court for Opening Fire & Killing 12 Unarmed Soldiers and 1 DoD Employee at Fort Hood, Texas (2009)

Major Nidal Hasan, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Court for Opening Fire & Killing 12 Unarmed Soldiers and 1 DoD Employee at Fort Hood, Texas (2009)

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Major Nidal Hasan, US Army

Major Nidal Hasan, US Army, was sentenced to death by a military court for killing thirteen people and wounding 30 others at Fort Hood, Texas on November 5, 2009. Major Hasan was a military officer employed as a psychiatrist and nearly all of the victims of his crimes were unarmed soldiers. This was the worst mass murder at a U.S. military installation. Hasan was armed with a semi-automatic pistol, shouted “Allahu Akbar” (God is great), and then opened fire at a crowd inside a Fort Hood deployment and medical screening processing center. The massacre lasted about 10 minutes before Hasan was shot by civilian police and taken into custody. The shooting spree left 12 service members and one Department of Defense employee dead. Reviews by the Pentagon and a U.S. Senate panel found Hasan’s superiors had continued to promote him despite the fact that concerns had been raised over his behavior. His behavior suggested that he had become a radical and potentially violent Islamic extremist. On August 23, 2013, a jury found Hasan guilty of 45 counts of premeditated murder and attempted premeditated murder. He was sentenced to death for his crimes and sits on death row at Fort Leavenworth with five other service members: Timothy HennisRonald GrayDwight LovingAndrew Witt, and Hasan Akbar.

Learn more: Nidal Hasan, and the 5 other men on the military’s death row

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SrA Andrew Witt Sentenced to Death for Murders of Jamie & Andy Schliepsiek at Robins Air Force Base in 2004; Military Appeals Court Grants New Sentencing Hearing in 2016

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Andrew Witt, US Air Force

Andrew Witt, US Air Force, murdered Airman Andy Schliepsiek and his wife Jamie at Robins Air Force Base in Georgia. According to reports, Andrew Witt made a ‘pass’ at Andy’s wife Jamie at a July 4th cookout. When Andy confronted Witt about the inappropriate sexual advance, he informed him that he would not only report the assault to their Commander but also that he was sleeping with an officer on base. This was motive enough for Andrew Witt to drive back on base and stab them to death in the early morning hours of July 5th. Another airman Jason King was also stabbed in the back as he was attempting to flee the scene. In 2005, Andrew Witt was found guilty of first degree murder and sentenced to the death penalty by a military court. After an appeal, the death sentence was overturned in 2013. In early 2016, the death sentence for Andrew Witt was reinstated. On July 19, 2016, the highest military appeals court ruled in favor of a new sentencing hearing for Andrew Witt. Prior to this decision, Witt was the only Air Force service member on death row at Leavenworth. He had joined five other Army soldiers: Timothy Hennis, Ronald Gray, Hasan AkbarNidal Hasan, and Dwight Loving (whose death sentence was commuted by President Barack Obama in 2017).

Learn more: Nidal Hasan, and the 5 other men on the military’s death row

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Sergeant Hasan Akbar, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Court for Grenade & Rifle Attacks on Fellow Soldiers in Kuwait Resulting in Two Deaths & Several Injuries (2003)

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Hasan Akbar, US Army

Sergeant Hasan Akbar, US Army, was sentenced to death by the military courts in 2005 for the March 23, 2003 grenade and rifle attacks on his fellow soldiers at Camp Pennsylvania in Kuwait. Akbar was accused of rolling hand grenades inside tents at a military command center and then opening fire. Army Captain Christopher Scott Seifert and Air Force Major Gregory L. Stone died in the attacks and fourteen others were wounded in the chaotic grenade and rifle attack. According to testimony, Akbar had been repeatedly disciplined by Army leadership for insubordination and it was also learned from his own diary entries that he carefully planned the attacks to result in maximum carnage. It appeared that Akbar targeted senior command staff and his motive was to stop US soldiers from harming his fellow Muslims. He was convicted of premeditated first degree murder. Akbar continues to appeal his death sentence and as of 2016 he has requested that the US Supreme Court hear his case in an attempt to reverse the death sentence imposed by the UCMJ. Hasan Akbar currently sits on death row at Fort Leavenworth prison in Kansas with three other service members: Timothy HennisRonald Gray, and Nidal Hasan.

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Army Soldier Dwight Loving Sentenced to Death for Robbery, Attempted Murder, & Two Murders; President Obama Commuted Death Sentence, Sentenced to Life (1988)

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Dwight Loving, US Army

A military judge sentenced Army soldier Dwight Loving, 20, to death for the murders of two Killeen, Texas cab drivers and the attempted murder of a third. Loving was found guilty April 3, 1989 of two counts of felony murder in the deaths of Army Private Christopher Fay, 20, a 13th Corps Support Command soldier and part-time Killeen cab driver, and retired Master Sgt. Bobby Sharbino, 44. The two men were found dead in their taxis on December 12 and December 13, 1988, both victims of gunshot wounds. Howard Harrison, 28, another cab driver, was injured when he struggled with Loving in his cab. Harrison managed to escape after knocking the gun from Lovings hand. The court also found Loving guilty of robbing two 7-Eleven convenience stores on December 11, 1988. Dwight Loving was one of six service members on military death row at Fort Leavenworth in Kansas which included Andrew WittRonald Gray, Timothy Hennis, Hasan Akbar, and Nidal Hasan. Although Andrew Witt has since been granted a new sentencing trial and President Barack Obama commuted Loving’s death sentence before he left Office. Loving has been sentenced to life in prison without parole. According to the terms of the commutation agreement, Loving will be unable to appeal his conviction or be eligible in any way for release in the future

Learn more: Nidal Hasan, and the 5 other men on the military’s death row

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Ronald Gray, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Courts for the Rape & Murder of Army Private Laura Vickery-Clay & Civilian Kimberly Ruggles (1986)

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Ronald Gray, US Army

Ronald Gray, US Army, was sentenced to death in 1988 by a military court for the rape and premeditated murders of Army Private Laura Lee Vickery-Clay in December 1986 and civilian Kimberly Ann Ruggles in January 1987. He was also convicted of raping Army Private Mary Ann Lang Nameth and leaving her for dead in January 1987. Ronald Gray’s scheduled execution is one of two scheduled in the military since 1961. Army Private John Bennett was the last soldier to be executed by the US military. Bennett was convicted of rape and the attempted murder of an 11 year old Austrian girl. He was hanged in 1961 at Fort Leavenworth prison in Kansas. Ronald Gray joined Timothy Hennis, another Fort Bragg soldier convicted of rape and the murders of Air Force spouse Kathryn Eastburn and two of her three daughters in 1985. In 2008, President George Bush granted the final approval necessary for the military to execute Ronald Gray. After Gray’s execution was delayed for eight years, media reports indicated in December 2016 that the Armed Forces courts will no longer grant stays of execution and the federal government made an announcement that they plan to move forward with the lethal injection execution of Ronald Gray. Gray is one of six service members on death row at Fort Leavenworth. He joins Timothy Hennis, Dwight LovingAndrew Witt, Hasan Akbar, and Nidal Hasan.

Learn more: Nidal Hasan, and the 5 other men on the military’s death row

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Timothy Hennis, US Army, Sentenced to Death by Military Court for the Murders of Air Force Spouse Kathryn Eastburn & Two of her Three Children (1985)

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Timothy Hennis, US Army

In 1985, a young military officer’s wife and two of her three little girls were viciously murdered in their home. Kathryn Eastburn was also raped. The crime occurred six miles from the location of where Jeffrey MacDonald was accused of killing his wife and two children on the base at Fort Bragg. US Army sergeant Timothy Hennis became a suspect from the beginning. In a background check, they found that he had 3 convictions for writing bad checks. Eventually he was tried and found guilty of the murders of Katie, Cara, and Erin Eastburn and sentenced to death by the civilian authorities in North Carolina. But he appealed and was found not guilty. After his acquittal, he joined the US Army again for two more tours, worked his way up to E-8, and retired as a MSgt from Fort Lewis, Washington. DNA evidence eventually linked Hennis to the crime of Air Force officer Gary Eastburn’s wife in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Civilian prosecutors could not charge Hennis due to double jeopardy; but the US military could. As a result, he was ordered back into service due to his retirement status. Hennis tried to claim consensual sex which contradicted original testimony. Seventeen years later, the military found him guilty of three counts of murder and he was sentenced to death. Hennis sits on death row at Leavenworth with five other service members: Ronald Gray, Dwight Loving, Andrew WittHasan Akbar, and Nidal Hasan.

Learn more: Nidal Hasan, and the 5 other men on the military’s death row

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In 1985, a young military wife and two of her three little girls are viciously murdered in their home. In a twisted case filled with unusual suspects, the man who gets convicted goes free. But nothing is what it seems. -Discovery ID