STARZ Premiered ‘Leavenworth’: Docu-Series Examines Army 1st Lieutenant Clint Lorance Afghanistan ‘War Crimes’ Case (October 20, 2019)

Academy Award-winning filmmaker Steven Soderbergh and executive producers Paul Pawlowski and David Check tell the story of First Lieutenant Clint Lorance. Watch the Official Trailer for the upcoming STARZ Original Docuseries, Leavenworth, premiering October 20 on the STARZ App. (August 28, 2019)

STARZ Overview of ‘Leavenworth’: “From executive producers Paul Pawlowski, David Check and Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Steven Soderbergh comes a controversial true-crime story that plays out in the military justice system. Clint Lorance is serving a 19-year sentence for murder at the United States Penitentiary, Leavenworth. While deployed in Afghanistan in July 2012, the former lieutenant ordered fire on three local men riding a motorcycle, killing two of them and outraging his platoon. In a firsthand account of a soldier navigating the U.S. Army’s legal system, Lorance seeks to overturn his conviction, which provokes an emotional debate between supporters and detractors that rises to the national stage. As determinations on Lorance’s fate unfold, questions probe not only the merits of his conviction but analyze the system at large, and they ultimately test the balance of guilt and innocence in the inscrutable circumstances of today’s wars.”

In the News:

A New Docu-Series Follows a Controversial True Story Playing Out in the Military Justice System. -Fox 4 Now (October 22, 2019)

Jamie Lorance, Clint’s cousin, and Don Brown, lead attorney on the Lorance legal team, call on President Trump to release Clint Lorance from his 19-year prison sentence. -Fox and Friends (October 27, 2019)

Related Links:
Free Clint Lorance (website)
Leavenworth | STARZ Media Room
Leavenworth | Official Trailer | STARZ
Leavenworth | Fox 4 Now
Updates on Army LT Clint Lorance’s Case – Fox and Friends
‘Leavenworth’: TV Review | Hollywood Reporter
Review: ‘Leavenworth’ Puts the Army on Trial | New York Times
‘Leavenworth’ Trailer: Steven Soderbergh’s Starz Doc Tells a True Crime Military Story
Steven Soderbergh To Exec Produce True-Crime Military Justice Docu-Series ‘Leavenworth’ For Starz | Deadline
A new documentary series about Clint Lorance pits the infantry officer convicted of murder against his former soldiers
‘Strongly Recommend My Kids Not Put A Uniform On’: Former Soldier Mike McGuinness, Director Paul Pawlowski Discuss ‘Leavenworth’ Docu-Series, Clint Lorance Case
Ex-Army soldier in Leavenworth prison asks Kansas judge to vacate murder conviction
Ex-Soldier in Leavenworth Prison Asks Kansas Judge to Vacate Murder Conviction
Army Lt. Clint Lorance feels 19-year prison sentence is ‘just another mission’: docuseries producers

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?

20140301-003103.jpgWhat is Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?

When in danger, it’s natural to feel afraid. This fear triggers many split-second changes in the body to prepare to defend against the danger or to avoid it. This “fight-or-flight” response is a healthy reaction meant to protect a person from harm. But in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this reaction is changed or damaged. People who have PTSD may feel stressed or frightened even when they’re no longer in danger.

PTSD develops after a terrifying ordeal that involved physical harm or the threat of physical harm. The person who develops PTSD may have been the one who was harmed, the harm may have happened to a loved one, or the person may have witnessed a harmful event that happened to loved ones or strangers.

PTSD was first brought to public attention in relation to war veterans, but it can result from a variety of traumatic incidents, such as mugging, rape, torture, being kidnapped or held captive, child abuse, car accidents, train wrecks, plane crashes, bombings, or natural disasters such as floods or earthquakes.

FMI from the National Institute of Mental Health, please click here.

Link

USMCFallen Marine’s mother fought for Swenson’s Medal of Honor

Susan Price says her world was upended when she found out her son was killed.

But the pain of losing a child to war would be compounded as she learned that the mission he was on was poorly planned and poorly executed, with a lack of support from aircraft and artillery that might have made a life-saving difference. It was further compounded by the fact that unlike Marine Cpl. Dakota Meyer, who received a Medal of Honor two years ago for risking his life to help recover the bodies of Kenefick and others killed that day, Swenson, who criticized the chain of command during the investigation into what went wrong in Ganjgal, had to wait.

Read more: http://www.stripes.com/news/us/fallen-marine-s-mother-fought-for-swenson-s-medal-of-honor-1.247235

Link

Veterans Crisis Line

Living through nine suicides: After the deaths of so many friends, sailor determined not to lose another

WASHINGTON — The first suicide was in 2007. Mike Little was preparing to head to Iraq for a year when he heard that his close friend, a National Guardsman who had inspired Little to join the military, had killed himself.

The second was before Little deployed to Afghanistan, about two years later. He couldn’t go to the funeral because he was due on a plane. The next three came during the naval reservist’s yearlong deployment in Afghanistan. Another suicide happened just as he got home, in late 2010. He’s up to nine now.

“At this point, I’m taking it personally,” he said. “I deployed twice, I came home, I struggled. I feel responsible that I didn’t reach out to them. Maybe if I had …”

Little, a petty officer 2nd class in the Naval Reserves, fought his own battle with suicidal thoughts and won, as much as any person still struggling with depression and post-traumatic stress can say they’ve won.

He has trouble sleeping. He calls the Veterans Crisis Line almost weekly.

Read more: http://www.stripes.com/living-through-nine-suicides-1.240240

Link

PTSDReturning combat doctors suffering from PTSD

As thousands of foreign troops withdraw from Afghanistan, many soldiers are returning home with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD. Much of the attention has been focused on infantry troops. But PTSD has also taken a heavy toll on those who were sent to Afghanistan to save lives.

Listen here: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-10-01/returning-combat-doctors-suffering-from-ptsd/4992226

Link

Thank You For Your Service‘Thank You For Your Service’ follows soldiers after battles are over

In ‘Thank You For Your Service,’ David Finkel follows post-war soldiers (and their families) as they struggle with PTSD and fight a battle within.

Buy book: http://www.amazon.com/Thank-Your-Service-David-Finkel/dp/0374180660

Read more: http://www.latimes.com/books/jacketcopy/la-ca-jc-david-finkel-20131006,0,259858.story

Gangs in the Military: Armed and Dangerous Forces (December 23, 2010)

The United States military is arguably the most powerful force in the world. But according to the FBI 15,000 men and women in uniform have ties to notorious American gangs such as MS-13, the Crips, the Bloods, and the Gangster Disciples — that’s a population that’s bigger than that of any military installation. -Part 1, RT America (December 23, 2010)

Gangs in the Military: Armed & Dangerous Forces -Part 2, RT America (December 23, 2010)

Gangs in the US Army Documentary:

Sworn to protect us from every enemy, foreign and domestic, and every day the majority of soldiers do just that ! yet some units are being compromised and turn into street gangs. An FBI report recently showed an increased gang activity within US soldiers. -Gangs in the U.S. Army Documentary

Related Links:
Gang presence in the United States military
Gangs infiltrate US military
Gang Activity in the U.S. Military
Gangs Penetrate the US Military
2011 National Gang Threat Assessment
The modern US army: unfit for service?
Military Overlooks the Hate in Its Ranks
Neo-Nazis, gangs and criminals in the US military
In the Army Now: Gangs, Nazis & the Mentally Ill
U.S. Army battling racists within its own ranks
Irregular Army : A Conversation With Matt Kennard
Reports Back Op-Ed Linking Vets to Hate Groups
The US Military Has Become A Haven For Hate Groups
American ISIS: The Domestic Terrorist Fallout of the Iraq War
The US Military Recruited Violent Felons to Support the War Efforts
The FBI Announces Gangs Have Infiltrated Every Branch Of The Military
Military-Trained Gang Members Worry FBI, Oklahoma Law Enforcement
Red, White and Gangs: The problem of street gangs in the military
Sikh temple shooter promoted extremist views during his Army years
Sikh Temple shooter formed White supremacist views in U.S. military
Author: Sikh Temple Massacre is the Outgrowth of Pervasive White Supremacism in U.S. Military Ranks
Matt Kennard presents his new book Irregular Army at the Baltimore Radical Bookfair Pavilion
How Neo-Nazis and Gangs Infiltrated the U.S. Military: Matt Kennard’s ‘Irregular Army’
Irregular Army: How the US Military Recruited Neo-Nazis, Gang Members, and Criminals to Fight the War on Terror
FBI says U.S. criminal gangs are using military to spread their reach (2006)
Criminal Gangs in the Military (2007)
Are Gang Members Using Military Training? (2007)
The Yale Law Journal: Gangs in the Military (2009)
Gangs in the military: Armed & dangerous forces part 1
Gangs in the military: Armed & dangerous forces part 2

The Wounded Platoon: A Powerful Portrait of What Multiple Tours & Post-Traumatic Stress are Doing to a Generation of Young American Soldiers (May 18, 2010)

The Wounded Platoon

Click here to watch The Wounded Platoon on PBS.

“Since the Iraq War began, soldier arrests in the city of Colorado Springs have tripled. FRONTLINE tells the dark tale of the men of 3rd Platoon, Charlie Company, 1st battalion of the 506th infantry, and how the war followed them home. It is a story of heroism, grief, vicious combat, depression, drugs, alcohol and brutal murder; an investigation into the Army’s mental health services; and a powerful portrait of what multiple tours and post-traumatic stress are doing to a generation of young American soldiers. [Explore more stories on the original website for The Wounded Platoon.]” -PBS (May 18, 2010)

Army SSG John Russell Killed Five Fellow Soldiers at a Mental Health Clinic in Iraq; Found Guilty of Premeditated Murder, Sentenced to Life in Prison (May 11, 2009)

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Honoring the Victims:

  1. Major Matthew Houseal, 54, U.S. Army
  2. Commander Keith Springle, 52, U.S. Navy
  3. Sergeant Christian Bueno-Galdos, 25, U.S. Army
  4. Specialist Jacob Barton, 20, U.S. Army
  5. Private First Class Michael Yates, 19, U.S. Army

On May 11, 2009, SSG John Russell gunned down five of his fellow comrades at a mental health clinic at Camp Liberty in Iraq with his M-16. It was revealed that he had an argument with someone at the clinic, left, and came back with his gun. His crimes were determined to be premeditated. He was arrested and subsequently charged with murder and aggravated assault of another soldier that was seriously injured. Days before the killings witnesses noticed that he was distant and having suicidal thoughts. He was also scheduled to leave Iraq in a few days. He was tried for the murders of his fellow comrades and found guilty. He was sentenced to life in prison on May 16, 2013. But his family feels that the Army should also take responsibility for their actions. The family believes that John was broken and not treated for the injuries he sustained in combat, in the line of duty. SSG Russell was being treated for symptoms associated with Post Traumatic Stress with medications but it is believed that the psychotropics the military psychiatrists prescribed to him may have played a role in his actions. He was described as a kind, caring man up until the day he committed the unforeseen murders against his fellow soldiers.

SSG John Russell, U.S. Army

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Navy Casualty
DoD Identifies Army Casualties
Army IDs Sgt. John M. Russell as the shooter who killed 5 fellow soldiers at Iraq base
U.S. soldier charged with murder in Iraq shooting deaths
Army Sgt. that killed 5 comrades in Iraq a Sherman native
Father: Army ‘Broke’ Soldier Held in Kilings
Did Doctors Deny Iraq Shooter’s Stress?
U.S. Soldier Charged in Baghdad Shooting Was Due to Leave Iraq Soon
Horror and stresses of Iraq duty led US sergeant to kill comrades
When PTSD Comes Marching Home
Military Mental Health Crisis Exposed With Camp Liberty Killings
Trial date set in case of officer’s murder
Wait for court-martial in fratricide case frustrates victim’s family
Army judge orders soldier who killed five in Iraq to be hypnotised
Army sergeant pleads guilty to 2009 killing of fellow soldiers
US soldier ‘coolly smoked a cigarette’ before shooting dead five of his comrades in Iraq, court hears
US soldier who shot five troops was ‘broken’ by counsellors
Judge: Soldier premeditated murder of 5 at Iraq combat stress clinic
U.S. soldier found guilty of 5 premeditated killings in Iraq
Sgt. John Russell: Wrenching testimony in penalty phase
Soldier who killed fellow U.S. troops in Iraq gets life sentence
US army sergeant jailed for life over Iraq killings
Psychiatry in the Military: The Hidden Enemy—Full Documentary
Violent Crime at Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington
Army SSG John Russell Sentenced to Life in Prison for the Premeditated Murders of Five Fellow Soldiers at a Mental Health Clinic in Iraq (May 16, 2013)

The Denver Post Published ‘Waging Internal War’: An Examination of the Army’s Tendency to Deploy Soldiers Who Need Medication Management (August 26, 2008)

An event on the Auraria campus aimed to help community members understand mental health issues in returning veterans. -The Denver Post (November 17, 2011)

“Chad Barrett’s war on terror started in the hours after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, when he was called to help dig bodies out of a smoking Pentagon. It ended Feb. 2, 2008, in Mosul, Iraq, when his roommate awoke to find him gasping and gurgling, with foam coming from his mouth. Barrett had been cleared for a third combat tour in Iraq despite a recent suicide attempt, crushing headaches and a mental illness treated with medication for anxiety and depression. Two months after he arrived, he killed himself by swallowing an unknown number of pills. He was the sixth soldier from Fort Carson to commit suicide in Iraq. At least 10 others have killed themselves in the U.S., nine after returning from the war.” -David Olinger & Erin Emery, The Denver Post (August 26, 2008)

An analysis of the information showed that:

• Army suicides in Iraq tripled in three years, from 10 in 2004 to 32 in 2007.

• In 2006 and 2007, 20 of the 59 soldiers who killed themselves in Iraq were deployed from a single base — Fort Hood in Texas.

• Fourteen of the soldiers who killed themselves in Iraq were 19 years old. Nearly half were 23 or younger.

Read more ‘Waging Internal War’ from The Denver Post here.

Related Links:
Understanding Mental Health in Veterans
Waging internal war – The Denver Post