Massachusetts School of Law Interviews Veteran Jennifer Norris About Violent Crime in the Military & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Massachusetts School of Law explored violent crime in the military with Jennifer Norris, Military Justice for All, and the impact it has on civilians too. Jennifer talked about her experiences with four different perpetrators within the first two years of her enlisted career, the reporting & adjudication process, and the retaliation that ensued and eventually ended a fifteen year career. Also discussed was the jurisdictional hurdles that arise with a transient population like the military. For example, Jennifer was not able to press charges against one perpetrator because he moved out of state after learning he was getting reported. Another perpetrator was active duty Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, therefore a state National Guard commander did not have jurisdiction of a federal employee. And finally, although Jennifer was able to move forward with two other cases involving high ranking National Guard members with over eighteen years of service, unlike the civilian world, after the cases were adjudicated, they retired with full military retirement benefits and no public records.

Jennifer also shared that although the Department of Defense downplays violent crime in the military and sexual assault appears to be closely monitored by some female members of Congress, everything is not under control. The crime appears to be escalating. The military doesn’t just have a sexual assault issue, they have a domestic violence and homicide issue as well. They also have a pattern of ruling soldier’s deaths both stateside and overseas as suicides, training accidents, and illness despite families strongly protesting and evidence revealing otherwise. Domestic violence is more likely to lead to homicide and unfortunately the two issues have not been given the attention they deserve because until you do the research yourself and see how many families and communities have been impacted by the crimes, suspicious death, and homicide of a soldier or civilian, you wouldn’t know because Congress and the main stream media do not give it the attention it deserves. Homicide and independent investigations of all suspicious deaths should be given the highest priority not only because people have lost their lives and families deserve answers but because someone needs to be held accountable. We must prevent others from becoming victims of these crimes too.

Jennifer discussed the lasting impacts the crimes and retaliation had on her. Jennifer was empowered after doing all that she could do to protect others from getting harmed by the same people, but her squadron did not see it the same way. After the cases were adjudicated, Jennifer faced hostility from a couple of the perpetrator’s friends and her Chain of Command once she returned back to work. She eventually had to transfer to another squadron. It was the professional and personal retaliation that made her start feeling more intense feelings of anxiety, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. And unfortunately her next squadron wasn’t any more welcoming then the last. She was told shortly after arriving that ‘no female makes it in the satellite communications work center’ and that she was experiencing hostility from her new Chain of Command because the old squadron called and informed them she was a ‘troublemaker.’ The retaliation had a direct impact on her mental health and cemented an already traumatizing experience with further abuse, indifference, and judgement. By the time she got to her third squadron (almost ten years after the first attack), she learned that the Department of Veterans Affairs treated Post Traumatic Stress resulting from military sexual trauma.

After Jennifer informed her third squadron that she was getting help for the PTS at the Department of Veterans Affairs, she was immediately red flagged and asked to leave the squadron until she could produce a note from her doctor giving her permission to be at work. She did this and jumped through the other hoops asked of her in an attempt to save her career but lost confidentiality in the process. Jennifer walked away from her career in the end because she refused to release her VA records for a security clearance investigation. The entire experience not only opened her up to judgement again (simply because she asked for some counseling due to what someone else did) but she had to prove that she was ‘fit for duty’ while the perpetrators were enjoying full military retirement benefits. Jennifer chose a second chance at a civilian career when she refused to release her confidential VA records for her security clearance investigation because she wanted to ensure a future free of a tainted security clearance. It makes zero sense that someone who is a victim of crime be negatively impacted by the crimes of others in yet another way. The hypocrisy of the system is truly revealed when you look at how the perpetrators were let off the hook but the victim of crime loses their military career because they had the strength to first report and then eventually ask for help.

Army Doctor Col. Dennis Taylor Attempted to Kill Wife Carol in an Effort to Escape Domestic Abuse and Threats to Commander After Asking for Divorce

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Army Col. Dennis Taylor was court martialed at Fort Carson, Colorado and found guilty by a jury of ten off his peers for the attempted murder of his wife Carol. (Photo credit: Investigation Discovery)

Lt Joe Kenda of Homicide Hunter featured another case where he was tasked with investigating what hospital officials suspected was an attempted murder. Upon arrival at the hospital, he was bombarded by the press because they heard the call for service over the scanner. The hospital was secure and police officers were on the scene. Upon an initial briefing, Lt Kenda discovered that a nurse suspected that someone had tampered with one of their patient’s IVs. Lt Kenda then interviewed Carol Taylor, the wife of an Army officer also present at the hospital with their two children.

Lt Kenda learned that Carol had broken her leg and had developed some blood clots. She was simply visiting with her husband and children when all of a sudden the alarm on the IV infusion machine went off. And somehow the IV had been pulled from her arm. Lt Kenda immediately began to suspect that someone was trying to kill her because it looked like someone had either tampered with or inserted something into the IV line. Because the crime lab was not proficient in the hospital’s medical equipment, they called in a hospital employee who was considered an expert. This person determined that someone had injected something into the line. The only other people in the room were her husband and children.

Lt Kenda started his next line of questioning with the husband. He learned that Lt Col Dennis Taylor served in the US Army for 27 years and was currently working as the Chief of Oral Surgery at the Fitzsimmons Army Medical Center in Aurora, Colorado. Lt Kenda observed that the doctor was unusually calm and appeared to be minimizing the event and brushing it off as a mistake. So then Lt Kenda went back to the wife and asked her if she thought that maybe her husband did this. The wife claimed she was fine and that everyone was making a big deal out of it and she just wanted it to go away. She claimed that they had a great marriage and life. Lt Joe Kenda had a hard time believing that her marriage was as perfect as she made it out to be and moved forward with the investigation because there was in fact liquid in the IV pump that was not supposed to be there.

Kenda reached out to a family friend who worked alongside the doctor over the years. He learned from Stan that the doctor had confided in him that Carol was verbally abusive, demeaning him, telling him he is pathetic, and even punched him. She also was upset about his drinking and knew that he had been having extra-marital affairs. Stan told Kenda that the doctor wanted to leave Carol but she had threatened to go to his commander and report him for the drinking and adultery (both considered UCMJ infractions and punishable under military law) if he left her. Carol enjoyed the privileges of being a military wife too much to lose them to divorce. He felt trapped in his current abusive marriage and was drinking more and having affairs as a way to cope with his current situation. In the civilian world, Carol would not be able to get away with threatening her husband because it is not illegal to drink and have affairs.

As it turns out, the results of the pump came back and they found Diazinon, which is a poison used to kill ants, spiders, cockroaches, etc. She would have been dead in a matter of minutes and would have been in excruciating pain, as the poison would have burned her from the inside out. As a result, Kenda arrested the doctor for attempted murder. During the arrest he found a plunged hypodermic in his pocket. The doctor told him he didn’t need an attorney and admitted his guilt. He told Kenda that earlier that morning while he was out shopping, the idea came to him that this was the only way out. Because he is a doctor, he knew how to do it. He inserted the poison and the alarm went off so he pulled the IV out of her arm for fear of arrest.

Instead of the civilians pressing forward with a case, the Army decided that they were going to court martial the doctor. They claimed they wanted to make an example of the disgraced colonel in front of a jury of his peers. He was sentenced to 18 months hard labor and he and his family were stripped of all Army privileges. And this may be why Carol Taylor protected her husband despite the fact that he just tried to kill her. Why would the Army doctor rather kill his wife then report the domestic violence to the commander? Why would the doctor feel that going to the commander was not an option and his only way out of this abusive situation was to murder his wife? Why was the doctor so intimidated by the threat of his wife reporting what would be considered minor infractions, even under UCMJ standards?

We need to evaluate why the doctor felt that he was not able to report the abuse and threatening to the Commander. Would he automatically be in trouble with military leadership if he admitted that he had been drinking and having affairs? Was he concerned about losing his career, his retirement, or facing disciplinary action? Why did he feel that he had to choose murder over reporting the threats and abuse to his commander? These are all things that we must ponder. We are seeing a pattern over and over. Our military men do not feel that reporting to the commander is an option when they are the victim of a crime. If that is the case, how can we help our military men, who find themselves the victim of threats, domestic violence, or sexual assault, report to a safe place? Right now, some would rather resort to murder then report the crimes to their commander. There must be a better way.

Related Links:
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Fort Carson, Colorado
Only Way Out: Army Wife Threatens to Report Doctor to Commander if He Leaves Her


When the lifeless body of Willie McCarty is found at the base of a staircase, neighbors direct Kenda to a mysterious truck spotted fleeing the scene. Then… Kenda must solve a bizarre case of poisoning at a busy downtown hospital. -Investigation Discovery

Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at United States Military Bases

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*Research not complete.

My experiences as a victim of crime in the United States military inspired me to do the work I do today as a military justice policy analyst. Not only did I witness first hand how a predator operates but I witnessed multiple predator types in real time while serving my country. If these people committed these acts of crimes at work in the civilian world, they would have been in jail or I would have been rich after taking my employer to civil court. Well maybe not because the deck is stacked against the accuser but we do in fact have a civilian justice system that allows us to hold others accountable, while it simultaneously protects the due process rights of the accused. This cannot be said of the military justice system. There is no guarantee a military Commander will do anything with a crime report let alone process the felony crime effectively. We do not want a justice system where one man or woman decides whether to do nothing, give a non judicial punishment for a felony crime, or railroad the accused or accuser. We do want a justice system where we can hold our employer accountable without roadblocks from the Pentagon, Congress, and the Feres Doctrine. We cannot effectively tackle the violent crime issue in the military until the victims of crimes, like sexual assault and domestic violence, feel safe enough to report. Crime victims have expressed that they do not want to report crimes to a Commander for fear of retaliation. The Department of Defense admitted that of those of who did report the crime, 62% perceived that they faced retaliation. If service members felt safe enough to report, it could help us prevent homicide, suicide, and non combat death.

If we think about violent crime committed by military personnel compared to violent crime statistics in the United States (reference above graph), at first glance it appears the military has a homicide ‘issue’ among the ranks. Please see the below links for a sample of crime on some of the U.S. military bases. All military bases worldwide will eventually be included in this research. And the research for sexual assault, rape, domestic violence, and physical assault specifically has not been conducted yet either. Because the research is far from being complete, it is too early to make any assumptions so I will put the data in one place and let you come to your own conclusions. But if military crime mirrors civilian crime statistics, one can deduce that if the military has a lot of homicide, there is even more rape. Currently the number one concern in the military is a Commander’s ability to give a non judicial punishment for a felony crime. A Commander can bypass the courts martial process simply by punishing and/or discharging the accused with a preponderance of the evidence. This does nothing to protect our military personnel and the civilians who live near our bases in America and worldwide. Predators do not discriminate. They are just as likely to harm civilians as they are military personnel. They know their rights and they know that jurisdiction issues and lack of communication among law enforcement agencies will help prolong getting caught. We need to be one step ahead.

We can’t get real violent crime numbers for the military bases unless we include those who died of non combat deaths while they were deployed. Veterans Noonie Fortin and Ann Wright inspired me to initially look into the non combat deaths of female soldiers overseas because they observed the unusually high number of female soldiers who died of non combat deaths during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Their chief concern was that although the military labels a non combat death as a suicide, there are suspicions that some female soldiers were murdered, like LaVena Johnson, Amy Tirador, and Ciara Durkin. I did the research on every single female soldier who died from non combat deaths overseas and their concerns are valid. My research on non combat deaths in Iraq alone revealed that roughly 30% of female soldiers died as a result of homicide, suicide, and other unknown causes. I am working on collecting the data for male soldiers who died from non combat related injuries in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other areas. I started with 2010 so we can get the most recent cases but I will go back to September 11, 2001 in the next phase of data collection. The first male soldier non combat death case I found in 2010 was an unsolved homicide. His name was SSG Anton Phillips and he was stabbed to death in Afghanistan. Further research in this area has uncovered that non combat deaths of male soldiers are just as prevalent.

Learn more:
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Bragg, North Carolina (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Campbell, Kentucky (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Carson, Colorado (US Army)
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas
Violent Crime at Fort Wainwright, Alaska (US Army)
Violent Crime at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska
A List of Soldiers Targeted & Murdered for the Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance Benefits
Rep Nikki Tsongas & Rep Mike Turner Host Educational Caucus: Improving Treatment Resources for Male Survivors of Military Sexual Trauma
An Open Letter to the Senate and House of Representatives in Support of the Military Justice Improvement Act
Letter of Support for Save Our Heroes in Our Shared Quest for Military Justice Reform & Constitutional Rights

A List of Soldiers Targeted & Murdered for the Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance Benefits (SGLI)

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This research is not complete. As a matter of fact, it has only just begun. This list was created as a result of one google search and the discovery of a few cases as research is conducted in other areas. The majority of these murder for life insurance cases are examples of civilian women targeting mostly Army soldiers. Criminals are in fact targeting soldiers for lifetime benefits including monthly financial benefits, housing, medical, and the Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance. The best armor is education. If it seems too good to be true then it probably is. If it appears that your significant other is especially interested in financial matters despite just meeting them, red flag. If they appear adept in how the military works and begin controlling you by threatening to go to your Commander, is that love? How many other soldiers did they marry or date before you? Often we want to overlook things for the sake of peace and the benefit of the children involved. Is it fair that you are an after thought and all that really matters is your paycheck? Be careful of who you let in your world and who you marry. Most of these cases involve a woman targeting a male soldier. Was there substance abuse and/or domestic abuse prior to the final act of homicide? Did they verbally threaten the soldier’s life? Did the soldier feel trapped because they had nowhere to turn without risking their career? How can we prevent these crimes from happening in the future?

All our soldiers need a safe place to turn if they suddenly realize they are trapped in a situation they didn’t bargain for. Spouses literally have a license to abuse on a federal military base. The Commander cannot hold them accountable because they are civilians. Civilian authorities do not have jurisdiction on federal bases. Who holds civilian spouses accountable on federal bases for crimes against soldiers? How often is the soldier punished and held accountable for the spouse’s behavior? Will reporting these crimes mean risking losing their career? Are our male soldiers afraid they won’t be believed or they will be belittled by their Chain of Command and Commander? The spouses who have you murdered in the end for the life insurance are the same spouses that will level false allegations against you, use the children as a weapon, and blow your money while you are fighting wars and risking your life in Iraq and Afghanistan. Our soldiers need a safe way to exit domestic abuse situations without worrying about this same spouse lying to the Commander to manipulate the narrative. This is why seasoned investigators would benefit our soldiers to help evaluate and assess the situation in an effort to keep people safe and prevent further harm. We cannot ‘believe all women’ as evidenced by the female perpetrators in the majority of these life insurance motivated homicide cases. As of now we are dependent on the assessment of one Commander. It all depends on who can tell the best sob story. You have a 50/50 chance at justice in the military if you are dealing with some kind of sociopath hell bent on revenge because you rejected them. Is this why soldiers are not reporting domestic abuse and instead ending up dead?

In Their Name:
James Goodyear, US Air Force (Orlando, Florida, 1971)*
Kenneth Barnes, US Army (Fort Gordon, Georgia, 1972)*
Lee Hartley, US Navy (Jacksonville, Florida, 1982)*
Bill Lipscomb, US Air Force (Lackland AFB, Texas, 1986)
Anthony Riggs, US Army (Fort Bliss, Texas, 1991)*
Joseph Snodgrass, US Air Force (Clark AFB, Philippines, 1991)
David Russo, US Navy (Lemoore Naval Air Station, California, 1994)*
Elise Makdessi, US Navy (NAS Oceana, Virginia, 1996)*
Doug Gissendaner, US Army Veteran (Auburn, Georgia, 1997)*
Kevin Spann, US Army (Fort Gordon, Georgia, 1997)*
Marty Theer, US Air Force (Fayetteville, North Carolina, 2000)*
Lynn Reister, US Army (Fort Bliss, Texas, 2002)*
David Shannon, US Army (Fort Bragg, North Carolina, 2002)*
Jeremy Meyers, US Army (Fort Lewis, Washington, 2003)
Gary Prokop, US Army (Fort Hood, Texas, 2003)*
Paul Berkley, US Navy Reserve (Raleigh, North Carolina, 2005)*
Michael Severance, US Air Force (Dyess AFB, Texas, 2005)*
Donald Gower, US Army (Fort Hood, Texas, 2007)
Gilbert Hart, US Army Retired (Clarksville, Tennessee, 2009)*
Remano Campbell, US Army Veteran (Mobile, Alabama, 2011)*
Travis McGraw, US Air Force Reserve (Saluda, North Carolina, 2011)
Isaac Aguigui, US Army (Fort Stewart, Georgia, 2014)*
Alphonso Doss, US Navy (Orange Park, Florida, 2014)*
John Eubanks, US Army (Fort Stewart, Georgia, 2014)*
Brandon Horst, US Army (Minnesota National Guard, 2014)*
Michael Walker, US Army (Aliamanu Military Reservation, Hawaii, 2014)
Michael Andrews, US Army (Fort Benning, Georgia, 2015)*
Dmitry Chepusov, US Navy (Armed Forces Network, Germany, 2015)*
Jonathan & Lenin Otero, US Army (Florida National Guard, 2015)
Nathan Paet, US Air Force (Nellis AFB, Nevada, 2015)*
Elizabeth Shelton, US Navy (Naval Station Norfolk, Virginia, 2015)**
David Wi, US Army (Fort Campbell, Kentucky, 2015)

The asterisk (*) denotes that the soldier was a victim of homicide or attempted homicide for the insurance money. **Elizabeth Shelton and unborn baby survived the murder-for-hire plot.

Veteran James Jennings Jr Casualty of ‘Suicide by Cop’ in Richland County, South Carolina (2016)

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Richland County Sheriff’s Department says a man who engaged in an hours-long standoff with law enforcement agents on August 8th was a former member of the military and suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. James Jennings Jr., 69, died from multiple gunshot wounds to the upper body, one self-inflicted. Police were called to a domestic situation at Jennings’ residence. Jennings barricaded himself inside his home and police responded after he pointed a weapon at his wife and threatened to kill her. “He wanted us to kill him,” said the Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott. After he went down he was transported to the hospital where he later died from the injuries. The Sheriff’s Department said that Jennings suffered from PTSD after serving in the military and believes it played a role in his death.

“It is real, these people are suffering and they need help.” Sheriff Lott

Sheriff: Man in “suicide by cop” case was ex-military with PTSD

Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Bragg, North Carolina (US Army)

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(Photo courtesy of http://www.reuters.com)

*Research not complete and includes combat deaths

Fort Bragg equips, trains, rapidly deploys, and sustains full spectrum forces supporting Combatant Commanders from a Community of Excellence where Soldiers, Families and Civilians thrive.

2017:

Roshain Brooks, US Army: Died while engaged in combat operations, Iraq
Huey Dyer, US Army Dependent: Homicide, Army soldier Matt Dyer’s dog
Christopher Harris, US Army: Vehicle-borne IED detonated, Afghanistan
Jarren Heng, US Army: Sentenced to 12 months probation for role in killing Huey
Jonathon Hunter, US Army: Vehicle-borne IED detonated, Afghanistan
Weston Lee, US Army: Died from Injuries while Conducting Security, Iraq
Marinna Rollins, US Army Veteran: Killed estranged husband’s dog Huey, suicide
Allen Stigler, Jr., US Army: Died while engaged in combat operations, Iraq

2016:

Iris Armstrong, US Army: Homicide victim, murdered by spouse
David Penix, US Army: Homicide Victim
Grant Shanaman, US Army: Found Dead in Off Post Home
Johnathan Simpson, US Army: Accused of raping fellow soldier
Ryan Walker, US Army: Charged with homicide of fellow soldier
David Winchester, US Army: Found Dead in Barracks

2015:

Javore Blackwell, Civilian: Charged with homicide of Fort Bragg soldier
Joseph Carreiro, US Army: Found dead in barracks, COD unknown
Jeanie Ditty, US Army: Accused of murdering child with boyfriend
James Groth, US Army: Died during training at Fort Bragg
Anthony Pantano, US Army: Accused of causing woman’s death, found dead
Nicholas Roberts, US Army: Killed in military training accident at Fort Bragg
Pablo Ruiz, US Army: Non Combat Related Incident, Afghanistan
Joshua Wheeler, US Army: Died from enemy small-arms fire, Iraq
Robert Williams, Civilian: Charged with homicide of Fort Bragg soldier

2014:

Brian Arsenault, US Army: Died from enemy small-arms fire, Afghanistan
Adacia Bruton, US Army: Charged with homicide of Fort Bragg soldier
Michael Cathcart, US Army: Died from enemy small arms fire, Afghanistan
Michael Donahue, US Army: Died of Wounds Suffered from Enemy Attack
Girard Gass, US Army (2014): Non Combat Related Incident, Afghanistan
James Groth, US Army: Died during training at Fort Bragg
Samuel Hairston, US Army: Died while engaging the enemy, Afghanistan
Matthew Leggett, US Army: Died while engaging the enemy, Afghanistan
Cory Muzzy, US Army: Injured in life-fire training accident at Fort Bragg
Joseph Riley, US Army: Died After Enemy Attacked Vehicle with IED, Afghanistan
Darrell Robinson, US Army: Cause of Death Unknown
Omar Velez-Pagan, US Army: Sentenced to 30 years for homicide
Jonathan Walker, US Army: Non Combat Related Incident, Qatar

2013:

Allen Thomas, US Army Veteran: Homicide-Suicide
Sean Wells, US Army: Homicide victim, case unsolved, cold case
Darron Wright, US Army: Killed in parachute malfunction accident

2012:

Christopher Blackett, US Army: Plead guilty to homicide, imprisoned, suicide
Kelli Bordeaux, US Army: Homicide victim by convicted sex offender
Sebastian Gamez, US Army: Charged with homicide, final outcome unknown
Joshua Eisenhauer, US Army: Attempted homicide
Nicholas Holbert, Civilian: Homicide of army soldier, sentenced to life
Giocondo Navek, Civilian: Reportedly killed girlfriend, colleague, & self
Wade Page, US Army Veteran: Murdered six people then killed self
Jeffrey Sinclair, US Army: Improper Relationships, Demoted & Fined

2011:

Seth Andrews, US Army: Murder-Suicide
Kenneth Clark, US Army: Acquitted of murdering Fort Bragg soldier
Brandon Mims, US Army: Acquitted of shooting death of Fayetteville man
Breon Smith, US Army: Homicide victim

2010:

Nicholas Bailey, US Army: Negligent homicide, Iraq
Mathew Golsteyn, US Army: Army reopens investigation into war crimes
Morganne McBeth, US Army: Non combat death, homicide

2009:

Jacob Swanson, US Army: Murder-suicide

2008:

Kyle Alden, US Marine Corps: Accessory in cover-up of homicide
Matthew Kvapil, US Army: Homicide of co-worker, sentenced to life
Edgar Patino, US Army: Homicide of soldier, sentenced to 16-20 years
Matthew Rhoads, US Army: Cause of death unknown
Christina Smith, US Army: Spousal homicide victim
Richard Smith, US Army: Spousal homicide, sentenced to life
Megan Touma, US Army: Pregnant, homicide victim
Holley Wimunc, US Army: Domestic violence, homicide victim
John Wimunc, US Marine Corps: Spousal homicide, sentenced to life

2007:

Alan Austin, US Army: Non-combat related accident, Afghanistan
Michael Barbera, US Army: Accused of war crimes, Army dropped charges
Sandy Britt, US Army: IED detonated near unit during combat ops, Iraq
Jesse Clowers, US Army: IED detonated near vehicle, Afghanistan
Joan Duran, US Army: Non-combat related incident, Iraq
Michael Fielder, US Army: Non-combat related incident, Iraq
Erick Foster, US Army: Insurgents attacked unit during combat ops, Iraq
Jordan Goode, US Army: Wounds suffered from IED, Afghanistan
David Heringes, US Army: IED detonated near unit during combat ops, Iraq
Jeffrey Kettle, US Army: IED detonated near vehicle, Afghanistan
Charles Kitowski, US Army: IED detonated near vehicle, Afghanistan
Joshua Morley, US Army: Insurgents attacked unit during combat ops, Iraq
Tracy Willis, US Army: Insurgents attacked unit during combat ops, Iraq
Donovan Witham, US Army: IED detonated near vehicle, Iraq

2005:

Leroy Alexander, US Army: Vehicle struck by IED, Afghanistan
Charles Robinson, US Army: Vehicle struck by IED, Afghanistan
Jeffrey Toczylowski, US Army: Injuries sustained during combat operations
James Valentine, US Army Spouse: Murder-Suicide
Ronna Valentine, US Army: Victim of homicide

2003:

Andrew Baddick, US Army: Died in rescue attempt of another soldier, Iraq

2002:

Sherman Cooley, US Army: Arrested for homicide of fellow soldier
Andrea Floyd, US Army Retired: Homicide Victim
Brandon Floyd, US Army: Homicide-Suicide
Cedric Griffin, US Army: Charged with first degree murder
Jacob Jarrell, US Army: Homicide victim
Jonathan Meadows, US Army: Attempted homicide
Rigoberto Nieves, US Army: Murder-suicide
David Shannon, US Army: Homicide Victim
Joan Shannon, US Army Spouse: Homicide
William Wright, US Army: Charged with murder, killed self awaiting trial

2000:

John Diamond, US Army: Homicide of USAF Officer
Frank Theer, US Air Force: Homicide Victim
Michelle Theer, US Air Force Spouse: Homicide of USAF Husband

1999:

Forest Nelson, US Army: Homicide

1995:

James Burmeister, US Army: Homicide of 2 People
William Kreutzer, US Army: Sentenced to life in prison for homicide
Randy Meadows, US Army: 3 years probation for role in homicides of 2 people
Malcolm Wright, US Army: Homicide of 2 People

1993:

Lisa Bryant, US Army: Homicide victim
Erwin Graves, US Army: Homicide of fellow soldier

1987:

Kimberly Ruggles, Civilian: Rape & Homicide Victim

1986:

Ronald Gray, US Army: Rape & Homicide; Death Sentence
Laura Vickery-Clay, US Army: Rape & Homicide Victim

1985:

Cara Eastburn, US Air Force Dependent: Homicide Victim
Erin Eastburn, US Air Force Dependent: Homicide Victim
Kathryn Eastburn, US Air Force Spouse: Homicide Victim
Timothy Hennis, US Army: Rape & Homicide; Death Sentence

1980:

Lawrence Hill, US Army: Died in parachute accident
Alvin Williams, US Army: Acquitted of death of military officer

1970:

Jeffrey MacDonald, US Army: Convicted of Homicide, Appealing

Related Links:
A War at Home
The Fort Bragg Murders
Fort Bragg’s Deadly Summer
4 Wives Slain In 6 Weeks At Fort Bragg
Rash of Wife Killings Stuns Ft. Bragg
Rash of Wife Killings at Ft. Bragg Leaves the Base Wondering Why
Army Instituting Broad Inquiry at Fort Bragg After 4 Killings
Army’s Malaria Drug Linked To Three Fort Bragg Wife Killings
Base Crimes. The military has a domestic violence problem.
A History of Shootings at Military Installations in the U.S.
Sikh shooting latest violent link to Fort Bragg
Fort Bragg, Page’s Army base had white supremacists
Fort Bragg soldier killed in skydiving accident
82nd Airborne paratrooper killed at Fort Bragg, the latest in a series of military training deaths
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2007)

Army Pfc Karlyn Ramirez Found Shot to Death in Home, Army Veteran Dolores Delgado Plead Guilty & Army Sgt Maliek Kearney Awaiting Trial (2015)

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Pfc. Karlyn Ramirez, US Army

Army soldier Pfc. Karlyn Ramirez, 24, of Fort Meade, Maryland was found shot to death in her home on August 25, 2015 while she lay next to her newborn baby. Karlyn worked for the National Security Agency (NSA) and had a top secret security clearance. Investigators looked to her roommate and her husband as persons of interests. The media speculated that maybe this crime had something to do with her job. The Anne Arundel Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigation worked jointly to solve Karlyn’s homicide. A $20,000 reward was offered for information leading to the arrest of a suspect. More then a year later on October 6, 2016 Karlyn’s husband Army Sgt. Maliek Kearney and his new girlfriend Army veteran Dolores Delgado were arrested for the murder. In testimony, Sgt. Kearney admitted to shooting Karlyn four times, placing their baby in her dead mother’s arms, and then fleeing the scene leaving a sliding glass door open. Investigators report that the crime was a well thought out and executed plan implemented in an effort to throw homicide detectives off.

Dolores Delgado gave Sgt. Kearney the car, the gun, and gas cans to refuel with so he wouldn’t be caught on any security cameras as he drove from South Carolina to Maryland on August 24th to carry out the murder. Sgt. Kearney returned back to work the next morning at Fort Jackson in South Carolina to establish an alibi. Additional testimony revealed that Karlyn and Sgt. Kearney separated only two weeks after they had been married. They had been married for roughly five weeks when Karlyn was murdered. Karlyn attempted to get a restraining order on Sgt. Kearney just days before the murder after he showed up to her home unannounced in an effort to reconcile with her. After the failed attempt at reconciliation, Sgt. Kearney was hospitalized because he tried to end his life with sleeping pills. Sgt. Kearney was a decorated Army veteran of 15 years who had served tours in Iraq, Pakistan and South Korea. One of Sgt. Kearney’s superiors at Fort Sam Houston testified that he has been “nothing but an exemplary soldier.” A friend reported that he had no idea that Sgt. Kearney and Dolores Delgado were even dating. Sgt. Kearney  and Dolores Delgado are being prosecuted by the federal courts because they crossed state lines to execute a murder in another state. The U.S. Magistrate denied bail for Sgt. Kearney and Dolores Delgado and ordered they be transferred to Maryland to await trial. In August 2017, Dolores Delgado plead guilty to helping Sgt. Kearney with the murder of Karlyn Ramirez.

“He is sick and depraved. Slightly laughable was his compassionate transfer to San Antonio to be close to the child he put in her dead mother’s arms.” -Assistant U.S. Attorney Sarah Wannarka

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Maliek Kearney and Karlyn Ramirez

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Karlyn Ramirez, 24, was killed in her Maryland home. When police found her, she wasn’t alone. But the only living witness can’t say who killed her. -Crime Watch Daily

Military Wife Conspired with Two Men to Murder Navy Commander Alphonso Doss for One Million Dollar Life Insurance Policy, Yolinda Doss Awaiting Trial (2014)

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Cmdr. Alphonso Doss, US Navy

Navy Commander Alphonso Doss was found dead in his Astoria Hotel room in Orange Park, Florida on February 12, 2014. Both the local civilian authorities and Naval Criminal Investigation Services (NCIS) investigated the circumstances surrounding the homicide. Authorities learned that Alphonso’s estranged wife Yolinda was the mastermind behind the plot to murder her husband. The motive was the one million dollar life insurance policy. Yolinda was having an affair with Anthony Washington, 29, and she manipulate him by using domestic abuse claims as a way to motivate Washington to kill the man who was ‘harming’ her. Washington assaulted, strangled, and stole from Commander Doss claiming he didn’t like the way he treated Yolinda. Washington tried to claim self defense at trial but the jury found him guilty of first degree murder, burglary, and assault. In November 2016, Washington was sentenced to life in prison. Yolinda Doss, 44, and Ronnie Wilson II, 33, do not have trial dates set.

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U.S. Navy Commander Alphonso Doss, 44, was slain at a hotel in Orange Park about two weeks ago. -Action News Jax

Army Soldier Shawn Woods Died Saving a Woman Stabbed in Back by Boyfriend, Chase Devyver Sentenced to 31 Years in Prison (2014)

Shawn Woods

Sgt. 1st Class Shawn Woods, US Army

Sgt. 1st Class Shawn Woods (JBLM, Washington) was fatally stabbed Sunday, January 19, 2014 while trying to stop an assault outside his home. Chase Devyver was arguing with his girlfriend in the early morning hours in a parked car in front of their residence. When the girlfriend exited the vehicle and began walking toward the house, the defendant followed and stabbed her from behind. Shawn awoke to the screams and intervened in the assault but Devyver stabbed him to death. Shawn Woods died protecting a domestic assault victim. She was hospitalized but lived. He is a hero. Woods was slated to retire from the military after serving 20 years on active duty. Devyver was sentenced to 31 years.

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Amber Lowery’s Remains Identified; Husband & Army Veteran Michael Lowery Found Guilty of First Degree Murder and Sentenced to Life (2013)

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Amber Lowery, US Army Veteran Spouse

Amber Lowery, 34, went missing on July 23, 2013. Her brother reported her missing on July 24th. Days later on July 31st, human remains were found on the Lowery property; they were later identified as Amber Lowery. As a result, Army veteran Michael Lowery, 34, was arrested and charged with the murder of his wife. Amber’s siblings described Mike Lowery as a controlling individual who received counseling for anger management, was “kicked out” of the Army for drug use and insubordination, and was fired from several jobs because of the abuse of his wife while on the job. A Texas jury found Lowery guilty of murdering Amber, dismembering her body, placing her remains in a pile, and burning them. Michael Lowery was sentenced to life in prison for first degree murder.

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