How do we stop the retaliation from happening so victims of crimes in the military feel safe to report?

Even if you do go forward with a case and it’s adjudicated in your favor, it’s the retaliation that kicks our ass and de-rails our careers. Why is this happening? If you wonder why some who have been assaulted have severe PTSD, it’s the retaliation compounding the original trauma. And if you don’t report and try and soldier on, it catches up with you anyways in the form of behavioral issues and suicidal ideation. How do we stop the retaliation in the military from happening so victims of crimes feel safe to report?

Related Links:
Home Base Veteran Story: Jennifer & Lee Norris
Personal Story and Testimony of TSgt. Jennifer Norris, US Air Force Retired, Before the House Armed Services Committee in Washington DC (2013)
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members
Massachusetts School of Law Interviews Veteran Jennifer Norris About Violent Crime in the Military & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
What Happens When a Rape is Reported in the Military?

Questionable Practices Continue at Fort Belvior Warrior Transition Battalion: One Delaware Army National Guard Soldier’s Story After Injured in the Line of Duty

National Guard

Guest Post Submitted by Jill Lee

I cannot in good conscience remain silent about the treatment of our wounded and injured service members and their families. I am writing this letter on behalf of my husband Sgt. Thomas Lee. He medically retired from the Delaware National Guard’s 153rd MP Company in August 21, 2016. He deployed to Afghanistan January to September 2013. Upon returning from deployment he was sent to the Wounded Transition Battalion (WTB) at Fort Belvoir, VA in October 2013 for neck, back, shoulder, skin and stomach issues. The time frame for service members to spend at the WTB is approximately 12 months; my husband was there for 3 years. When my husband arrived, there were around 300 service members there. Every service member is assigned a nurse case manager who oversees the scheduling of appointments and does weekly check-ins with them. The nurse case manager’s job is to support and facilitate the care of service members; however, often they are misleading and at times lying to get information which is used by the command against the service members. The WTB does not promote an atmosphere of healing but rather one of harassment and punishment, where they provide the bare minimum of care, distribute medications and focus on the symptoms rather than diagnose and treat the actual issues. The WTB along with Fort Belvoir Community Hospital has failed my husband along with countless other service members. Our service members and families sacrifice so much for our country and it is a shame to see how they get treated when they return from combat broken physically and mentally.

My husband and I lived through a nightmare for the past 3 years, he was fortunate enough to survive 2 deployments only to be permanently disabled by a military doctor here in the states. Do you know what it’s like to watch helplessly someone you love whose served their country go from injured to permanently damaged and not to be able to hold any one accountable? My husband came to the WTB with 2 careers, 21 years with the Postal Service and 18 years of military service, he left the WTB unable to return to either career. Below are the events that forever changed our lives.

Continue reading

Retired Army Veteran Marinna Rollins Shot & Killed Estranged Husband’s Dog with New Boyfriend; Less Then Two Weeks After Arrested & Charged, She Committed Suicide (2017)

Screen Shot 2017-05-21 at 7.14.37 PM

Marinna Rollins, US Army Retired

Army veteran Marinna Rollins, 23, was found dead of an apparent suicide on May 7, 2017 in Fayetteville, North Carolina. According to reports, Rollins was medically retired from the Army with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after a traumatic event while stationed in South Korea. Rollins was involved in the execution style killing of her estranged husband’s dog Huey around April 16 or 17. The harrowing incident was filmed and released to the public resulting in worldwide coverage. Marinna and her accomplice, Jarren Heng, were both facing felony charges in court. Jarren Heng is an active duty soldier stationed at Fort Bragg and he still faces felony charges, although the conspiracy charge was dropped after Marinna died. Meanwhile a Facebook page was created called Justice for Huey and they are also petitioning the Army to take action. According to Marinna’s estranged husband, Matt Dyer, Marinna was watching the dog for him while he was in South Korea but at some point decided she wanted to keep the dog and didn’t want to give Huey back. Meanwhile, she registered the dog as an emotional support animal. Matt shared that he was okay with her keeping the dog because he thought Huey would be good for her PTSD. Matt and Justice for Huey have been empathetic of Marinna and believe that had Jarren Heng never entered her life, this would not have happened. Matt expressed that he was aware that Jarren hated Huey and was controlling of Marinna. Marinna and Matt grew up together in Windham, Maine and were still technically married as their divorce had not been finalized yet. Initially it appears that Marinna did try and find a home for the dog with no success. Matt thinks Jarren Heng convinced Marinna to get rid of the dog. Did Jarren Heng pressure her to get rid of the dog because it was her soon to be ex-husband’s dog? We may never know the answer to that question but nonetheless this is a very heartbreaking situation: an innocent dog lost a life, another soldier with Post Traumatic Stress lost her life, and Matt lost his childhood friend & wife and his dog.

Related Links:
Justice for Huey on Facebook
Petition: To Seek UCMJ Punishment of Army Specialist Jarren Heng
Owner of dog slain by veteran and soldier speaks out on what really happened
Accused dog killer’s sister, separated husband still trying to process ‘shocking’ incident
Marinna Rollins & Jarren Heng: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Army veteran from Maine accused of brutally killing service dog
Vet And Her Soldier Boyfriend Shot Dog 10 Times, New Report Shows
A Veteran Tied Her Service Dog to a Tree and Shot It 5 Times, Officials Say
Cops: Ex-soldier kills her service dog while her boyfriend videotapes
Prosecutor: NC military couple laughed as they fatally shot service dog
Army vet, boyfriend laugh while killing PTSD service dog, DA says
Army vet and special ops soldier boyfriend charged with shooting her service dog
Veteran Charged with Tying PTSD Service Dog to Tree, Shooting 5 Times
Bail raised for veteran, soldier accused in execution of veteran’s PTSD therapy dog
Army veteran who filmed herself killing her own service dog gets bail increase to $25K
Marinna Rollins army vet: Why I filmed myself shooting my service dog dead 5 times
Veteran who shot service dog on video found dead
Army vet who killed her service dog is found dead
Female soldier caught on video killing dog found DEAD
Marinna Rollins: Ex-Soldier Recorded Shooting Service Dog Found Dead
Windham veteran accused of executing therapy dog, posting video on Facebook, found dead
Marinna Rollins, ex-soldier who was recorded fatally shooting service dog, is found dead
Army veteran kills herself after being filmed tying service dog to tree and shooting it dead
Army veteran accused of murdering service dog commits suicide nine days before trial
Female army veteran ‘who tied her PTSD dog to a tree and killed it is found dead’
Veteran arrested in dog’s killing on Facebook found dead
Army Veteran Arrested For Murdering Her Dog Commits Suicide
Sad end to grisly episode: Ex-soldier who killed dog is found dead

Massachusetts School of Law Interviews Veteran Jennifer Norris About Violent Crime in the Military & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Massachusetts School of Law explored violent crime in the military with Jennifer Norris, Military Justice for All, and the impact it has on civilians too. Jennifer talked about her experiences with four different perpetrators within the first two years of her enlisted career, the reporting & adjudication process, and the retaliation that ensued and eventually ended a fifteen year career. Also discussed was the jurisdictional hurdles that arise with a transient population like the military. For example, Jennifer was not able to press charges against one perpetrator because he moved out of state after learning he was getting reported. Another perpetrator was active duty Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, therefore a state National Guard commander did not have jurisdiction of a federal employee. And finally, although Jennifer was able to move forward with two other cases involving high ranking National Guard members with over eighteen years of service, unlike the civilian world, after the cases were adjudicated, they retired with full military retirement benefits and no public records.

Jennifer also shared that although the Department of Defense downplays violent crime in the military and sexual assault appears to be closely monitored by some female members of Congress, everything is not under control. The crime appears to be escalating. The military doesn’t just have a sexual assault issue, they have a domestic violence and homicide issue as well. They also have a pattern of ruling soldier’s deaths both stateside and overseas as suicides, training accidents, and illness despite families strongly protesting and evidence revealing otherwise. Domestic violence is more likely to lead to homicide and unfortunately the two issues have not been given the attention they deserve because until you do the research yourself and see how many families and communities have been impacted by the crimes, suspicious death, and homicide of a soldier or civilian, you wouldn’t know because Congress and the main stream media do not give it the attention it deserves. Homicide and independent investigations of all suspicious deaths should be given the highest priority not only because people have lost their lives and families deserve answers but because someone needs to be held accountable. We must prevent others from becoming victims of these crimes too.

Jennifer discussed the lasting impacts the crimes and retaliation had on her. Jennifer was empowered after doing all that she could do to protect others from getting harmed by the same people, but her squadron did not see it the same way. After the cases were adjudicated, Jennifer faced hostility from a couple of the perpetrator’s friends and her Chain of Command once she returned back to work. She eventually had to transfer to another squadron. It was the professional and personal retaliation that made her start feeling more intense feelings of anxiety, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. And unfortunately her next squadron wasn’t any more welcoming then the last. She was told shortly after arriving that ‘no female makes it in the satellite communications work center’ and that she was experiencing hostility from her new Chain of Command because the old squadron called and informed them she was a ‘troublemaker.’ The retaliation had a direct impact on her mental health and cemented an already traumatizing experience with further abuse, indifference, and judgement. By the time she got to her third squadron (almost ten years after the first attack), she learned that the Department of Veterans Affairs treated Post Traumatic Stress resulting from military sexual trauma.

After Jennifer informed her third squadron that she was getting help for the PTS at the Department of Veterans Affairs, she was immediately red flagged and asked to leave the squadron until she could produce a note from her doctor giving her permission to be at work. She did this and jumped through the other hoops asked of her in an attempt to save her career but lost confidentiality in the process. Jennifer walked away from her career in the end because she refused to release her VA records for a security clearance investigation. The entire experience not only opened her up to judgement again (simply because she asked for some counseling due to what someone else did) but she had to prove that she was ‘fit for duty’ while the perpetrators were enjoying full military retirement benefits. Jennifer chose a second chance at a civilian career when she refused to release her confidential VA records for her security clearance investigation because she wanted to ensure a future free of a tainted security clearance. It makes zero sense that someone who is a victim of crime be negatively impacted by the crimes of others in yet another way. The hypocrisy of the system is truly revealed when you look at how the perpetrators were let off the hook but the victim of crime loses their military career because they had the strength to first report and then eventually ask for help.

Veteran James Jennings Jr Casualty of ‘Suicide by Cop’ in Richland County, South Carolina (2016)

PTSD

Richland County Sheriff’s Department says a man who engaged in an hours-long standoff with law enforcement agents on August 8th was a former member of the military and suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. James Jennings Jr., 69, died from multiple gunshot wounds to the upper body, one self-inflicted. Police were called to a domestic situation at Jennings’ residence. Jennings barricaded himself inside his home and police responded after he pointed a weapon at his wife and threatened to kill her. “He wanted us to kill him,” said the Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott. After he went down he was transported to the hospital where he later died from the injuries. The Sheriff’s Department said that Jennings suffered from PTSD after serving in the military and believes it played a role in his death.

“It is real, these people are suffering and they need help.” Sheriff Lott

Sheriff: Man in “suicide by cop” case was ex-military with PTSD

Complex Post Traumatic Stress and Dissociation in Military and Veteran Populations

b0152e8f12f3137b9d3b7f7cad4f7011

“Dissociation can be defined as disruptions in aspects of consciousness, identity, memory, physical actions and/or the environment.” –Healthy Place

Dissociation in military and veterans is an issue that doesn’t get nearly the attention it deserves yet explains a lot of things. Dissociation tends to occur mostly with those who have complex Post Traumatic Stress. It is also referred to as blacking out.

Related Links:
Dissociation Explained
Complex PTSD and Dissociative Disorder
Coming Apart: Trauma and the Fragmentation of the Self
How Trauma Can Lead to Dissociative Disorders
Working with Complex PTSD, Dissociation, and EMDR Therapy
Complex Trauma and Dissociation
Altered Circuits May Cause ‘Out-Of-Body’ Symptoms in Some People with PTSD
PTSD and Dissociation: What You Need to Know
Complex PTSD and Dissociative Identity Disorder
Complex PTSD and the Realm of Dissociation
The Dissociative Subtype of PTSD: National Center for PTSD
Reexperiencing/Hyperaroused and Dissociative States in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Dissociative Symptomatology in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Disorders of Extreme Stress
Treatment of PTSD and Disassociation

Army Reserve Veteran Micah Johnson Murdered Five Dallas Police Officers During Black Lives Matter Protest in Texas (2016)

micah-johnson-102

Micah Johnson, US Army Reserve

Micah Johnson, a US Army Reserve veteran, is accused of gunning down and murdering five Dallas police officers during a Black Lives Matter Event on July 7, 2016. This is considered one of the deadliest attacks on police officers since September 11, 2001. He was eventually killed in a stand off with police. In recent media reports we learned that Micah Johnson deployed to Afghanistan from November 2013 to July 2014. He was accused of sexual harassment while deployed to Afghanistan in May 2014. He was accused of stalking and stealing women’s underwear as well. The victim sought a protection order and told superiors he needed mental health treatment. The protection order was granted and the Commanding officer recommended an Other Than Honorable discharge and sent him home early from his deployment to Afghanistan. Johnson’s military attorney stated that this kind of punishment is unusual for an isolated incident of sexual harassment. As part of a tentative agreement, it was recommended that Johnson receive a general discharge which saves the Army time and resources needed to discharge soldiers under Other Than Honorable conditions. Instead he was eventually released from the Army with a honorable discharge in April 2015.

As a result of his actions while serving, he was not investigated and prosecuted but instead sent back home from overseas and discharged from the US Army Reserves honorably. Although we have limited information in which to base conclusions, at first glance this looks like a case of escalation of predatory behavior that starts with sexual harassment, progresses to stalking, then the individual gets brazen and starts breaking and entering to steal his victims belongings. It would only be a matter of time before the individual escalated to sexual assault, rape and then murder. It’s too early to make a definitive conclusion as we are still waiting for information to come in because this story is developing. But one thing we do know is that the US Army Reserves took the easy way out, booted Micah Johnson from the military to protect it’s service members, and unleashed him on society with no warning or records. This case is another reason why we need the military to investigate and process each and every case through the legal system so we at least have a fighting chance at prevention and escalation of crimes. If the military can’t handle or afford to investigate and prosecute each case to determine the soldier’s danger to society, then maybe they should hand over the investigation and prosecution of crimes to the civilians. This isn’t the first case they let slip through the cracks and it certainly won’t be the last.

Why wasn’t the deaths of five Dallas Police Officers enough to warrant an investigation of the way the Army handles crime? Instead the conversation was stifled in the media. The following is a list of questions sent to the Army Times and other media outlets to help them help us find answers.

• What were his behaviors prior to being reported?

• What evidence did the Commander have to grant a protection order?

• Why was the protection order for her home as well?

• Why was he sent back home from Afghanistan?

• Why did the deployed Commander recommend sexual harassment with other than honorable discharge?

• Does the Commander understand the difference between sexual harassment and escalation of a violent criminal? (sex harassment, stalking, stealing victims belongings, sexual assault, rape, murder)

• Did the deployed Commander do any follow up with Army or Army Reserves?

• Where was he sent after leaving Afghanistan?

• Did he process through Fort Hood and was anyone informed of his status?

• Why and when was he assigned an attorney? (usually not necessary for sex harassment)

• Why no follow up on what happened in Afghanistan?

• Why no punishment whatsoever for sex harassment charge, protection order?

• Why no investigation of circumstances to determine if this individual was a danger to fellow soldiers in the US?

• Why no investigation of circumstances to determine if this individual was a danger to society?

• Why only a recommendation for other than honorable discharge?

• Why no concern that this individual may harm others in the community?

• Why no concern for records and informing local community of potential danger?

• Why did Micah Johnson end up getting discharged with a honorable discharge?

• Why is media reporting that the attorney and victim cannot speak to the media?

• Do you have the money to process soldiers through the legal system?

• If you don’t have the money, why not refer the case to the civilian authorities to help you determine if this person is a danger to society?

• Why no follow up with local police after victim got a military protection order?

• Where did the victim live? On base? Off base? Was protection order coordinated between deployed commander and commander in the states?

• Where did Micah Johnson live? On base? Were others informed of the protection order and reasons why?

• Why did it take so long to discharge Micah Johnson from the military after he was sent home from Afghanistan?

• Did he continue to go to work until he was discharged?

• Did he have any other victims or accusations while serving?

• Do you keep records of reports of sex crimes if the allegation cannot be substantiated because it’s a “he said, she said” crime?

• What triggers an investigation by CID? Where are they located?

• Do you investigate if the crime is considered sex harassment?

• Why sex harassment when stalking, stealing panties, protection order, and early return home from Afghanistan?

Related Links:
America’s Love-Hate Affair With Snipers
Army report: Grenade found in room of Dallas gunman in 2014
Army investigation found problems with soldier who became Dallas police killer
Dallas shooter called mentally unstable back in 2011 in Mesquite police report
Army launches internal review of Dallas shooter Micah Johnson’s military record
Who was Micah Johnson? A more complex picture emerges
‘I just wanted a piece of him’: College officers pushed through injuries in Dallas shooting
Military Snipers: Dallas Shooter NO “Sniper”
When Army career ended in disgrace, Dallas gunman was ostracized
During Army days, Dallas shooter was a mediocre marksman
‘Kind of goofy’: Friends recall Dallas gunman’s personality
Still No Explanation for Dallas Gunman’s Honorable Discharge
Dallas cop killer Micah Johnson was BLACKLISTED by black militant group two years ago after background check branded him ‘unfit for recruitment’
The Dallas Shooter Wanted To Stay In This Anti-Semitic Black Militant Group
Dallas Shooter Faced Sexual-Harassment Allegations in Army, Military Lawyer Says
Dallas cop shooter Micah Johnson was booted from Afghanistan amid sexual harassment accusations
The latest: President Obama orders flags lowered to half-staff
Officer killed in Dallas shootings had survived 3 tours in Iraq
Dallas Police shooting: Victims served in Navy & Marine Corps, suspect had been in Army
The Dallas Shooting Suspect Had Military Experience
Dallas Shooter Accused Of Sexual Harassment In Army
Dallas gunman studied ‘shoot and move’ tactics, black nationalism
Dallas Shooter Micah Johnson Was Accused of Sexual Harassment During His Military Days
The female soldier who ‘pervert’ Dallas cop killer sexually harassed as colleague reveals murderer used to ‘steal girls’ panties’
Fellow soldier accused Dallas shooter of sexual harassment
Dallas police killer ‘sexually harassed woman soldier who warned he was unstable and pleaded for protection’
Dallas shooter stockpiled weapons and was accused of harassment
What we know about the suspected shooter in Dallas
‘Loner’ Dallas gunman had bomb materials and kept journal of combat tactics
Dallas gunman Micah Johnson honed tactics at local combat school
Dallas officers shot to death include newlywed, Iraq veteran
Neighbor recalls his conversation with the Dallas shooter
Meet the Remotec Andros Mark V-A1, the robot that killed the Dallas shooter
Dallas suspect taunted police during 2 hours of negotiation
Dallas sniper shooting: 5 police officers slain, suspect ID’d as Army vet Micah Johnson
Dallas police chief: Shooter seemed delusional, scrawled cryptic messages in blood
Micah Johnson, Dallas Cop-Killer, Was Black Militant and Army Veteran
Dallas cop killer suffered PTSD-like symptoms after Afghanistan
What Is PTSD? Micah Johnson Who Killed 5 Dallas Police Officers Showed Symptoms Of Disorder
The Army reservist who ambushed and killed 5 Dallas police officers showed signs of PTSD
Dallas shooter showed signs of PTSD when he returned from Afghanistan, VA records show
Soldier who killed 5 Dallas police officers showed PTSD symptoms, documents show
Dallas Cop Shooter Reportedly Displayed PTSD Symptoms After Afghanistan Tour
Dallas Shooter Showed PTSD Signs, But Little Was Done
Investigating impact of war on Dallas killer’s mental health
One year later: Signs of PTSD, mental illness; search for treatments
Dramatic Footage Shows Dallas Officer Shot
Dallas Shooter Micah Johnson Was Army Veteran & ‘Loner’
Micah Johnson, 25, Identified As Dallas Gunman Who Claimed To Be Army Vet
Dallas Sniper Micah Xavier Johnson Was Ex-Army Reservist
Former Army Dallas Shooter Not Trained Sniper
Dallas Shooter’s Weapons Removed by Army During Deployment
Cop Shooter Micah Johnson Booted From Army Tour For Sexual Harassment
Micah Xavier Johnson: what we know about the Dallas shooting gunman and his attack
Dallas Cop-Killer Micah Johnson Served as a Corporal in the Army Reserve
Micah Xavier Johnson: what we know about the Dallas shooting gunman and his attack
Dallas Shooter’s Family Says Military Service Changed Him
Parents of Dallas Gunman Micah Johnson: I Love My Son, I Hate What He Did
US Army opens investigation into Dallas shooters military service
Dallas Ambush Shooting: From Peaceful Protest to Chaos: Part 1
Dallas Officers Killed in Ambush Included a Father, Newlywed: Part 1
Dallas Police Chief David Brown Speaks at Dallas Shooting Memorial


As the funerals for the slain Dallas police officers continue, the investigation into the background and motive of Dallas shooter, Micah Johnson, continues. The US Army has opened an investigation into Johnson’s military service. Johnson reportedly spent six years in the Army Reserves and was accused of sexual harassment while serving. RT America’s Manuel Rapalo reports from Dallas, where police are also investigating claims that Johnson purchased an AK-47 off of Facebook for $600 before the shooting. -RT America

TSgt Steven Bellino, US Air Force (2016)

2540

TSgt Steven Bellino, US Air Force

TSgt Steven Bellino, 41, US Air Force, passed away on April 8, 2016 at Joint Base San-Antonio in Texas.

Related Links:
Obituary: Steven D. Bellino
Technical Sgt. Steven D. Bellino, Save Our Heroes
Two Airmen Fatally Shot at San Antonio Base Identified
Air Force Officials Identified Two Men Killed In Workplace Violence
Lackland AFB shooting victims identified as TSgt and squadron commander
Victims in Lackland shooting ID’d as former FBI agent, squadron commander
Gunman in Texas Air Force Base Killing Had Gone AWOL
Lackland AFB Shooter Was Facing Disciplinary Action For Going AWOL
Training Squadron Commander, Student ID’d as Airmen Dead in Air Force Base Shooting
Lackland Air Force Base Gunman in Murder-Suicide was Ex-FBI Agent
Official: Ex-FBI Agent Was Gunman in Texas Base Shooting
Suspect in Apparent Murder-Suicide at Texas Air Force Base Was a Former FBI Agent
Lackland base shooter ID’ed as former FBI agent, Iraq war veteran
Air Force: Student from Northeast Ohio killed commander at Lackland AFB
Texas Air Force base gunman was from Parma Heights, reports say
Commander ‘went out swinging’ in Lackland murder-suicide
Air Force commander ‘went out swinging’ during deadly shooting with former FBI agent at Texas base
Special Operations airman killed his squadron commander in apparent-murder suicide
Gunman in Texas Air Force base killing had gone AWOL, then taken mental health exam
A Long Career in Military’s Elite Spirals Into a Killing and a Suicide
Lackland gunman had been a standout soldier
Air Force: PTSD, other factors led airman to kill commander
Air Force reports: PTSD, other factors led airman to kill commander
Special Forces Vet Killed Himself, Commander Because Of Failing Career
Special Forces vet took two guns, a knife and a grudge into fatal meeting
In wake of Lackland shooting, Air Force aims to remove dropouts quicker
Family of Spec Ops Airman, who killed commander, alleges a USAF cover-up
A disputed suicide note and other documents trace Steve Bellino’s descent
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas

The gunman behind the fatal shooting at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland has been identified as Steven D. Bellino, a former FBI agent who later enlisted in the US Air Force. Bellino was an FBI agent for less than two years before resigning in 2013. Authorities have not confirmed why Lt. Col. William A. Schroeder was targeted in the murder/suicide attack.

Disabled Army Veteran Joseph Jeremy Weber Shot and Killed by California Police Officer After Allegedly Aggressing Upon Him with a Knife in Hand (2015)

20150413__weber21

Joseph Jeremy Weber, US Army Veteran

Army veteran Joseph Jeremy Weber, 28, was shot and killed in Sunnyvale, California by police on April 8th, 2015 after an alleged liquor-store robbery. Apparently, Weber was shot and killed by the police because he was wielding a knife despite being asked to drop the weapon multiple times. Authorities released that Joseph Jeremy Weber was a disabled veteran reportedly dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder. The confrontation was preceded by a 911 call reporting a robbery where a man took a pack of cigarettes at knifepoint from a clerk at Grewalz Liquor & Groceries. The police say the suspect continued to move toward an officer while holding a knife and this is what prompted the 13-year police veteran to open fire. Joseph Jeremy Weber later died at the hospital.

The first officer on scene confronted the suspect in an alley and the police radio recordings reveal the officer reported that the suspect was about 50 feet away at that moment. Joseph Jeremy Weber refused to drop the knife and moments later, the officers reported shots were fired and the suspect was down. The Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety contended the suspect closed the distance during the gap in transmissions. The officer’s attorney stated, “Even when (the suspect) was advancing, [the] officer was still giving commands. The suspect was within range to inflict death or great bodily injury. There’s no question.” The officer was placed on paid administrative leave, which is routine in all officer-involved shootings. The outcome of the investigation is unknown.

Related Links:
Sunnyvale officer in fatal shooting identified
Man shot, killed by police in Sunnyvale IDd
Sunnyvale: Man killed in officer-involved shooting identified
Sunnyvale: Veteran killed in officer shooting, but not missing vet with same name
Army Veteran Suffering PTSD Shot, Killed By Sunnyvale Police Following Armed Robbery
Sunnyvale: Second suspect in fatal officer-involved shooting escapes
Sunnyvale officer involved shooting, One suspect dies, other at large
Police shoot, kill armed man near Sunnyvale Motel 6
Fatal Sunnyvale police shooting: fourth in three years
Sunnyvale officer shoots, kills man near Highway 101 and Mathilda Avenue

Air Force Reserve Captain Jamie Brunette Committed Suicide After What Parents Allege May Have Been an Unreported Sexual Assault in Afghanistan (2015)

jamie-brunette4

Captain Jamie Brunette, US Air Force

Captain Jamie Brunette, 30, US Air Force, was found dead with a self-inflicted gunshot wound in her car on February 9, 2015 in Tampa, Florida. Tampa police found her in the parking lot of a Harbour Island cafe near her apartment slumped over in the back seat of a locked vehicle. She purchased the hand gun six months earlier. According to friends and family, Jamie didn’t speak much about her time in Afghanistan but her parents believe she may have suffered with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after a sexual assault while deployed to Afghanistan. The issue sheds light on whether or not military members feel comfortable reporting crimes and asking for help for the aftermath. According to one MacDill Air Force Base official, they actively encourage airman to reach out for help and assured they would not lose their careers. They also reminded airman that reaching out for help early will help prevent the Post Traumatic Stress from getting worse and in the end help save their military career.

Related Links:
Lieutenant US Air Force Jamie Brunette and Sergeant US Army Thomas Penkal
Tampa reservist’s suicide brings home tragedy
Suicide of Florida soldier recently returned from Afghanistan leads to questions of whether she was sexually assaulted overseas
Family of Afghanistan Veteran: She Committed Suicide Due To Unreported Sexual Assault
Air Force captain, 30, shoots herself dead ‘after being sexually assaulted in Afghanistan’
Jamie Brunette’s Suicide: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Friends Grapple with Suicide of Woman, 30, Who May Have Suffered from PTSD
Family believe sexual assault led to Air Force Reserve Captain Jamie Brunette’s suicide
Sexually assaulted former Air Force captain Jamie Brunette driven to suicide, family say
Captain Jamie Brunette Suicide: Mystery Surrounds Soldier Found Dead in Car – What Happened?
#22toZero: Captain Jamie Brunette and “The Moment”
Air Force veteran’s suicide sheds light on female soldiers and PTSD