Army Reserves Veteran Micah Johnson Responsible for Police Officer Shootings in Dallas, Texas (2016)

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Micah Johnson, US Army Reserves

Micah Johnson, a US Army Reserves veteran, is accused of gunning down and murdering five Dallas police officers during a Black Lives Matter Event on July 8, 2016. This is considered one of the deadliest attacks on police officers since September 11, 2001. He was eventually killed in a stand off with police. In recent media reports we learned that Micah Johnson deployed to Afghanistan from November 2013 to July 2014. He was accused of sexual harassment while deployed to Afghanistan in May 2014. He was accused of stalking and stealing women’s underwear as well. The victim sought a protection order and told superiors he needed mental health treatment. The protection order was granted and the Commanding officer recommended an Other Than Honorable discharge and sent him home early from his deployment to Afghanistan. Johnson’s military attorney stated that this kind of punishment is unusual for an isolated incident of sexual harassment. As part of a tentative agreement, it was recommended that Johnson receive a general discharge which saves the Army time and resources needed to discharge soldiers under Other Than Honorable conditions. Instead he was eventually released from the Army with a honorable discharge in April 2015.

As a result of his actions while serving, he was not investigated and prosecuted but instead sent back home from overseas and discharged from the US Army Reserves honorably. Although we have limited information in which to base conclusions, at first glance this looks like a case of escalation of predatory behavior that starts with sexual harassment, progresses to stalking, then the individual gets brazen and starts breaking and entering to steal his victims belongings. It would only be a matter of time before the individual escalated to sexual assault, rape and then murder. It’s too early to make a definitive conclusion as we are still waiting for information to come in because this story is developing. But one thing we do know is that the US Army Reserves took the easy way out, booted Micah Johnson from the military to protect it’s service members, and unleashed him on society with no warning or records. This case is another reason why we need the military to investigate and process each and every case through the legal system so we at least have a fighting chance at prevention and escalation of crimes. If the military can’t handle or afford to investigate and prosecute each case to determine the soldier’s danger to society, then maybe they should hand over the investigation and prosecution of crimes to the civilians. This isn’t the first case they let slip through the cracks and it certainly won’t be the last.

America’s Love-Hate Affair With Snipers
Army report: Grenade found in room of Dallas gunman in 2014
Army investigation found problems with soldier who became Dallas police killer
Dallas shooter called mentally unstable back in 2011 in Mesquite police report
Army launches internal review of Dallas shooter Micah Johnson’s military record
Who was Micah Johnson? A more complex picture emerges
‘I just wanted a piece of him’: College officers pushed through injuries in Dallas shooting
Military Snipers: Dallas Shooter NO “Sniper”
When Army career ended in disgrace, Dallas gunman was ostracized
During Army days, Dallas shooter was a mediocre marksman
‘Kind of goofy’: Friends recall Dallas gunman’s personality
Still No Explanation for Dallas Gunman’s Honorable Discharge
Dallas cop killer Micah Johnson was BLACKLISTED by black militant group two years ago after background check branded him ‘unfit for recruitment’
The Dallas Shooter Wanted To Stay In This Anti-Semitic Black Militant Group
Dallas Shooter Faced Sexual-Harassment Allegations in Army, Military Lawyer Says
The latest: President Obama orders flags lowered to half-staff
Officer killed in Dallas shootings had survived 3 tours in Iraq
Dallas Police shooting: Victims served in Navy & Marine Corps, suspect had been in Army
The Dallas Shooting Suspect Had Military Experience
Dallas Shooter Accused Of Sexual Harassment In Army
Dallas gunman studied ‘shoot and move’ tactics, black nationalism
Dallas Shooter Micah Johnson Was Accused of Sexual Harassment During His Military Days
The female soldier who ‘pervert’ Dallas cop killer sexually harassed as colleague reveals murderer used to ‘steal girls’ panties’
Fellow soldier accused Dallas shooter of sexual harassment
Dallas police killer ‘sexually harassed woman soldier who warned he was unstable and pleaded for protection’
Dallas shooter stockpiled weapons and was accused of harassment
What we know about the suspected shooter in Dallas
‘Loner’ Dallas gunman had bomb materials and kept journal of combat tactics
Dallas gunman Micah Johnson honed tactics at local combat school
Dallas officers shot to death include newlywed, Iraq veteran
Neighbor recalls his conversation with the Dallas shooter
Meet the Remotec Andros Mark V-A1, the robot that killed the Dallas shooter
Dallas suspect taunted police during 2 hours of negotiation
Dallas sniper shooting: 5 police officers slain, suspect ID’d as Army vet Micah Johnson

Alaska National Guard Updates Military Justice Code (2016)

National GuardSexual Assault Prevention and Response Program

Alaska National Guard unit being investigated for allegations of sexual misconduct
Alaska National Guard Responds to Allegations of Sexual Assault
Alleged Alaska National Guard Sexual Assault Victim Speaks Out
National Guard Sexual Assault Survivor Speaks Out
Rape victim says Alaska National Guard violated her confidentiality
Scathing report on Alaska National Guard forces out commander
The Three-Headed Monster
Alaska National Guard recruiter fights accusations of misconduct
Alaska National Guard Sex Abuse Scandal Threatens GOP Governor’s Re-election
National Guard documents detail chronic misconduct among recruiting leaders
Alaska National Guard condoned ‘weapons smuggling, rape, and drug trafficking’
Alaska Gov. Walker names new Guard adjutant general
First woman commander of Alaska National Guard: ‘no old boys network’
It’s time for action to protect our Alaska National Guard
State releases 4,000-plus email pages in Alaska National Guard scandal
Special Investigator’s Report on Alaska National Guard Sexual Harassment and Abuse Issues
Report: Inadequate records kept of National Guard complaints
Report cites command climate problems in Alaska Guard probe
Alaska National Guard investigation results confirm mishandling of complaints
National Guard pilot’s experience as sexual assault victim singled out
Investigator calls for Alaska National Guard reform on sexual assaults
Broken Trust: How whistle-blowers and victims in the Alaska National Guard went unheard
Alaska National Guard calls for new military code
Alaska National Guard presses lawmakers to adopt new military code
Alaska House passes bill updating military justice code
In wake of National Guard scandal, House passes reforms to Alaska military justice code
Alaska House of Representatives Unanimously Approves Code of Military Justice for the Alaska National Guard
Alaska Code of Military Justice: HB 126 and the Alaska National Guard
Legislation: Alaska House Bill 60: Military: Sexual Assault
Governor Walker Applauds Adoption of Alaska Code of Military Justice
Governor to sign update to Alaska’s military justice code

Link

USAF SealFear of retaliation: The culture that prevents airmen from speaking up

They accused superiors of assault and harassment, now their careers are over.

Victims “tell me they don’t come forward for a number of reasons. They feel personally ashamed. They feel that they may be blamed for what has happened. They do fear retaliation, sometimes from chain of command, sometimes from their buddies in the unit.”

Read more: http://www.airforcetimes.com/article/20131007/NEWS/310070009/Fear-of-retaliation-The-culture-that-prevents-airmen-from-speaking-up

Why do we need the Military Justice Improvement Act?

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Retaliation

Because more than 86% of service members assaulted do NOT report it. Help us pass the MJIA. Contact your
Senators and Representatives and ask them to reform the military justice system and provide victims with a new place to report their crimes. Please sign this petition: http://www.change.org/petitions/u-s-congress-demand-justice-for-military-sexual-trauma-victims-support-s-967?utm_source=supporter_message&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=petition_message_notice

Why I Support the STOP Act (H.R. 3435)

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Representative Jackie Speier (D-CA) & Jennifer Norris, USAF Retired

The STOP Act, Sexual Assault Training Oversight and Prevention Act, would establish an independent professional legal entity separate from the chain of command of the Department of Defense. Until very recently, sexual assault investigations were under the control of and conducted by the Commander. The Commander had the power to decide to pursue justice or not and to what level he elevated it. Leon Panetta, Secretary of Defense, has recently declared that he is taking the power to investigate out of the hands of the Commanders and giving it to an O-6 or higher in the Chain of Command. My initial reaction is that there is an automatic conflict of interest with that and that the investigation can still be stifled if kept within the Chain of Command. The STOP Act would help to provide a form of checks and balances and put the case in the hands of a professional so that the investigation is handled appropriately. It is imperative that these cases be handled effectively in order to prevent further emotional and physical harm to the victims of such crimes.

In my efforts to educate the public via mostly social media, my fellow advocacy peers and I have come across rape apologists. My initial reaction is that these vocal dissenters of justice are the perpetrators themselves but after seeing so many various reactions to the topic, I am led to believe that there is a widespread misconception out there about the crime, the perpetrators, and the victims of sexual assault. For some reason, the white elephant in the room is that most claims of sexual assault are bogus reports. Today I was reminded by a fellow soldier (not the norm) that victims of rape claim rape to avoid charges of adultery. Who would know about that aside from the rapists and those unfortunate victims who happen to get caught up in this web of destruction? I never would have imagined this kind of response to a person who had the courage to report this crime. My day was somewhat planned until I woke up to this kind of mentality once again.

Instead of turning the other way and doing nothing, I decided to take this opportunity to educate others about the issue since there really is no arguing with idiots. At this point, it isn’t about what the rape apologists have to say; its about the truth. The truth is that most reports of sexual assault are not bogus reports. If there are any cases of bogus reports, they are definitely not the norm and don’t even compare to the number of sexual assaults. By the DoD’s own estimates there are roughly 3,192 sexual assaults reported a year in the military. These DoD estimates are staggering. Although Secretary Panetta estimates that the number is closer to 19,000 a year; most of them go unreported. And for those who have been victims of sexual assault or rape in the military, you understand clearly why one would be hesitant to report. It has devastating effects on your career, and in some cases reporting this crime is a career ender.

Although I pressed charges against two of the four perpetrators I crossed paths with within the first two years of my career, justice was still not served. I thought at the time that justice was served but after seeing how things played out and learning more about the issue, I see that my case clearly falls into the typical way that sexual assault investigations are handled in the military. The threshold for punishment is one of pity for the perpetrator because of how the report might affect their career, therefore they are not dealt the punishment that fits the crime. I must preface by stating that my Commander handled the situation pretty well. Unfortunately, this is not the norm. I have read countless stories about military rape victims who have sought justice only to be met with disbelief. In addition, they are treated like the enemy afterwards and their lives become a living hell. Not only are they forced to work with their rapist but they are forced psychologically to handle a situation that no one would wish on their worst enemy. Imagine the psychological trauma that results from getting raped by a fellow soldier and then having to work with or for that individual the next day.

In my case, one of the men who was sexually assaulting me was my NCOIC (Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge). He was my boss therefore he had the power to tell me what to do and when to do it. I was an E-4 and he was an E-7. He had the power to make me a “warehouse manager” in an effort to isolate me so that he could prey on me when we were alone. If he told me to work in the warehouse that day, then I worked in the warehouse. If he told me to do anything, I had to do it because otherwise it was, “disobeying a direct order” or “disrespect to an NCO”. I knew that if I did not comply with him that he could affect the outcome of my promotions, temporary duty assignments, work responsibilities, and general overall health. I was totally enslaved to this man because I didn’t want to risk the harm that came from reporting a sexual predator to the chain of command. Eventually, I didn’t have a choice but to report but it was not until after I was completely broken.

I went from “superior performer” to I don’t give a crap. I went from I want to retire with the military to I want out of here as soon as I can. I went from being happy and energetic to being totally sad and completely wiped out emotionally. I never imagined in a million years how negatively this would affect my psyche. I now understood why it is illegal and considered a crime to touch another person’s body, force yourself on another person, and/or make derogatory, sexual, belittling comments to another human being. I felt like my hard work and efforts meant nothing. I felt like I existed mainly for the purpose of the perpetrators pleasure. I felt like no matter how hard I worked or how much I learned that none of it mattered. It was like banging my head against a brick wall. Others noticed how hard I worked but the one person that controlled my career just happened to be a sexual predator.

For those who have been in the military, you understand how important the Chain of Command is. You also know that it is required that you report to your Chain of Command and attempt to resolve all issues at the lowest level possible. So what do you do when the person who is assaulting you is in your Chain of Command? I was approached by a Senior Non-Commissioned Officer (E-7), outside my Chain of Command, who noticed that I had changed. He observed that I went from loving the military to not caring about anything. After being approached by this professional man who genuinely cared, it opened the flood gates. I finally broke down after months of attempting to handle the situation on my own with no success and told him what I had been dealing with on an almost daily basis. I was scared of my boss and no longer wanted to be subjected to his abuse and assaults.

My NCOIC purposefully set me up to be alone with him. And, his predator ways escalated over time. After assigning me to tasks that put me in isolated positions, he would then show up and make his move. For example, I was the warehouse manager, so he assigned me to clean up and organize the warehouse. I welcomed the challenge of the work but dreaded the isolated moments that he took advantage of. He grabbed me, pushed himself on me, groped me, and tried to force me to be physical and intimate with him. I would fight him off and fight back. I professionally, assertively, and angrily told him not to touch me on numerous occasions. He would not take no for an answer and he would get angry with me after I rejected his advances. I was told that I should feel privileged that he was interested in me, that I was a bitch, and that he didn’t want me anyway because I had small tits. So in addition to having my body violated, I was belittled and yelled at because I would not comply with his demands. This didn’t happen once or twice. This happened on numerous occasions, if not daily at times. He escalated over time and became more angry, sneaky, manipulative, and forceful.

Had this man not had control over my career, I would have ceased the behavior sooner. But because I was trying to safeguard my career while politely (and not so politely) trying to reject his advances, I was always scared that he would abuse his power. He had the power to write me up, talk bad about me to leadership, and hinder promotion, in addition to taking advantage of me. I felt like I was under his complete control and I worked every day trying to be perfect so that he could not use anything against me. Unfortunately, because he started to escalate and exhibit his behaviors in front of others, and no one said anything, it made me feel even more alone. I felt like I had nowhere to turn. I couldn’t turn to my Chain of Command because he was in my Chain of Command. I did not even think about reporting the sexual assaults to my Commander because the Chain of Command was so adamant about resolving issues at the lowest level possible. I also knew that if I reported this man for sexually assaulting me that my career would be over. And, in fact it was.

Everyone in my Chain of Command was informed after I reported the assault. It was protocol to keep my supervisor, the Chief, the Officer-in-Charge, and the perpetrator informed at all times. The Commander knew everything and it was his responsibility to keep the others in my Chain of Command informed with what was happening with one of their troops and the Superintendent of Maintenance. It was humiliating. And, instead of being supported through the process, I was judged, isolated, and basically run out. During the investigation, I was transferred out of the squadron. I agreed to the transfer because I could no longer handle being under the control of my NCOIC or in the same room with him. He had assaulted me on so many occasions that I was traumatized. I never knew when I was going to be put in a position where I had to fight him off. All I could think was why can’t I just come to work and work? Why do I have to deal with this? How do I make it stop?

The enacting of the STOP Act would provide me with a place to turn to, someone to advocate for me, and emotional help. Although my Commander did the best he could to investigate the situation professionally, it put all parties involved in a difficult position. Most crimes are investigated by professionals who went to school to learn the art of investigation, forensics, and crime scene analysis. Commanders have a full-time job with their existing responsibilities, let alone investigating a sexual assault claim. At the time, there was no help for me. It was so unbelievable to me that I would get assaulted by another in uniform, prove this, and not be offered any kind of mental health services. As a matter of fact, I had to pay for these services out of pocket. And because I was having such a hard time coping with the assaults, coping with the long, drawn out investigation process, and then coping with the retaliatory behavior by others in the Squadron, I was devastated. I had no choice but to turn to a professional for help. I had never been exposed to this kind of behavior and quite frankly didn’t even know what it was.

The STOP Act will hold perpetrators accountable, investigate the crimes, prosecute fairly, and provide checks and balances in the system. If this felony crime wasn’t so devastating, we would not have to create a special office to handle it but it is. It is not only devastating to the victim but to the Squadron or Unit as a whole. Morale was turned upside down after I reported the crime and the Commander launched an investigation. It was a small unit and the rumor mill started almost immediately. I was so ashamed of what had occurred that I was not interested in talking about the situation with anyone. Quite frankly, it was embarrassing and I wanted to put it behind me and move on. Unfortunately, others became fearful of me because they were not aware of what truly occurred. They were told that they had to be careful around me, that I was a troublemaker, and that I was a traitor. I never expected that response. I never expected that I would be betrayed in that way.

I would have preferred that the investigation be handled outside the Squadron. I would have preferred that the case be handled discreetly. I would have preferred that I was offered mental health services. I would have preferred that both of us leave the squadron to prevent one or the other from talking about the circumstances in order to gain support. Removing the investigation from the Chain of Command would have changed the entire dynamic of the situation. The STOP Act emphasizes an importance on human rights, discourages criminal activity, encourages professionalism in the investigation, ensures the best possible outcome for a conviction that holds up, and prevents others from becoming a victim of that perpetrator as well. Criminal investigations are handled by the professionals in the civilian world, there is no reason why they shouldn’t be handled by professionals in the military as well. The STOP Act would create a legal entity that specializes in the investigation and prosecution of these predators. The STOP Act would hold predators responsible and accountable for their criminal activity. Sexual assault and rape is not only a felony crime but it is a human rights issue. The STOP Act will protect our defenders too.

Army Staff Sgt Paul Norris Shot Spc Kamisha Block Five Times in Iraq, Then Killed Self (2007)

Kamisha Block

Spc. Kamisha Block, US Army

Spc. Kamisha Block, 20, US Army, died of a non combat related incident in Baghdad, Iraq on August 16, 2007. Spc. Block was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom on behalf of the 401st Military Police Company, 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade in Fort Hood, Texas. The Department of Defense announced at the time of the press release that the circumstances surrounding the incident were under investigation. Media reports indicate that Kamisha died of gunshot wounds after she was shot in the shoulder, chest, and head area five times by a fellow Army soldier, Staff Sg. Paul Norris. Norris then turned the gun on himself putting a single bullet into the right side of his head. Medics found Norris dead at the scene and Kamisha with a sucking chest wound. Kamisha Block was pronounced dead a few minutes later at Camp Liberty Troop Medical Clinic. The family claims there was no serious relationship with Norris yet he became possessive and began abusing her. They believe she was not protected by the Army.

“She spent a year in Korea, and then returned for a few months to Fort Hood before she left for Iraq in 2007. While in Texas she began a relationship with Staff Sgt. Brandon Norris, her parents said, a man in the same battalion. Although the Blocks never believed Norris and Kamisha Block had a serious relationship, Norris became attached and possessive of her, Army investigators told the family. Before they left Fort Hood for Iraq, Norris physically assaulted Kamisha Block, her family learned through later Army reports. He was disciplined and received counseling, but he did not lose his jealous nature.” ~Home of the Brave

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Army Casualties
Army Spc. Kamisha J. Block
Army Specialist Kamisha Block – Daughter of Texas
Parents of soldier Army says was murdered want to know why abuse wasn’t taken more seriously
Parents Are Upset With Army’s Investigation Into Soldier’s Death
Is There an Army Cover Up of Rape and Murder of Women Soldiers?
US Military Keeping Secrets About Female Soldiers’ “Suicides”?
What’s The Military Hiding About LaVena Johnson & Kamisha Block’s Deaths?
Exposed: Military Lied About Murder of U.S. Soldier in Iraq
Why Did the Army Lie about the death of Vidor’s Kamisha Block? She was murdered
Love and Death in Iraq
Men’s magazine details the war murder of Vidor’s Kamisha Block

Pfc Suzanne Swift, US Army, Went AWOL from Fort Lewis in 2006, She Refused to Deploy for a Third Time with Superiors She Accused of Sexual Harassment

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Spc. Suzanne Swift, US Army

“I can’t do this, Mom, I can’t go back there.” -Suzanne Swift

Pfc. Suzanne Swift, US Army, was a Military Police Officer stationed at Fort Lewis in Washington. She had already deployed twice to Iraq before getting tasked to go again for the third time in less then four years. In January 2006, Suzanne Swift decided last minute to go Absent without Leave (AWOL) instead of going back to Iraq. According to her mother, Sara Rich, she couldn’t handle another deployment dealing with the daily hour-to-hour sexual harassment that she endured from the majority of her male officers and fellow soldiers. She felt especially isolated in Iraq and feared being attacked, harassed, molested, and raped. She told her mom that most of the other soldiers were sexually harassing her, pressuring her to consent, and making her life miserable for rejecting them. Her mom asked her if she wanted to report the sexual harassment and Suzanne did not. She told her mom that reporting would only make her life even more of a living hell. She says when she did blow the whistle on one of her superiors for sexually harassing her, she was treated like a pariah. Suzanne shared that he was moved to a different unit and promoted. She felt that those who reported were not supported but instead shamed when they brought these matters to the attention of their superiors.

According to Suzanne, Army leadership pressured her into signing a release form waiving her right to the mandatory decompression time of eighteen months between deployments. Suzanne refused to sign the form waiving her rights to decompression time but was told that her life would be ‘hell in a shit hole’ if she refused to sign. She says they screamed in her face and intimidated her. As a result she signed the form and was scheduled to leave for Iraq again in January 2006. The Eugene Police raided her home in March 2006, she was arrested, and she was taken back to Fort Lewis where she would be confined. She was charged with missing movement and AWOL. In December 2006, Suzanne pleaded guilty to both charges and was demoted and sentenced to thirty days in prison. If she met the conditions of the plea agreement, she could remain in the Army and be eligible for a honorable discharge. After she finished her sentence she would be reassigned to a new unit. If she did not agree to the plea, she was facing a year in prison and a dishonorable discharge. Her plea, which came during a summary court martial, helped her avoid a federal conviction. Suzanne chose to leave the Army as soon as she could. She would later be diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Suzanne and her mother believe that the intimidation and sexual harassment that female soldiers endure is leading to massive stress and in some cases even death for military women in Iraq. So much stress that Suzanne would choose AWOL and prison time over deploying a third time to fight what she felt was a pointless war in Iraq. Sara Rich is confident that Suzanne saved her own life with her courage. And based on what has happened in the Army in Iraq and at Joint Base Lewis-McChord since 2006, we think she’s right.

Read More:
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
Violent Crime at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington

“Notice to those who report false claims of rape, harassment, assault, and command rape: you make it difficult for those who experience the real thing. You are just as culpable as those who commit the acts.” –Suzanne Swift Petition

Related Links:
Sara Rich | A Moment of Silence Is Not Enough
Sara Rich | Fear for My Daughter
Protest in support of Suzanne Swift at Ft. Lewis gates on Sat., Jul. 15
Rallying for Suzanne Swift
An Update on U.S. Army Specialist Suzanne Swift
CNN: This Week at War
Army Spc Suzanne Swift, Iraq vet and sexual assault victim, supporters rally at Ft Lewis
Iraq Vets’ Sit-in for Suzanne Swift is Successful
The ordeal of Suzanne Swift
Petition for Suzanne Swift
Support Suzanne Swift!
Command Rape
Female Soldiers Treated ‘Lower Than Dirt’
Abuse of women GIs: Good men must check bad ones
Iraq Veteran Says Harassment Prompted Desertion
From Victim To Accused Army Deserter
U.S. soldier goes AWOL — alleges sexual harassment / Enemy lines: She deserted the Army just before her 2nd tour in Iraq, not because of the war, she says, but because her superiors preyed on her
Fort Lewis soldier will face trial
G.I. war resister Suzanne Swift to be court-martialed
NWI Statement of Support for Suzanne Swift
America’s secret war
Spc. Suzanne Swift Signs Statement with Military After Harassment Claim, AWOL Status Lead to Court-Martial
Female soldier sentenced to 30 days for going AWOL
Soldier who claimed sex harassment, refused to return to Iraq freed from military custody
For Female Soldiers, Sexual Assault Remains a Danger
The Women’s War
Featured War Resister: Suzanne Swift
Soldier from Eugene Freed from Confinement
Spc. Suzanne Swift Released from Military Prison, Supporters Rally at Ft. Lewis
Fort Lewis private out of custody
Sexual Assault in the Military: A DoD Cover-Up?
Catching up with military resister Suzanne Swift
Oregon veteran among troops suffering sexual trauma
US Female Soldiers Raped by Male Comrades Have Trouble Seeking Justice
The Plight of Women Soldiers
Rape within Military: 1 in 3 women service members sexually assaulted at least once
A voice for women military vets
Iraq Veterans Against the War Profile of Resisters
Paying It Forward Thanks to Army Specialist Suzanne Swift
Law Office of Keith J. Scherer, PC (Military Trial Lawyer)

The US Air Force Academy Sexual Assault Scandal, Colorado (2003)

USAF Seal

On January 2, 2003, Jessica Brakey, a female cadet at the US Air Force Academy, contacted media and congressional representatives asking for help with sexual assault at the Academy. As a result of her coming forward, Senator Wayne Allard’s office had been contacted by 38 former cadets, 23 current cadets, and one civilian, all of whom said they had been raped by Air Force Academy men. During the investigation into the scandal, the air force admitted that 16 graduates who were accused of sexual assaults are currently serving as officers in the military. Like every scandal before and since, the USAFA leaders at the time took the fall for the ‘scandal’ and the USAF promised it had made sweeping changes in regards to how they will handle allegations of sexual abuse. They also claimed the problem was isolated at the Academy in Colorado.

“It’s a terrible feeling when someone does this to you and gets away with it, and then you report it and the system punishes you. It’s almost worse than the actual act, that the system failed you.” ~Sharon Fullilove

2003 United States Air Force Academy sexual assault scandal
Air Force Academy Investigated 54 Sexual Assaults in 10 Years
Air Force Admits at Least 54 Cases of Rape and Sexual Assault at Air Force Academy–Scandal Called Bigger Than Tailhook: We’ll Talk to Two Survivors
The Air Force Academy Scandal
Survey: 20 percent of female cadets victims of sexual assault
Report finds sexual assault, drug use at Air Force Academy
Air Force Academy Sees New Assault, Drug Use Allegations
Air Force Rape Scandal Grows
Air Force Academy Ignores Rapes, Women Say
US Air Force Academy chiefs removed over rape scandal
Air Force leadership blamed for sex scandal
Pentagon blames Air Force Academy leaders for sexual misconduct scandal
Air Force: Sex assault scandal confined to the academy
Breaking Ranks
Code of Dishonor
Air Force Academy Whistleblower Alleges Dog Poisoned in Retaliation
No Simple Explanation In Air Force Academy Sex Crime Data
Honor and Deception: A secretive Air Force program recruits academy students to inform on fellow cadets and disavows them afterward
U.S. Air Force Academy — It Doesn’t Get Better

US Navy Tailhook Scandal (1991)

US Navy

The Tailhook scandal was a series of incidents where more than 100 U.S. Navy and United States Marine Corps aviation officers were alleged to have sexually assaulted 83 women and 7 men, or otherwise engaged in “improper and indecent” conduct at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, Nevada.[1] The events took place at the 35th Annual Tailhook Association Symposium from September 8 to 12, 1991. –Wikipedia

1992
Tailhook: Scandal Time
Navy Secretary orders disciplinary action in Tailhook scandal
70 to Run the Navy’s Gauntlet for Involvement in Tailhook Scandal
Sexual-Harassment Scandal Rocks US Navy Into Reform
Tailhook finally permeates presidential consciousness
Two Navy Admirals Removed in Tailhook Scandal
Navy Secretary Orders Anti-Sexual Abuse Training — Action Follows Tailhook Scandal, New Incident At California Base
Witch Hunt In the Navy
Running a Gauntlet of Sexual Abuse: Sexual Harassment of Female Naval Personnel in the United States Navy (Californian Western Law)
Sexual scandal has US Navy chiefs all at sea: Revelations of misconduct have forced the entire military to examine how women are treated, says David Usborne in Washington

1993
The Gauntlet
Up To 150 In Tailhook Scandal Face Penalties An Investigator Is Expected To Present His Findings Friday. An Official Said It “Won’t Be A Pretty Picture.”
What Really Happened at Tailhook Convention : Scandal: The Pentagon report graphically describes how fraternity-style hi-jinks turned into hall of horrors.
Navy Vice Admiral Addresses Issue Of Tailhook Scandal
Navy Secretary Seeks Top Admiral’s Resignation in the Tailhook Scandal
Another flier cleared of assault in Navy’s Tailhook sex scandal
Three Navy admirals punished in Tailhook scandal

1994
Light Punishment For Admiral’s Son
Tailhook Plaintiff Wins Suit

1995
She Stood Alone: The Tailhook Scandal
Review: ‘She Stood Alone: The Tailhook Scandal’

1996
Tailhook Storm Still Is Raging: Denied Promotion, A Pilot Sued The Navy
Admiral, in Suicide Note, Apologized to ‘My Sailors’
Letter revealed Boorda wanted to avoid shame
The Murder of Admiral Jeremy Boorda
Navy Petty Officer Elise Makdessi Double Crossed & Murdered by Husband Eddie who Came Up with a Better Plan Yielding him $700,000 in Life Insurance
Navy Petty Officer Quincy Brown Murdered by Military Spouse Motivated to Kill by Wife’s $700,000 Life Insurance Policy
`Frontline’ Leaves Tailhook Questions Unanswered
Hilton lawyer argues for overturn of Tailhook award

1998
Navy boots male, female sailors for group sexual incident

2000
Navy Probes Alleged ‘Tailhook 2’ Groping

2001
Tailhook: The Dream and the Reality

2002
New York Times Insults Memory of Retired Naval Officer Killed in September 11th Terrorist Attack
New Information Undermines Lawsuit Intended to Silence CMR

2003
Retired admiral’s reputation healed after ’93 scandal
A Tale of Two Paula’s

2008
McCain Picks Tailhook Sexual Harassment Scandal Vet To Oversee Transition

2009
Lt. Comm. Alberta Jones, US Navy
Lt. Comm. Alberta Jones discusses the coverup of her sexual harassment case

2010
Navy Man Claims Aviator Call Signs Get Too Personal
Retired Navy Officer Robert Klosterman Shot his Wife Rebecca Because She ‘Ruined’ his Military Career, Then He Shot Himself

2011
Navy is reliving the ‘Tailhook’ scandal
Navy women see slow-but-steady rise in ranks
Lewd Videos Cost Navy Capt. His Command
Navy officer at center of racy-videos case to be relieved of command
Salty Dogs No More: Navy Cans Officers for Personal Failings
Where are the now? (Paula Coughlin)

2012
Military’s tough stance on sex abuse hailed
‘Tailhook’ cleaned up, but top Marine sees more work to stop sex assaults
Sexual Assaults Plague Military After Decades of Reform
Jacksonville resident in historic ‘Tailhook’ military scandal keeps pressure on sex assault issue
Lackland fallout: Rape victim turned whistleblower calls for congressional hearings
Tailhook Whistleblower Demands Congress Investigate Lackland Sexual Assaults
Tailhook whistle-blower calls for Lackland sex scandal hearing
Tailhook whistle-blower wants congressional hearing on Lackland

2013
The Feminist Assault on the Military
Revisiting the Military’s Tailhook Scandal
Retro Report: The Legacy of Tailhook
Legacy of the Tailhook Scandal | The New York Times
Senior US navy officers under investigation as bribery scandal widens
Navy scandal spans globe, climbs ranks
Adm. Frank Kelso, 79, tied to Tailhook scandal
Frank Kelso, 79, former top admiral who was mired in Tailhook scandal
Revisiting the Tailhook Sexual Assault Scandal

2014
Accused Navy pilot Gregory McWherter resigns as Tailhook Association president
Blue Angels’ former commander under investigation quits Tailhook post
Navy Times: Blue Angels report calls out fighter pilot culture
Tailhook victim criticizes ‘ludicrous’ sentence in Tuesday’s Nellis court-martial

2015
Sexism Snarks Assembly of Female Navy Aviators
The man who seduced the 7th fleet: Fat Leonard’s trail of corruption
Tailhook Scandal

2016
Guest column: Tailhook started huge changes
She’s Got Grit: A Conversation with Pioneer Navigator Linda Maloney
The 10 Most Shocking Military Scandals

Books:
Inside the Tailhook Scandal: A Naval Aviator’s Story
The Mother of All Hooks: The Story of the U. S. Navy’s Tailhook Scandal
Fall From Glory: The Men Who Sank the U.S. Navy
Tailhook ’91 and the US Navy (Duke University)

Victims:
Victim 7: Lieutenant (0-3) United States Navy/Female
Victim 9: Civilian/Female
Victim 11: Civilian/Female
Victim 19: Lieutenant (0-3)United States Navy Reserve/Female
Victim 37: Civilian/Female
Victim 38: Civilian/Female
Victim 50: Lieutenant (0-3) United States Navy/Female (Paula Coughlin)
Tailhook Male Victims


Military sexual assault is not a new phenomenon. A second look at the Tailhook scandal in 1991 reveals what happened then. And what it all means now. -NY Times