A 2011 Documentary Gives You an Inside Look at Toxic Leadership in the US Army: On the Dark Side in Al Doura, Iraq


U.S. Army Ranger John Needham, who was awarded two purple hearts and three medals for heroism, wrote to military authorities in 2007 reporting war crimes that he witnessed being committed by his own command and fellow soldiers in Al Doura, Iraq. His charges were supported by atrocity photos which, in the public interest, are now released in this video. John paid a terrible price for his opposition to these acts. His story is tragic. –On the Dark Side in Al Doura

After watching the 2011 documentary ‘On the Dark Side in Al Doura’ which profiles the case of Army Private John Needham, one can clearly observe the similarities to ‘The Kill Team’ PBS documentary released in 2014. On the Dark Side in Al Doura interviewed Michael Needham, the father of John Needham, who was an Army whistleblower from Fort Carson, Colorado and reported witnessing war crimes and atrocities in Iraq; The Kill Team profiled Adam Winfield, an Army whistleblower from Fort Lewis, Washington who witnessed and tried to report the same war crimes and atrocities in Afghanistan. For the sake of preservation, both John Needham and Adam Winfield admitted feeling pressured to conform or risk their own lives if they didn’t. They both felt like they were being set up to die or participate in the war crimes. Both soldiers at times felt like suicide was their only way out because there was no safe place for them to report overseas nor could they escape the situation. If they made it out of the war zone alive, the return home didn’t fair well for them. The PBS documentary  ‘The Wounded Platoon’ released in 2010 reveals the impacts the wars overseas had on Fort Carson soldiers. After watching these three documentaries, it’s clear why our soldier’s combat experiences traumatized and changed some of them. They not only had to fight a credible threat on the battlefields but some were betrayed by the very team they depended on for their lives.

Michael Needham takes us through the series of events that occurred in the course of John’s short Army career. He shared how John was the fifth generation in the family to fight in a war. John volunteered to join the Army in the spring of 2006, went to Fort Benning, Georgia for training, and then got stationed at Fort Carson. John was an Army Ranger assigned to the 212th, 2nd Combat Team, 12th Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. He was part of the infamous team known as the ‘Lethal Warriors’ which now appears to be disbanded. Part of his initiation into his new band of brothers was fighting other soldiers to determine where one fell in the pecking order. John held his own in the fights and was respected for his wins. According to John, the soldiers that didn’t fair so well in the fights were ‘smoked’ by leadership and peers, which ultimately forced them to leave, quit, or commit suicide. In October of 2006 John was deployed with his Fort Carson team to Al Doura, Iraq. His team was assigned to the Quarter Cav which was known for having some of the deadliest fights in the Iraq war.

John was a good soldier. He worked hard, saved lives in Iraq, and was awarded three medals for heroism and two Purple Hearts. John excelled as part of team, was brave, and his resilience was admirable. But during the course of John’s deployment, he witnessed war crimes and other atrocities committed by leadership and his fellow soldiers that affected his morale. John would also admit that initially he wasn’t quiet about it and when he did question superiors, he was told he didn’t have the right to question leadership. He didn’t dare report the war crimes via e-mail or telephone because he knew leadership could monitor everything. So for the sake of preservation and life’s sake, he did what he had to do to get by and stay alive. John would share that the Army was short of personnel so most of the soldiers got driven into the ground and deprived of sleep. After awhile John felt that he was forced into committing war atrocities that were illegal but feared if he didn’t do it, he would become a liability to the team and ultimately a casualty of his own people.

One night John was sent out on a mission with a Lieutenant (who did not commit war crimes yet remained silent). John thought this was unusual because they didn’t usually get sent out in pairs. They were ambushed by three shooters in the middle of the night who were determined to see them dead. When the shooting began, John pushed the Lieutenant to safety and kept the shooters at bay. He shot every round he had and when he was almost out of ammunition, he called the 212th for back-up on the radio but nobody answered him. Luckily another team was nearby who did answer him and was able to extract the soldiers from the situation and save their lives. It would be this incident that would break John’s spirit. He immediately suspected that he and the other soldier were sent on this mission to be killed. When he got back to the base, he began yelling “Why did you set us up?” And “If you want to kill me, kill me to my face!” But nobody acknowledged him so he went back to his tent where he decided that he would commit suicide. John was exhausted, irate, and he saw no way out. He didn’t want to live anymore. He felt that committing suicide was his only way out. John put a handgun to his head but just as he got ready to pull the trigger, his roommate dove and pushed the gun away from his head. The gun discharged and put a hole in the wall. Soldiers immediately began ascending upon the area. According to John, once leadership learned what happened, they held him down and beat him then locked him in captivity in a small room. The Battalion Commander was the one who kept John captive yet he didn’t press any formal charges.

John’s father Michael learned through John’s friends in Afghanistan that John was being held captive by the Battalion Commander. They were concerned about him. John’s family was already concerned about John’s earlier e-mails and posts on MySpace because it sounded like he had given up, which was not like him. With this information Michael Needham contacted Army commands, Fort Carson, Congressional leaders and the Army Inspector General (IG). He reports that the only office that took him seriously at the time was the IG. Michael was trying to save his son’s life. He told the IG that he didn’t want him to die. The IG’s office shared a list of rights for both John and Michael. And it was at this time Michael learned that he had third party rights and could intervene and act on John’s behalf. Michael was finally able to get in touch with the Battalion Commander only to learn that John was being treated like a criminal. The Battalion Commander informed Michael that John committed crimes and was being sent to prison in Kuwait. But Michael was able to intervene and get the Command to send him to medical instead. Medical determined that John was severely injured both physically and mentally. He had significant back injuries from the multiple explosions and blasts, shrapnel in his body, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Army medical in Iraq referred John to medical in Germany and from there he would be sent to Walter Reed Army Medical Center in the states. But not before the Battalion Commander would put up one more roadblock. Instead, Michael Needham won this battle and John was flown to Germany.

Eventually, John was sent to Ward 54 which is the psychiatric ward at Walter Reed. Michael shared that John appeared to like the psychiatric help he was getting. A month into John’s stay at Walter Reed, he was informed that the Iraq Battalion Commander contacted the 212th Command in Colorado and requested that John be sent back to Fort Carson where he was facing criminal charges including unlawful discharge of a weapon. They were making him go and sent armed guards to accompany him back to Fort Carson. Michael Needham tried to intervene with the 212th at Fort Carson but they said they couldn’t do anything because they had orders from the Battalion Commander. John was sent back to Fort Carson and the harassment he endured in Iraq continued with the 212th in Colorado. John shared that they mentally tortured him, banged on his barracks door, stole his things, and isolated him. It was at this time Michael elicited the help of a veteran advocate Andrew Pogany who went to the command in Colorado and held these people personally accountable. Andrew helps soldiers in John’s situation because he understands how important it is to intervene. John could not get the kind of help that he needed at Fort Carson. Michael shared that the soldiers could see a professional once a week if they were suicidal and once a month if they were not. John’s father wanted him transferred to a Naval Medical Center in San Diego for intensive treatment and so he could be closer to home. Andrew helped make that happen.

Michael began to understand the impacts the war had on his son after John got back to California. John couldn’t handle driving above 35 mph, was suspicious of trash on the side of the road, and was easily startled by loud noises. He could not function in public and suffered with what is known as flashbacks. The Naval Medical Center in San Diego recommended that John get surgery on his back right away. They warned him that he could become paralyzed if he didn’t get the surgery. In the meantime Johns father spoke candidly with one of the Navy doctors about the treatment John received both in Iraq and at Fort Carson. He reiterated that he was concerned about his well being and asked him to help him find a way to prevent John from being sent back to Fort Carson, Colorado. Michael Needham feared that if John got sent back to Fort Carson that he would not return. This doctor agreed to help John. And Andrew Pogany recommended that John report the war crimes to the Army in an effort to protect John from being complicit and implicated in the future. John reported to the Army that he witnessed both leadership and peers killing innocent Iraqi civilians during the October 2006 to October 2007 timeframe in and around Al Doura. It wasn’t long after John made the report that all the charges against him were dropped and Fort Carson gave the necessary approval to transfer him to Balboa Naval Command. John went in front of the medical board and was medically retired for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Traumatic Brain Injury, and back injuries. He was discharged honorably from the Army. The Army investigated John’s claims but concluded that no war crimes were committed.

Michael and John won a lot of battles with the US Army but soon they would lose the war. Just days after John was discharged from the Army, he would be accused of beating his new girlfriend to death with his bare hands. John Needham was charged with the murder of Jacqwelyn Villagomez and jailed for ten months until his family raised enough money to get him out on bail. John was not given treatment while jailed so the family was motivated to get him out so he could get the treatment he needed. John did in fact follow through with getting treatment and he learned a lot about himself in the process. He spent some time on camera talking about how the combat stress and the betrayal from his team impacted him. He talked about how he didn’t realize the significant impacts from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury. John recognized how PTSD and TBI did in fact play a role in his fight or flight response mechanisms and that it may be because these conditions went untreated that he disocciated, snapped and beat his girlfriend to death. The two were in a heated argument after Jacqwelyn attacked one of John’s female friends. Both of them were volatile but unfortunately there were no witnesses to the event as John’s friend was outside the home calling the police to report Jacqwelyn. While John was awaiting trial, he went to Arizona to get another surgery and visit with his mom. On February 19, 2010 following treatment at the Department of Veterans Affairs, John would be found dead in his room from an overdose on painkillers. The cause of death at autopsy was considered undetermined and it is unclear if John accidentally overdosed or committed suicide.

Brig. Gen. Stephen Xenakis, M.D. (Ret.), a former top military psychiatrist who until recently was a consultant to the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told us: “[TBI ]most sensitively affects executive functioning, that part of the brain that we use for judgment and we use for decision making … when we are in situations of intense emotion. So if a person is affected neurologically … they don’t have the controls that they had before. … They can’t think as clearly. …They are really vulnerable to just reacting, overreacting, particularly maybe doing something that they had done when they’d been in combat.” –The Wounded Platoon

As a parent, Michael Needham has questions for the Army. Why don’t they even recognize the problem? Why don’t they take care of the soldiers? And why did they leave his son John Needham behind? The documentary ‘On the Dark Side in Al Doura’ concludes with the reminder that since the Patriot Act was passed and Dick Cheney declared that we needed to go into the shadows, the definition of torture has been blurred. The Abu Ghraib prisoner torture and abuse scandal erupted under the Bush administration in 2003 but no war crimes have been investigated under President Barack Obama’s administration. If the rule of law has been lost, what do we have? Our military personnel have a responsibility to abide by the rules established by the Geneva Conventions. John Needham and Adam Winfield both reported witnessing innocent civilians murdered by their fellow leadership and peers in Iraq and Afghanistan. They both also shared the impact the crimes had on their mental health and morale. They wished they could have reported the crimes to someone who would have listened and understood that their lives were in danger. We can learn a lot from John Needham and Adam Winfield; they have experienced what it’s like to be a whistleblower in the US Army. They have clearly illustrated what toxic leadership in the Army looks like and how whistleblowers in the US military have nowhere to turn.

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Private John Needham, US Army

Related Links:
Dateline NBC Mystery: Private Needhams War
PBS Documentary: The Wounded Platoon
On the Dark Side in Al Doura: A Soldier in the Shadows
PBS Documentary: The Kill Team
The PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Nominated for an Emmy
Retired Army Pvt John Needham Beat his Girlfriend Jacqwelyn Villagomez to Death, Then Died of an Overdose on Painkillers Awaiting Murder Trial (2008)
Honoring Jacqwelyn Villagomez who Died at the Hands of Retired Army Private John Needham (2008)

Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington (US Army)

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Photo Credit: McChord Air Museum

*Research not complete & includes combat deaths

Joint Base Lewis-McChord (JBLM) is a U.S. military installation home to I Corps and 62d Airlift Wing located 9.1 miles south-southwest of Tacoma, Washington under the jurisdiction of the United States Army Joint Base Headquarters. The facility is an amalgamation of the United States Army’s Fort Lewis and the United States Air Force’s McChord Air Force Base which merged on 1 February 2010 into a Joint Base as a result of Base Realignment and Closure Commission recommendations of 2005. -Wikipedia

2017:

Michael Mantenuto, US Army Veteran: Found dead at Saltwater State Park, WA

2016:

Louis Moua, US Army: Died in training accident
Timothy Hovey, US Army: Homicide victim, unsolved, cold case, reward
Matthew Thompson, US Army: Improvised Explosive Device, Afghanistan

2015:

James Ahn, US Army (2015): Parachute Error
A parachute defect went undetected for years and led to a soldier’s death
Army: Parachute manufacturing error caused 2015 JBLM death

Christina Booth, US Army Spouse (2015)
Court papers: Wife of JBLM soldier stabbed kids to keep them quiet
JBLM Soldier’s wife charged with attempted murder, knife attack on her 3 babies
Mom’s Accused Attempted Murder and Mental Health for Spouses

Celia FlorCruz, US Army (2015): Sexual Assault Victim
JBLM Officer Breaks Silence About Sexual Assaults She’s Endured

Skylar Nemetz, US Army (2014): Homicide-Wife

Andrew Sass, US Army (2014): Training Accident
NC soldier killed in training exercise in California

Shawn Woods, US Army (2014): Homicide Victim

Jeremiah Hill, US Army (2013): Homicide-Soldier

Refugio Sanchez Jr, US Army (2013): Homicide-Girlfriend
Former JBLM soldier gets 18 years for beating girlfriend to death
Cops: Mom beaten to death with vacuum cleaner

Robert Bales, US Army (2012): Homicide-Afghan Civilians

Benjamin Colton Barnes, US Army Vet (2012): Homicide/Suicide-Civilian

Robert Chiaravallotti, US Army (2012): Homicide-Wife; Rape-Step Daughter

Abel Gutierrez, US Army (2012)
Mom of former JBLM soldier in murder-suicide found dead

Nathaniel Ollis, US Army (2012): Homicide Victim
Maine soldier found stabbed to death in Olympia, Wash.
Slain Maine soldier just weeks from discharge
Washington Police Give Details About Maine Soldier’s Murder Case
Army private found stabbed in Washington was stationed at troubled base, Fort Lewis

Shannon Remus, US Army (2012): Homicide-Civilian
JBLM soldier gets probation in Wis. homicide case
JBLM police officer arrested, suspected of helping husband hide body in Wisconsin slaying

Michael Ristau, US Army (2012): Improvised Explosive Device, Afghanistan
Lewis-McChord soldier killed in Afghanistan

Robert Underwood, US Army (2012)
Joint Base Lewis-McChord Officer Charged with Making Death Threats

Frank Buoniconti III, US Army (2011): Helicopter Crash
Army investigation pinpoints helicopter accident flaws

Anne Montgomery, US Army (2011): Helicopter Crash
Army investigation pinpoints helicopter accident flaws

Dae Han Park, US Army (2011): Improvised Explosive Device, Afghanistan
IED Kills Local Soldier

Duane Rader, US Army (2011): Domestic Violence
Army Wife Testifies Husband Set Her Legs On Fire
Army wife says husband intentionally lit her legs on fire
Thurston County man to serve time for setting wife on fire
Army sergeant gets 10 years for setting wife’s legs afire

Joseph Satterfield, US Army (2011): Helicopter Crash
Army investigation pinpoints helicopter accident flaws

Luis Sigfrid, US Army (2011): Helicopter Crash
Army investigation pinpoints helicopter accident flaws

David Stewart, US Army (2011)
Man in murder-suicide car identified as soldier at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, 10-year-old girl found safe in Oregon

Dakota Wolf, US Army (2011): Homicide-Civilian
Soldier based in Washington state suspected in teen’s fatal stabbing
AWOL soldier charged with teen’s murder
Soldier charged with murder in Kirkland woman’s slaying; friend says suspect, victim knew each other
Wolf pleads guilty to Kirkland woman’s death, victim’s father not satisfied
AWOL soldier gets 20 years for slaying of Kirkland woman

Adriana Alvarez, US Army (2010): Non combat related incident, Iraq

Calvin Gibbs, US Army (2010): Homicide-Afghan Civilian

Carlos Gill, US Army (2010): Non combat related illness, Afghanistan

Andrew Holmes, US Army (2010): Homicide-Afghan Civilian

Jeremy Morlock, US Army (2010): Homicide-Afghan Civilian

Christopher Opat, US Army (2010): Non combat related incident, Iraq

Sheldon Plummer, US Army (2010): Homicide-Wife
*Strangled his wife, Lacey Plummer (Iraq War Army veteran)
Lacey-area soldier gets 14.5 years in wife’s death; family speaks
Homicide details revealed
Sgt. Sheldon Plummer Pleads Guilty to Homefront Murder of Ex-Soldier Wife

Joshua Tabor, US Army (2010): Child Abuse

Michael Wagnon, US Army (2010): Homicide Charges Dropped

Adam Winfield, US Army (2010): Homicide-Afghan Civilian

Eric Autio, US Army (2009): Accidental Shooting Victim
Fort Lewis Army Wife Kills Husband During Gun Lesson
Fort Lewis soldier fatally shot teaching his wife how to use gun
Soldier accidentally shot dead by wife as he gave her gun lesson

Timothy Bennitt, US Army (2009): Homicide-Civilian
Fort Lewis soldier charged in teen’s death
Soldier charged in girl’s Army base death
Army Says Soldier Gave Teen Lethal Cocktail of Drugs on Base
Soldier guilty in death of teen girl in Fort Lewis barracks
Soldier’s sentence in drug-related death gets another look

John Russell, US Army (2009): Homicide-Soldiers in Iraq

Nathan Smith, US Army (2009): Kidnapping, Rape, and Arson

Amy Tirador, US Army (2009): Death Ruled Suicide, Iraq

Ivette Davila, US Army (2008): Homicide-Husband&Civilian
Soldier admits double murder at Fort Lewis, won’t face death
‘I understood I was killing them’: Fort Lewis soldier admits to murder
Lewis-McChord soldier sentenced to life without parole for double murder, kidnapping baby
Bakersfield soldier could face death penalty in murder case

Timothy Ayers, US Army (2007): Homicide-Soldier
Soldier Accused of Murdering Sergeant
Soldier charged in shooting death of Loganton veteran
Parents of fallen Iraq War soldier angry over court decision
`A hideous accident’

Michael Barbera, US Army (2007): Homicide Charges Dropped

Anthony Cruse, US Army (2007): Homicide-Soldier
Soldier accused of stabbing death
Fort Lewis soldier charged with murder
Licking Man Charged in Murder
Licking Teenager Charged in Army Stabbing
US, Appellee v. Private E1 ANTHONY J. CRUSE, US Army, Appellant (2010)

Hannah Gunterman, US Army (2006): Non combat death, Iraq, Homicide

Suzanne Swift, US Army (2006): Victim of Sex Crimes

Brandon Bare, US Army (2005): Homicide-Wife
Soldier charged in wife’s death
Ft. Lewis stabbing details revealed
Army jury convicts soldier in wife’s death
Soldier, 20, convicted of wife’s murder

Jamaal Lewis, US Army (2005): Homicide-Soldier&Civilian
Fort Lewis soldier sentenced to life for slaying fellow soldier and woman
Crystal McDowell & a Fort Lewis soldier were shot and killed outside a popular bar by another soldier
US, Appellee v. Jamaal A. LEWIS, Specialist, U.S. Army, Appellant (2011)
Jamaal Lewis & Daqon Sipple: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know

Christopher Baber, US Army (2003): Manslaughter

Jeremy Meyers, US Army (2003): Homicide-Wife

Joshua Koerner, US Army (2000): Homicide Victim
Soldier with Polk Ties Killed

Christian Davis, US Army (1987): Homicide-Wife
Soldier Convicted of Killing Wife

Alexander Cronkhite, US Army (1918): Homicide Victim
Monument marks JBLM mystery death nearly 100 years later
Major Alexander P. Cronkhite is shot and killed during training exercise at Fort Lewis on October 25, 1918

Related Links:
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
‘Kill Team’ Murdered Civilians In Afghanistan
Capital punishment rare for killers in U.S. military
Military Base Jarred by Specter of Gang Killings
Home Base of Accused Soldier Has Faced Scrutiny
Afghan Killings: Troubled History of American Base
Afghanistan shootings are latest trouble linked to Lewis-McChord
Army Base on the Brink
The Kill Team: How U.S. Soldiers in Afghanistan Murdered Innocent Civilians
How to Spot a Whitewash in Army’s Death Squad Inquiry
What’s happening at Joint Base Lewis-McChord?
Lewis-McChord ‘most troubled base in military,’ report says
Army beefs up leadership at troubled Lewis-McChord base
The PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Nominated for an Emmy

Joint Base Lewis-McChord had 16 soldiers commit suicide last year [2011], the most of any Army post, Army statistics show. Since 2003, 68 soldiers from the base have killed themselves, among the higher totals for the Army in that period, but still below Fort Hood, Fort Campbell and Fort Bragg. –NY Times

The PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Reveals How the Military Justice System Operates in Response to Media Scandals (November 12, 2013)

The Kill Team is a PBS documentary featuring the Joint Base Lewis-McChord soldiers in Washington who were accused of murdering innocent Afghanistan civilians on a deployment in 2010. The media came up with ‘The Kill Team’ designator to describe the actions of five Army soldiers specifically who were involved in this scandal. It turns out it wasn’t the scandal the media made it out to be after all yet all five soldiers featured in the media were sanctioned regardless. There were a total of eleven enlisted soldiers who were punished for their actions in Afghanistan. No Army leadership at the base were held accountable. The real scandals are the lack of oversight in Afghanistan, the lack of accountability for leadership, and the broken military justice system. This film clearly shows how the military justice system operates differently then the civilian justice system. If you want to learn more about how military justice works, watch this film. This film depicted the toxic leadership in the ‘Platoon from Hell’ and the dangers of being a whistleblower in the US Army. The Kill Team was nominated for an Emmy by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The Kill Team is now available for purchase on I-Tunes, Amazon Prime, Netflix, or where ever you purchase or rent films digitally.

Calvin Gibbs: Sentenced to Life; Granted new hearing in 2016
Andrew Holmes: Sentenced to 7 years in prison; Released from prison
Jeremy Morlock: Sentenced to 8 years in prison
Michael Wagnon: Murder charges dropped by Army
Adam Winfield: Sentenced to 3 years; Released from prison

Related Links:
Violent Crime at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington

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Army Soldier Adam Winfield Tried to Report War Crimes in Afghanistan But Instead was Charged with War Crimes as Part of ‘The Kill Team’ (2010)

A Stryker unit that went off the rails in Afghanistan, allegedly murdering civilians, threatening a fellow soldier and using drugs

Spc. Adam Winfield, US Army

Learn more: The PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Nominated for an Emmy

Related Links:
Army Charge Sheets
Sworn Statements
Winfield Charge Sheet
Soldiers charged in Afghan killings
US soldiers charged with murdering civilians in Afghanistan war
Joint Base Lewis-McChord Stryker soldier faces court-martial
Father: Army Ignored Complaints Of Afghan Slayings
Fort Lewis soldier’s father: Army was warned of murder plot
Soldier’s father: Army was warned of murder plot
Facebook Chat of Accused Afghan ‘Kill Team’ Member Made Public
Young Soldier Both Revered and Reviled
Army ‘Kill Team’ Member: ‘We All Said Yes’ to Slaying Afghan Civilian
Third “kill team” defendant asks to get out of jail
Soldier pleads guilty to manslaughter in Afghan’s killing
‘Kill Team’ Soldier Gets Three Years in Prison
Soldier gets 3 years for part he played in deaths of Afghan civilians
Stryker ‘kill team’ trials left some soldiers’ families deeply in debt
The Kill Team: How U.S. Soldiers in Afghanistan Murdered Innocent Civilians
Tribeca Diary: ‘The Kill Team’
‘The Kill Team’: When Your Squad Murders Civilians, What’s a Soldier to Do?
The Kill Team | American War Crimes in Afghanistan
Dan Krauss Investigates the Kill Team
‘The Kill Team’ premieres at Tribeca Film Festival, tells the story of gory murders in Afghanistan
Negative Reviews of ‘The Kill Team’ Miss What Makes the Documentary Special. So Do the Positive Ones
‘Kill Team’: The Documentary the Army Doesn’t Want You to See
“The Kill Team”: When U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan became trophy hunters
The Kill Team is a foggy journey into the heart of darkness
Afghanistan War Movie The Kill Team Is an Absolutely Essential Documentary
Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Captures Nightmare of War
‘The Kill Team’ provides slanted account of Maywand District murders
The Kill Team Movie: Now on PBS

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