Fort Hood Soldier CW02 Andre Nance, US Army, Found Dead at On-Post Hotel at Fort Rucker, Alabama While Attending Training; Under Investigation by CID (2017)

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CW02 Andre Nance, US Army

CW02 Andre Nance, 34, US Army, of Fort Hood was found unresponsive in his on-post hotel room at Fort Rucker, Alabama on February 27, 2017.  CW02 Nance’s home of record is listed as Randallstown, Maryland and he entered the Army in February 2004. CW02 Nance was attending the warrant officer advance course at Fort Rucker and was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, III Corps at Fort Hood. Nance deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from April 2009 to April 2010, January 2012 to March 2012, and June 2014 to March 2015. The circumstances surrounding this incident are under investigation by Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID).

Related Links:
CW2 Andre Nance lg.jpg
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier
Chief Warrant Officer 2 Andre George Nance – III Corps
Deceased Fort Rucker soldier identified
Fort Hood Soldier Found Dead in Alabama Hotel
Fort Hood soldier found unresponsive at Fort Rucker
Army IDs Fort Rucker soldier found dead on post
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead in Alabama hotel identified
UPDATE: Soldier found dead at Fort Rucker hotel identified
Fort Hood soldier found dead on post in Alabama hotel
Army identifies Fort Hood soldier found dead in Alabama
Why Have So Many Fort Hood Army Soldiers Died Stateside in the Last Year?
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members

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Objective: Provide support to families who have lost loved ones to non combat death, homicide, and suicide. Prevent non combat death, homicide and suicide by providing an expedited transfer option to whistleblowers and those who feel like their lives may be in danger.

This is a small sample of the many soldiers that have died of non combat deaths, homicide, and suicide. It was hard for me to choose which ones to feature. Given the amount of families who have questioned a ruling of suicide while their loved one was serving in the US military, it’s fair to say that some suicide rulings should have a second look to determine if a homicide was ruled out. It’s important to note that if the cause of death is determined to be suicide, then the military never has to investigate again.

Brief overview of need for expedited transfers for whistleblowers in general:

John Needham and Adam Winfield had a lot in common: they both claim to have witnessed war crimes, one in Iraq, the other in Afghanistan. They both wanted to report the war crimes but didn’t feel safe doing so. They both admitted to feeling like they were set up to die or participate in the war crimes. The only difference: John’s parents were able to get him out of Iraq after he started deteriorating mentally. Adam’s parents were not able to get him out of Afghanistan and he was charged with war crimes after he was set up to participate. On the Dark Side of Al Doura and the Kill Team Movie are must sees because they show the similarity in the cases and reveal how an expedited transfer option could have helped them & saved innocent civilian lives. I included a history of crime at the bases they were stationed at to demonstrate that the crime simply follows them overseas.

John Needham, Army (2008):
Retired Army Pvt John Needham Beat Girlfriend Jacqwelyn Villagomez to Death, Then Died of Overdose on Painkillers Awaiting Murder Trial
An Inside Look at Toxic Leadership in the US Army: On the Dark Side in Al Doura, Iraq
On the Dark Side in Al Doura, Iraq on YouTube
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Fort Carson

Adam Winfield, Army (2010):
Army Soldier Adam Winfield Tried to Report War Crimes But Instead was Charged with War Crimes as Part of ‘The Kill Team’
PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Nominated for an Emmy
The Kill Team on Amazon Prime
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at JBLM

Would the expedited transfer option help prevent suicide or homicide in these cases?

Alyssa Peterson, Army (2003)

There were concerns that Alyssa committed suicide because she didn’t want to participate in war crimes like torture. Could her life have been saved if she felt like she had a way out? Did she commit suicide? Was homicide ruled out?

Gloria Davis, Denise Lannaman, & Marshall Gutierrez, Army (2006)

Reports indicate Gloria Davis, Army (2006) committed suicide hours after she provided names and testimony to CID investigators regarding soldiers involved in a bribery scheme in Kuwait. She was a witness to the crimes and a witness for the prosecution. Did she commit suicide? Was homicide ever considered? How could this have been prevented? She was one of 3 people in the same logistics group in Kuwait tied to the bribery scheme investigation that committed suicide. Both Denise Lannaman, Army (2006) and Lt. Col. Marshall Gutierrez, Army (2006) deaths were ruled suicides by the Army as well. Were any of these cases investigated as homicides? Did anyone question why three soldiers from Kuwait tied to one investigation killed themselves?

Suzanne Swift, Army (2006)

Suzanne refused to redeploy for a third time for fear that she would be raped or assaulted this time. She went AWOL instead & was jailed. Could this have been prevented if she had a way out of Fort Lewis? She hadn’t been raped or assaulted yet. She was trying to prevent it given the isolation in Iraq. Does the expedited transfer apply to sexual harassment situations where the offender(s) are escalating? How could we have prevented this? If you look at the history of violent crime at JBLM and in Iraq, you can clearly see why Suzanne Swift was fearful for her life. She chose life and jail over rape and murder.

Genesia Gresham, Navy (2007)

Genesia and Anamarie Camacho were victims of homicide in Bahrain. Genesia was said to have been in a casual relationship with the shooter at one point. Were there red flags prior to the murder? Was the shooters behavior escalating? Does domestic violence, harassment, and stalking qualify for an expedited transfer? Could this have been prevented if Genesia had a way out when she realized she may have been in danger? The killer was never jail but instead institutionalized for mental health issues.

Jennifer Valdivia, Navy (2007)

Jennifer was at the center of command investigation of abuse of prisoners in Bahrain. It was reported that she did not want to participate in war crimes yet was belittled, harassed, and abused by a supervisor if she didn’t do what he asked. If she had a way out, could this suicide have been prevented? Was it a suicide? Was it ever investigated as a homicide?

Kelsey Anderson, USAF (2011)

The Anderson family reported that Kelsey’s health deteriorated after she learned that she could not transfer or get out of the military while stationed at Andersen Air Force Base in Guam. Why did she want a transfer? Why did she want to get out of the military all of a sudden? Did something happen to make Kelsey feel the need to get out of Guam as quickly as possible? Her death was ruled a suicide. Could this have been prevented if she was allowed to transfer? The Air Force took her gun privileges away shortly after she got to Guam because of mental health concerns. They gave it back to her a month before she died.

Danny Chen, Army (2011)

Danny was being hazed and bullied by fellow soldiers in Afghanistan. Could his death have been prevented if he had a way out of this situation? Does the expedited transfer apply to scenarios where an individual is being hazed, harassed, and physically assaulted? Did Danny fear murder? How could this have been prevented so Danny didn’t feel like suicide was the only way out?

Ciara Durkin, Mass Army National Guard (2007)

Ciara found discrepancies in the finance office in Afghanistan & feared that she made enemies. She asked her family to investigate if anything happened to her while she was overseas. Could we have saved Ciara’s life if once she realized that crimes may have been committed, she could leave and then safely report? Ciara was a witness to crime yet had to remain in the setting. Do expedited transfers apply to those who want to report crimes yet cannot do so safely in an isolated location?

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I researched the non combat deaths of female soldiers in Iraq, Afghanistan and other areas. I was alarmed by what I learned. It appears that close to 30% of the deaths of female soldiers in Iraq alone are from homicide, suicide, or unknown causes. I am working on doing the same research for male soldiers but have been overwhelmed with the number of non combat deaths of male soldiers. I am starting with 2010 to 2016. Then will focus energy on 2001 to 2010.

Non Combat Death of Female Soldiers:
Iraq
Afghanistan
Other Areas

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There are many cold cases in the military. The Army has the most cold cases. This list is a small sample of the cold cases in the military. Each case has the same theme. The families feel like they can’t get cooperation from the military to figure out what happened to their loved one. The families are devastated by the loss and traumatized further by the indifference, lack of support, and bureaucracy. If the homicide occurred on a base, they have nowhere to turn but the military because of federal jurisdiction issues. Most civilian cold case investigators ask for other investigators to take a look at cases to give them a fresh set of eyes. New investigators can add additional expertise to help find answers and give families closure. Two must see documentaries highlighting some of the major issues with investigations in the military are The Tillman Story (Pat Tillman) and The Silent Truth (LaVena Johnson).

Cold Cases:
Gorden Hess, Army (1998)
Col Philip Shue (2003)
Lavena Johnson, Army (2005)
Tina Priest, Army (2006)
Kamisha Block, Army (2007)
Benjamin Griego, Army NG (2007)
Seteria Brown, Army (2008)
Stacy Dryden, USMC (2008)
Blanca Luna, USAF (2008)
Keisha Morgan, Army (2008)
Cherie Morton, Navy (2008)
BG Thomas Tinsley, USAF (2008)
Anton Phillips, Army (2009)
Amy Seyboth-Tirador (2009)
Katherine Morris, Army Spouse (2012)
Sean Wells, Army (2013)
Virginia Caballero, Army (2014)

Cases Solved by NCIS Cold Case Squad:
Lt Verle Hartley, Navy (1982)
Andrew Muns, Navy (1968)

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Other Areas of Concern:
David Dickson, US Army (1984) Tracking criminal behavior world wide
Kathleen Lipscomb, USAF spouse (1986) Jurisdiction Issues
Walter Smith, USMC (2006) Use of PTSD defense/stigma
Maria Lauterbach, USMC (2007) Expedited Transfer Policy
Jennifer Cole, Army (2008) Accountability/Investigations
Holley Wimunc, US Army (2008) Domestic Violence/Military Role
Morganne McBeth, Army (2010) Sentencing/Negligent Homicide
Mikayla Bragg, Army (2011) Mental Health/Suicide/Personnel Records
Kelli Bordeaux, Army (2012) Sex offender registry/Army role
Michelle Miller, Army (2013) Accountability of those in positions of power
Shadow McClaine, Army (2016) DV & attempted murder prior to homicide
Cati Blauvelt, US Army spouse (2016) DV/Accountability/Fugitives
Army Reserve Veteran Micah Johnson Murdered Five Dallas Police Officers (2016)
A List of Soldiers Targeted & Murdered for the SGLI
5 Service Members Currently on Military Death Row at Leavenworth
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts

History of Homicide/Suicide on Military Bases:
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at US Military Bases

Recommendations:

  • Expand expedited transfer policy to include whistleblowers (war crimes, hazing, stalking, sex harassment, witnesses to crimes) in an effort to prevent homicide and suicide
  • Creation of cold case squads in the Army & Air Force to investigate homicide & suicide rulings
  • Centralized location for families to call to initiate an investigation of suicide ruling or cold cases, with mental health component
  • Official way to dispute findings of military investigators/medical examiners, ability to request a second independent investigation

The Feres Doctrine prevents soldiers from suing the Armed Forces for injuries incurred in the line of duty but families can sue the government in an effort to hold them accountable. Although lawyers and lengthy court battles are costly and re-traumatizing for the families. They shouldn’t have to sue the the government to get answers. They shouldn’t have to submit a FOIA request to find out how their loved one passed. Therefore it only seems fair that we give families the answers and support they need when they lose a loved one who is serving in the US military.

We need centralized databases so that records of criminal activity can be more readily tracked to prevent a violent criminal from escalating to homicide. The military is considered one team now and their criminal activity impacts service members in all branches and civilians in the US and other countries. Given the transient population and jurisdiction issues, it only makes sense to utilize the existing FBI national database in an effort to connect crimes committed on bases, overseas, deployed locations, and in the civilian jurisdictions here in the US. The overall goal is to prevent multiple victims and homicide.

Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at United States Military Bases

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*Research not complete.

My experiences as a victim of crime in the United States military inspired me to do the work I do today as a military justice policy analyst. Not only did I witness first hand how a predator operates but I witnessed multiple predator types in real time while serving my country. If these people committed these acts of crimes at work in the civilian world, they would have been in jail or I would have been rich after taking my employer to civil court. Well maybe not because the deck is stacked against the accuser but we do in fact have a civilian justice system that allows us to hold others accountable, while it simultaneously protects the due process rights of the accused. This cannot be said of the military justice system. There is no guarantee a military Commander will do anything with a crime report let alone process the felony crime effectively. We do not want a justice system where one man or woman decides whether to do nothing, give a non judicial punishment for a felony crime, or railroad the accused or accuser. We do want a justice system where we can hold our employer accountable without roadblocks from the Pentagon, Congress, and the Feres Doctrine. We cannot effectively tackle the violent crime issue in the military until the victims of crimes, like sexual assault and domestic violence, feel safe enough to report. Crime victims have expressed that they do not want to report crimes to a Commander for fear of retaliation. The Department of Defense admitted that of those of who did report the crime, 62% perceived that they faced retaliation. If service members felt safe enough to report, it could help us prevent homicide, suicide, and non combat death.

If we think about violent crime committed by military personnel compared to violent crime statistics in the United States (reference above graph), at first glance it appears the military has a homicide ‘issue’ among the ranks. Please see the below links for a sample of crime on some of the U.S. military bases. All military bases worldwide will eventually be included in this research. And the research for sexual assault, rape, domestic violence, and physical assault specifically has not been conducted yet either. Because the research is far from being complete, it is too early to make any assumptions so I will put the data in one place and let you come to your own conclusions. But if military crime mirrors civilian crime statistics, one can deduce that if the military has a lot of homicide, there is even more rape. Currently the number one concern in the military is a Commander’s ability to give a non judicial punishment for a felony crime. A Commander can bypass the courts martial process simply by punishing and/or discharging the accused with a preponderance of the evidence. This does nothing to protect our military personnel and the civilians who live near our bases in America and worldwide. Predators do not discriminate. They are just as likely to harm civilians as they are military personnel. They know their rights and they know that jurisdiction issues and lack of communication among law enforcement agencies will help prolong getting caught. We need to be one step ahead.

We can’t get real violent crime numbers for the military bases unless we include those who died of non combat deaths while they were deployed. Veterans Noonie Fortin and Ann Wright inspired me to initially look into the non combat deaths of female soldiers overseas because they observed the unusually high number of female soldiers who died of non combat deaths during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their chief concern was that although the military labels a non combat death as a suicide, there are suspicions that some female soldiers were murdered, like LaVena Johnson, Amy Tirador, and Ciara Durkin. I did the research on every single female soldier who died from non combat deaths overseas and their concerns are valid. My research on non combat deaths in Iraq alone revealed that roughly 30% of female soldiers died as a result of homicide, suicide, and other unknown causes. I am working on collecting the data for male soldiers who died from non combat related injuries in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other areas. I started with 2010 so we can get the most recent cases but I will go back to September 11, 2001 in the next phase of data collection. The first male soldier non combat death case I found in 2010 was an unsolved homicide. His name was SSG Anton Phillips and he was stabbed to death in Afghanistan. Further research in this area has uncovered that non combat deaths of male soldiers are just as prevalent.

Learn more:
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Bragg, North Carolina (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Campbell, Kentucky (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Carson, Colorado (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas
Violent Crime at Fort Wainwright, Alaska (US Army)
Violent Crime at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska
A List of Soldiers Targeted & Murdered for the Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance Benefits
Rep Nikki Tsongas & Rep Mike Turner Host Educational Caucus: Improving Treatment Resources for Male Survivors of Military Sexual Trauma
An Open Letter to the Senate and House of Representatives in Support of the Military Justice Improvement Act
Letter of Support for Save Our Heroes in Our Shared Quest for Military Justice Reform & Constitutional Rights

Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Fort Campbell, Kentucky (US Army)

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*This research is not complete.

Fort Campbell is a United States Army installation located astride the Kentucky-Tennessee border between Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and Clarksville, Tennessee. Fort Campbell is home to the 101st Airborne Division and the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment. The fort is named in honor of Union Army Brigadier General William Bowen Campbell, the last Whig Governor of Tennessee. -Wikipedia

Dillon Baldridge, US Army (2017): Died in Apparent Insider Attack, Afghanistan

William Bays, US Army (2017): Died in Apparent Insider Attack, Afghanistan

Isiah Booker, US Army (2017): Non Combat Related Incident, Jordan

Eric Houck, US Army (2017): Died in Apparent Insider Attack, Afghanistan

Dhaifal Ali, US Army (2016): Death Ruled Accidental Drowning

Seth Brabant, US Army veteran (2016): Homicide Victim

Jeffrey Cooper, US Army (2016): Non Combat Death, Vehicle Rollover, Kuwait

MarStratton Gordon, US Army (2016): Homicide Victim

Kyle Heade, US Army (2016): Charged with Theft/Attempted Homicide

Zachary James-Earl Ponder, US Army (2016): Charged with Homicide

Matthew Lewellen, US Army (2016): Ambushed at Military Base in Jordan

Shadow McClaine, US Army (2016): Body Missing, Homicide

Kevin McEnroe, US Army (2016): Ambushed at Military Base in Jordan

James Moriarty, US Army (2016): Ambushed at Military Base in Jordan

Marcus Rogers, US Army (2016): Failing to Follow Military Orders

Deashawn Thomas, US Army (2016): Homicide/Suicide

Katelyn Thomas, US Army spouse (2016): Homicide Victim

Zackery Alexander, US Army (2015): Charged with Homicide

Joseph Bankston, US Army dependent (2015): Homicide Victim

John Dawson, US Army (2015): Wounds Suffered when Attacked by Small Arms Fire, Afghanistan

Liperial Easterling, US Army (2015): Homicide Victim

Terrence Harwell, US Army (2015): Homicide Victim

Cornell Hurley Jr, US Army (2015): Homicide

Kevin Rodriguez, US Army (2015): Preventable Training Accident Death

Chelcee Sine-Garza, US Army (2015): Attempted Homicide Victim

Annely Turner, US Army spouse (2015): Attempted Homicide

Malcolm Turner, US Army (2015): Attempted Homicide

David Wi, US Army (2015): Charged with Homicide

Christian Martin (2014): Mishandling Classified Info/Simple Assault

Robbie Knight, US Army (2012): Homicide

Frederic Moses, US Army (2012): Homicide Victim

Jeremy Priddy, Civilian (2012): Homicide Victim

Nery Ruiz, US Army (2012): Sexual Abuse/Sodomy of Child

Benjamin Schweitzer, US Army (2012): Reckless Homicide

Michael Korolevich, US Army (2011): Homicide

Kathleen McGee, US Army spouse (2011): Homicide Victim

Linzi Jenks, US Army spouse (2010): Homicide Victim

Robert Jenks III, US Army (2010): Homicide

Ashley Barnes, US Army (2009): Homicide Victim

Khaleefa Lambert, US Army (2009): Homicide

Tracy Birkman, US Army (2008): Non Combat Death, Iraq

Jennifer Cole, US Army (2008): Negligent Homicide, Iraq

Brent Burke, US Army (2007): Homicide

Tracy Burke, US Army spouse (2007): Homicide Victim

Karen Comer, US Army family (2007): Homicide Victim

Steven Green, US Army (2006): Rape/Homicide of Iraqi Civilian

LaVena Johnson, US Army (2005): Death Ruled Suicide, Iraq

Hasan Akbar, US Army (2003): Homicide/Death Sentence

Barry Winchell, US Army (1999): Homicide Victim

Laura Cecere, US Army (1996): Homicide Victim

Max Roybal, US Army spouse (1996): Acquitted of Homicide

David Housler Jr, US Army (1994): Homicide Conviction Overturned

Fort Hood Military Police Sgt. Calvin Aguilar, US Army, Found Dead in Copperas Cove, Texas (2016)

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Sgt. Calvin Aguilar, US Army

Sgt. Calvin Aguilar, 32, US Army, was found dead in Copperas Cove, Texas on August 4, 2016. Sgt. Aguilar’s home of record is listed as Hayward, California and he joined the Army in October 2006. Sgt. Aguilar was a working dog handler assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade at Fort Hood. He deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from December 2007 to March 2009 and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan from January 2012 to January 2013. He was married with one daughter and the proud owner of Nico, a military working dog he was reunited with. At the time of the Fort Hood press release, the circumstances surrounding the incident were under investigation.

Sgt. Aguilar was the kind of person you can only hope to encounter once in your life. He wore many hats: brother, friend, counselor, drinking buddy, designated driver, wingman, jokester. He was the calming presence in the midst of chaos. He had a sixth sense about it: he knew when you were off your game and he would do anything in his power to make you right again. –Obituary

Related Links:
Obituary: Sgt. Calvin W. Aguilar
A canine’s farewell: Soldiers pay tribute to faithful working dog
It’s a dog’s life after Army retirement
It’s a dog’s life after Army retirement
‘Every one of them is a hero’: Group helps working dogs retire with dignity
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier
Fort Hood officials ID soldier found dead in Copperas Cove
Fort Hood announces death of a soldier in Cove
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead identified
Deceased Fort Hood Soldier Identified
Fort Hood military police sergeant found dead
Ft. Hood identifies Soldier found unresponsive last week
Army to investigate mistreatment claims by injured, ill soldiers at Fort Hood
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas
Reunion of MWD Nico P432 and his former handler, Calvin Aguilar, together again (YouTube)
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

“Retiring MWD Nico P432 (U.S. Army) is reunited with battle buddy SGT. Calvin Aguilar. After serving together in Afghanistan, they were apart for one year. Aguilar adopted Nico, and Mission K9 Rescue raised the funds for Nico to be shipped from Weisbaden, Germany to Texas.”

Fort Carson Army Soldier Branden Harms Pleaded Guilty to Child Abuse Resulting in Death; Faced 40-48 Years in Prison at Sentencing (2016)

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Branden Harms, US Army

Fort Carson soldier Branden Harms, 28, admitted to raising his hand against 4-month-old Ava Bermudez inflicting injuries severe enough to kill her on April 18, 2016. Harms was entrusted to care for his girlfriend’s newborn daughter. Investigators say the injuries were inflicted while the child’s mother, also his live-in girlfriend, Jessica Bermudez, went out with a friend. Harms was arrested by the Fountain Police on April 19, 2016. Branden Harms pleaded guilty to child abuse resulting in death and also admitted to withholding medical care. He faced 40-48 years in prison at sentencing on May 16, 2017.

Taking a deep breath in court, Harms described how he “almost saw black” and then began to “excessively spank her. Sometime after that, I began to choke her,” he said. “Further after that, when I was putting her in her crib, I wasn’t gentle.” The former soldier suggested that he threw the girl into her crib with enough force to split its wooden bottom, sending the infant to the floor beneath. “After that,” he added, “I kind of snapped to, and it was too late.” –Colorado Gazette

Related Links:
Fountain man accused of murdering 4-month-old baby
Arrest made following death of 4-month-old
Fort Carson soldier arrested for death of 4-month-old
Fort Carson soldier charged in death of 4-month-old girl
Fort Carson soldier charged in death of 4-month-old girl
Fort Carson infantry scout jailed in connection with child’s death
New Information About Man Arrested For 4-Month-Old’s Death
Soldier to face trial in beating death of 4-month-old girl in Fountain
Fort Carson soldier acknowledges killing infant girl
Fort Carson soldier acknowledges killing infant girl
Ex-Fort Carson soldier admits to baby’s fatal injuries
Former Fort Carson soldier, Branden Harms, acknowledges killing infant girl
Man accused of killing infant pleads guilty
Violent Crime, Suicide and Non Combat Death at Fort Carson, Colorado (US Army)

Fort Hood Soldier Staff Sgt. Brian Reed, US Army, Found Dead of Gunshot Wound at Off-Post Residence in Copperas Cove, Texas (2016)

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Staff Sgt. Brian Reed, US Army

Staff Sgt. Brian Michael Reed, 40, US Army, was found dead of a gunshot wound at his off-post residence in Copperas Cove, Texas on March 14, 2016. Staff Sgt. Reed’s home of record is listed as Corpus Christi and he entered the Army in August 2005 as an infantryman. He later changed jobs to an explosive ordnance disposal specialist and was assigned to the 79th Ordnance Battalion at Fort Hood. Staff Sgt. Reed deployed to Iraq from August 2006 to September 2007 and to Afghanistan from April 2011 to April 2012. Copperas Cove police reported there were no immediate signs of foul play but an autopsy was ordered to determine the cause of death.

Related Links:
SSG Brian Reed (photo)
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier
Fort Hood IDs soldier found dead off-post
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead in off-post residence
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead at home in Copperas Cove
Army Explosive Ordinance Disposal tech found dead with gun shot wound
Why Have So Many Fort Hood Army Soldiers Died Stateside in the Last Year?
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska (Army & Air Force)

Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson

*Research not complete

Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson: On July 30, 2010, the 673d Air Base Wing activated as the host wing combining installation management functions of Elmendorf Air Force Base’s 3rd Wing and U.S. Army Garrison Fort Richardson and consists of four groups that operate and maintain the Joint Base for air sovereignty, combat training, force staging and through output operations in support of worldwide contingencies. The installation hosts the headquarters for the United States Alaskan Command, 11th Air Force, U.S. Army Alaska, and the Alaskan North American Aerospace Defense Command Region. The 673 ABW comprises of 5,500 joint military and civilian personnel, supporting America’s Arctic Warriors and their families. The wing supports and enables three Air Force total-force wings, two Army brigades and 75 associate and tenant units.

Esteban Santiago, Alaska Army National Guard (2017): Shooting Rampage Inside Fort Lauderdale Airport

Shareef Abdullah, US Army (2015): Convicted of of sexual assault and abusive sexual contact; reduced to E-1, confined for six years, and dishonorably discharged.

Alexander Denson, US Army (2015): Convicted of false official statement, aggravated sexual assault, assault with force likely to produce death or grievous bodily harm, simple assault and communicating a threat; reduced to E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, confined for 68 months, and bad-conduct discharge.

Frederick Jenkins III, US Army (2015): Fatal Motorcycle Crash

Dakota Simmons, US Army (2015): Convicted of willfully disobeying a superior commissioned officer and assault consummated by a battery upon a child under the age of 16; confined for 34 months and 15 days and bad-conduct discharge.

Jeremiah Smith, US Army (2015): Convicted of failure to obey a regulation and false official statement; acquitted of maltreatment and abusive sexual contact; reduced to E-7.

Timothy Worlds, US Army (2015): Convicted of aggravated assault and assault consummated by a battery; acquitted of sexual assault and maiming; reduced to E-1, confined for 23 months and bad-conduct discharge.

Okan Cetinbag, US Army (2014): Died of Gunshot Wound; Cause of Death Unknown

Samuel Davis, USAF (2014): Medical, Died from Complications after Back Surgery

Lagina Griffiths, Civilian (2014)
ER woman arrested for sexual assault
APD Arrests Woman for Sexual Assault, Coercion Against Airman
Woman charged with sex assault of airman
Sexual assault case involving airman shocking even to Anchorage police
Woman sexually assaulted sleeping airman, police say
Woman Accused of Sex Assault Against Airman Changes Plea
Anchorage woman sentenced for sexual assault
Alleged blackmailer sentenced for sexual assault
Eagle River woman sentenced to 4 years for sex assault of US airman
Woman Sentenced to 4 Years in JBER Airman’s Sexual Blackmail

Katrina Jackson, USAF (2014): Died of an Apparent Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound

Darian Miller, USAF (2014): OSI Investigation, Cause of Death Unknown

Ashley Ard, US Army (2013): Accused of Leaving Baby in Park to Die, Final Disposition Unknown

Tony Earl Bullock Jr, Army (2013)
JBER Soldier Arrested in Armed Rapes of Women

Lane Douglas Wyatt, USAF (2013)
JBER Airman Accused of Drunk Driving Death, Woman Killed
Inside the crash that killed Citari Townes-Sweatt
Family Sues Chilkoot Charlie’s After Daughter Killed in DUI Crash
Man sentenced in 2013 DUI death
Airman gets 18-year sentence in fatal drunken-driving collision
Alaska airman gets 18-year sentence for DUI death
Former Airman sentenced to 18 years in drunken-driving death tells story

Marshall Drake Jr, US Army (2012): Convicted of Involuntary Manslaughter; Sentenced to 11 years, 9 months in Prison
Army Identifies Soldier in JBER Christmas Death
Soldier guilty in barracks killing
Alaska-based soldier found guilty in fellow GI’s shooting death
Soldier gets 12 years in Christmas Day killing at Alaska base
Local soldier gets 12 years for fatal shooting in Alaska
JBER Soldier sentenced for involuntary manslaughter
Ceremony will honor Rochester-area native found dead on Alaska Army base

David Lopez, US Army (2012): Convicted of Murder, Sentenced to 62 Years
Soldier charged with murder
JBER Soldier’s Murder Trial Begins in Wife’s Shooting
Jury deliberates in murder trial of ex-JBER soldier
Former JBER soldier sentenced to 62 years for killing wife
Former JBER soldier receives 63-year sentence in wife’s murder

Sara Lopez, US Army Spouse (2012): Homicide Victim

Jose Nataren, US Army (2012)
Soldier convicted of sexual assault
Soldier gets 12 years for sex assault, adultery
Army Soldier Sentenced to 12 Years in JBER Sexual Assault

Clinton Reeves, US Air Force (2012): Homicide Victim

James Thomas, USAF (2012): Homicide, Sentenced to 32 Years in Prison

Grant Wise, US Army (2012): Homicide Victim

Jacob Brouch, US Army (2011): Not guilty on Manslaughter Charge, Sentenced to Four Months for Weapons Misconduct

Michelle Clark, Alaska Army National Guard (2011): Died of Unknown Causes, Cold Case

Christopher Crosby, US Army (2011): Died of Gunshot Wound in Army Barracks

Michael McCloskey, US Army (2011): Died During Game of Russian Roulette, Jacob Brouch Charged with Manslaughter But Found Not Guilty

Aaron Rentfrow, US Army (2011): Convicted of Pre-Meditated Murder, Strangling

Tonya Rentfrow, US Army Spouse (2011): Homicide Victim

Renee Sinkler, US Army (2011): Killed in a Nighttime Attack, Afghanistan

Kip Lynch, US Army (2010): Convicted of 1st Degree Murder in Raquell Lynch’s Death, 2 Counts of 2nd Degree Murder for Wife & Daughter, Sentenced to 80 Years

Kyirsta Lynch, US Army Dependent (2010): Homicide Victim

Raquell Lynch, US Army Spouse (2010): Homicide Victim

Darryn Andrews, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Bowe Bergdahl, US Army (2009): Went Missing from Base in Afghanistan, Facing Desertion Charges

Clayton Bowen, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Kurt Curtiss, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Matthew Martinek, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Michael Murphrey, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Morris Walker, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Daniel Sexton, US Army (2008): Died of injuries sustained in non-combat related incident, Iraq

Thomas Tinsley, US Air Force (2008): Death Ruled Suicide by the Air Force 

Johnathan Chism, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Michael Hensley, US Army (2007): Acquitted of premeditated murder; convicted of planting AK-47 and disrespecting a commanding officer; sentenced to time served

Shawn Falter, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Jacob Fritz, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Michael Hullender, US Army (2007): Died of wounds sustained when IED detonated near unit during combat patrol operations

Johnathon Millican, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Trista Moretti, US Army (2007): Died when unit was attacked by insurgents using indirect fire, Iraq

Jorge Sandoval Jr., US Army (2007): Acquitted of Murder in 2 Deaths, Iraq

Colby Umbrell, US Army (2007): Died of wounds suffered when IED detonated near vehicle, Iraq

Brennan Gibson, US Army (2006): Died when Roadside Bomb Struck Humvee

Joseph Strong, US Army (2006): Killed Conducting Mounted Patrol, Iraq

Douglas Tinsley, US Army (2006): Killed Conducting Mounted Patrol, Iraq

Ronnie Gaines, US Army (2000): Pleaded guilty to aggravated assault of Jonathan Walker; sentenced to 8 years in prison and dishonorable discharge

Related Links:
4 U.S. soldiers abducted, killed (2007)
Families of Soldiers Killed in Karbala Cope with Loss (2007)
The 6 U.S. Soldiers Who Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl (2014)

Navy Reserve Cmdr. Christopher Kalafut Died of a Non-Combat Related Incident at Al Udeid Air Base in Doha, Qatar (2014)

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Cmdr. Christopher Kalafut, US Navy Reserve

Navy Commander Christopher Kalafut, 49, of Oceanside, California died of a non-combat related incident on October 24, 2014 at Al Udeid Air Base in Doha, Qatar. He was found dead in his room. Cmdr. Kalafut was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom on behalf of the Naval Amphibious Liaison Element, Combined Forces Air Component Center at U.S. Central Command. Cmdr. Kalafut graduated from the Merchant Marine Academy in 1987 and entered active duty as an E-2C Hawkeye pilot. He spent some time on the USS Abraham Lincoln and spent six years in the service before leaving and entering the Navy Reserve. He had a civilian job as a pilot for Delta in Atlanta, Georgia. At the time of the DoD press release, the incident was under investigation. The official cause of death is unknown.

He flew with the reserves less often in recent years. The July deployment, a non-flying position, was seen as a final step before retirement. –Steve Kalafut (father)

Related Links:
Obituary: Cmdr. Christopher “Chris” Edward Kalafut
Navy Cmdr. Christopher E. Kalafut
DoD Identifies Navy Casualty
Navy officer dies in Qatar
Navy pilot from Acworth dies in Qatar
Navy commander from Oceanside killed overseas
Navy Officer And Father Of Five Dies In Qatar
San Diego Naval Officer Dies in Qatar
Naval Commander From Oceanside Who Died in Qatar Identified
Navy officer found dead at Qatar air base was pilot nearing retirement, dad says
Navy Officer Found Dead in Qatar Was Pilot Nearing Retirement
Tribute To Our Fallen Soldiers – US Navy Cmdr. Christopher E. Kalafut, 49, of Oceanside, CA


Cmdr. Christopher E. Kalafut, US Navy