Gangs in the US Army Documentary


“It seems like more and more gang members joined in order to get free military training and gain new skills that they can use when they are back in their street gangs. This epidemic of gang members in the US army, marines and even the navy is getting worse. It seems like the background checks aren’t that accurate and can’t always detect who’s legit vs who’s a criminal.”

Related Links:
Gangs infiltrate US military
Gang Activity in the U.S. Military
Gangs Penetrate the US Military
2011 National Gang Threat Assessment
The modern US army: unfit for service?
Military Overlooks the Hate in Its Ranks
Neo-Nazis, gangs and criminals in the US military
In the Army Now: Gangs, Nazis & the Mentally Ill
U.S. Army battling racists within its own ranks
Irregular Army : A Conversation With Matt Kennard
Reports Back Op-Ed Linking Vets to Hate Groups
The US Military Has Become A Haven For Hate Groups
American ISIS: The Domestic Terrorist Fallout of the Iraq War
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts
The FBI Announces Gangs Have Infiltrated Every Branch Of The Military
Military-Trained Gang Members Worry FBI, Oklahoma Law Enforcement
Red, White and Gangs: The problem of street gangs in the military
Sikh temple shooter promoted extremist views during his Army years
Sikh Temple shooter formed White supremacist views in U.S. military
Author: Sikh Temple Massacre is the Outgrowth of Pervasive White Supremacism in U.S. Military Ranks
Matt Kennard presents his new book Irregular Army at the Baltimore Radical Bookfair Pavilion
How Neo-Nazis and Gangs Infiltrated the U.S. Military: Matt Kennard’s ‘Irregular Army’
Irregular Army: How the US Military Recruited Neo-Nazis, Gang Members, and Criminals to Fight the War on Terror
FBI says U.S. criminal gangs are using military to spread their reach (2006)
Criminal Gangs in the Military (2007)
Are Gang Members Using Military Training? (2007)
The Yale Law Journal: Gangs in the Military (2009)

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USMCFallen Marine’s mother fought for Swenson’s Medal of Honor

Susan Price says her world was upended when she found out her son was killed.

But the pain of losing a child to war would be compounded as she learned that the mission he was on was poorly planned and poorly executed, with a lack of support from aircraft and artillery that might have made a life-saving difference. It was further compounded by the fact that unlike Marine Cpl. Dakota Meyer, who received a Medal of Honor two years ago for risking his life to help recover the bodies of Kenefick and others killed that day, Swenson, who criticized the chain of command during the investigation into what went wrong in Ganjgal, had to wait.

Read more: http://www.stripes.com/news/us/fallen-marine-s-mother-fought-for-swenson-s-medal-of-honor-1.247235

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Veterans Crisis Line

Living through nine suicides: After the deaths of so many friends, sailor determined not to lose another

WASHINGTON — The first suicide was in 2007. Mike Little was preparing to head to Iraq for a year when he heard that his close friend, a National Guardsman who had inspired Little to join the military, had killed himself.

The second was before Little deployed to Afghanistan, about two years later. He couldn’t go to the funeral because he was due on a plane. The next three came during the naval reservist’s yearlong deployment in Afghanistan. Another suicide happened just as he got home, in late 2010. He’s up to nine now.

“At this point, I’m taking it personally,” he said. “I deployed twice, I came home, I struggled. I feel responsible that I didn’t reach out to them. Maybe if I had …”

Little, a petty officer 2nd class in the Naval Reserves, fought his own battle with suicidal thoughts and won, as much as any person still struggling with depression and post-traumatic stress can say they’ve won.

He has trouble sleeping. He calls the Veterans Crisis Line almost weekly.

Read more: http://www.stripes.com/living-through-nine-suicides-1.240240

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PTSDReturning combat doctors suffering from PTSD

As thousands of foreign troops withdraw from Afghanistan, many soldiers are returning home with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD. Much of the attention has been focused on infantry troops. But PTSD has also taken a heavy toll on those who were sent to Afghanistan to save lives.

Listen here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-01/returning-combat-doctors-suffering-from-ptsd/4992226

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Thank You For Your Service‘Thank You For Your Service’ follows soldiers after battles are over

In ‘Thank You For Your Service,’ David Finkel follows post-war soldiers (and their families) as they struggle with PTSD and fight a battle within.

Buy book: http://www.amazon.com/Thank-Your-Service-David-Finkel/dp/0374180660

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/la-ca-jc-david-finkel-20131006,0,259858.story

Army SSG John Russell Killed Five Fellow Soldiers at a Mental Health Clinic in Iraq (2009)

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SSG John Russell, US Army

On May 11, 2009, SSG John Russell gunned down five of his fellow comrades at a mental health clinic at Camp Liberty in Iraq with his M-16. It was revealed that he had an argument with someone at the clinic, left, and came back with his gun. His crimes were determined to be premeditated. He was arrested and subsequently charged with murder and aggravated assault of another soldier that was seriously injured. Days before the killings witnesses noticed that he was distant and having suicidal thoughts. He was also scheduled to leave Iraq in a few days. He was tried for the murders of his fellow comrades and found guilty. He was sentenced to life in prison. But his family feels that the Army should also take responsibility for their actions. The family believes that John was broken and not treated for the injuries he sustained in combat, in the line of duty. SSG Russell was being treated for symptoms associated with Post Traumatic Stress with medications but it is believed that the psychotropics the military psychiatrists prescribed to him may have played a role in his actions. He was described as a kind, caring man up until the day he committed the unforeseen murders against his fellow soldiers.

Army IDs Sgt. John M. Russell as the shooter who killed 5 fellow soldiers at Iraq base
U.S. soldier charged with murder in Iraq shooting deaths
Army Sgt. that killed 5 comrades in Iraq a Sherman native
Father: Army ‘Broke’ Soldier Held in Kilings
Did Doctors Deny Iraq Shooter’s Stress?
U.S. Soldier Charged in Baghdad Shooting Was Due to Leave Iraq Soon
Horror and stresses of Iraq duty led US sergeant to kill comrades
When PTSD Comes Marching Home
Military Mental Health Crisis Exposed With Camp Liberty Killings
Trial date set in case of officer’s murder
Wait for court-martial in fratricide case frustrates victim’s family
Army judge orders soldier who killed five in Iraq to be hypnotised
Army sergeant pleads guilty to 2009 killing of fellow soldiers
US soldier ‘coolly smoked a cigarette’ before shooting dead five of his comrades in Iraq, court hears
US soldier who shot five troops was ‘broken’ by counsellors
Judge: Soldier premeditated murder of 5 at Iraq combat stress clinic
U.S. soldier found guilty of 5 premeditated killings in Iraq
Sgt. John Russell: Wrenching testimony in penalty phase
Soldier who killed fellow U.S. troops in Iraq gets life sentence
US army sergeant jailed for life over Iraq killings
Psychiatry in the Military: The Hidden Enemy—Full Documentary
Violent Crime at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington