15 Movies & Documentaries That Expose the Broken Military Justice System

Soldier’s Girl (Showtime):

New Army recruit Barry Winchell is assigned to a base in Tennessee. One night out to a local bar hosting a drag show. Calpernia Addams an in-transition transsexual drag queen, fascinates Barry, and they strike up a relationship. -Soldier’s Girl, Showtime (January 20, 2003)

Showtime Entertainment Released ‘Soldier’s Girl’: Based on the True Story of the Murder of Fort Campbell Army Pfc. Barry Winchell

In the Valley of Elah (Warner Bros):

“In the Valley of Elah” tells the story of a war veteran (Tommy Lee Jones), his wife (Susan Sarandon) and the search for their son, a soldier who recently returned from Iraq but has mysteriously gone missing, and the police detective (Charlize Theron) who helps in the investigation. -Warner Bros. (September 14, 2007)

Warner Bros. Premiered ‘In the Valley of Elah’: Based on the True Story of the Murder of Fort Benning Army Spc. Richard T. Davis

The Tillman Story (The Weinstein Company):

Pat Tillman never thought of himself as a hero. His choice to leave a multimillion-dollar football contract and join the military wasn’t done for any reason other than he felt it was the right thing to do. The fact that the military manipulated his tragic death in the line of duty into a propaganda tool is unfathomable and thoroughly explored in Amir Bar-Lev’s riveting and enraging documentary. -The Tillman Story (August 20, 2010)

The NFL, the MilItary, and the Hijacking of Pat Tillman’s Story

The Wounded Platoon (Frontline PBS):

The Wounded Platoon

Since the Iraq War began, soldier arrests in the city of Colorado Springs have tripled. FRONTLINE tells the dark tale of the men of 3rd Platoon, Charlie Company, 1st battalion of the 506th infantry, and how the war followed them home. It is a story of heroism, grief, vicious combat, depression, drugs, alcohol and brutal murder; an investigation into the Army’s mental health services; and a powerful portrait of what multiple tours and post-traumatic stress are doing to a generation of young American soldiers. –The Wounded Platoon (May 18, 2010)

Frontline PBS: The Wounded Platoon Documentary [Full Episode]

On the Dark Side of Al Doura (Maverick Media):

U.S. Army Ranger John Needham, who was awarded two purple hearts and three medals for heroism, wrote to military authorities in 2007 reporting war crimes that he witnessed being committed by his own command and fellow soldiers in Al Doura, Iraq. His charges were supported by atrocity photos which, in the public interest, are now released in this video. John paid a terrible price for his opposition to these acts. His story is tragic. –On the Dark Side in Al Doura (2011)

On the Dark Side in Al Doura (Iraq): Documentary Gives You an Inside Look at Toxic Leadership in the U.S. Army

The Invisible War (Cinedigm):

The Invisible War is a groundbreaking investigative documentary about one of our country’s most shameful and best kept secrets: the epidemic of rape within our US military. Today, a female soldier in Iraq and Afghanistan is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire with the number of assaults in the last decade alone in the hundreds of thousands. -The Invisible War (June 22, 2012)

Military Rape Documentary Funded and Distributed by “Serial Predator” and Hollywood Movie Executive Harvey Weinstein

Women of War Documentary (Sundance Films):

Military Sexual Trauma or M.S.T. has been a fixture in the military for as long as human war has existed, and is still quite prevalent even in today’s modern military. This feature length documentary uncovers the origins and offers solutions to M.S.T. -Women of War Documentary (February 4, 2013)

Women of War Documentary, Phil Valentine [Full Episode]

The Frozen Ground (Grindstone):

“The Frozen Ground” is inspired by the incredible true story that follows Alaskan State Trooper Jack Halcombe (Nicolas Cage) as he sets out to end the murderous rampage of Robert Hansen (John Cusack), a serial killer who has gone unnoticed for 13 years. As the bodies of street girls start to pile up in Anchorage, fear strikes a chord with the public. -The Frozen Ground (August 23, 2013)

Serial Killer & Army Reserve Veteran Robert C. Hansen Died of Natural Causes While Serving Out a Life Sentence in Alaska State Prison

The Silent Truth (Midtown Films):

Ninety-four US military women in the military have died in Iraq or during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). ‘The Silent Truth’ tells the story of one of these women, PFC LaVena Lynn Johnson, who was found dead on Balad Air Force Base in Iraq. The army claimed she shot herself with her own M16 rifle, but forensic evidence, obtained by the Johnson family through the Freedom of Information Act, brings the army’s findings into question. The Army refuses to re-open LaVena Johnson’s case, leaving the family in limbo. ‘The Silent Truth’ follows the Johnson’s pursuit of justice and truth for their daughter. -The Silent Truth Documentary (July 1, 2014)

‘The Silent Truth’ Documentary: The Rape, Murder & Military Cover-Up of Army Pfc. LaVena Johnson in Iraq

The Kill Team (PBS Independent Lens):

The Kill Team looks at the devastating moral tensions that tear at soldiers’ psyches through the lens of one highly personal and emotional story. Private Adam Winfield was a 21-year-old soldier in Afghanistan when he attempted with the help of his father to alert the military to heinous war crimes his platoon was committing. But Winfield’s pleas went unheeded. Left on his own and with threats to his life, Private Winfield was himself drawn into the moral abyss, forced to make a split-second decision that would change his life forever. -The Kill Team, (July 25, 2014)

The PBS Documentary ‘The Kill Team’ Reveals How the Military Justice System Operates in Response to Media Scandals

Gangs in the U.S. Army (A&E Television):

Sworn to protect us from every enemy, foreign and domestic, and every day the majority of soldiers do just that ! yet some units are being compromised and turn into street gangs. An FBI report recently showed an increased gang activity within US soldiers. -Gangs in the U.S. Army Documentary (2017)

Gangs in the Military: Armed and Dangerous Forces

Final Vision (Investigation Discovery):

The ID Original Movie, FINAL VISION tells the true story of Jeffrey MacDonald, a handsome, Ivy League-educated U.S. Army Green Beret doctor, who was convicted of brutally murdering his pregnant wife and two young daughters in the middle of the night. -Final Vision, Investigation Discovery (December 10, 2017)

Investigation Discovery Premiered ‘Final Vision’: The True Crime Story of Former Army Captain Jeffrey MacDonald

The Kill Team (A24):

When a young US soldier in Afghanistan witnesses other recruits killing civilians under the direction of a sadistic sergeant, he begins to fear that the men he’s serving with might be the ones to kill him. -The Kill Team (October 25, 2019)

‘The Kill Team’ Movie Released: Based on the True Story of Army Whistleblower Adam Winfield

Leavenworth (STARZ):

Academy Award-winning filmmaker Steven Soderbergh and executive producers Paul Pawlowski and David Check tell the story of First Lieutenant Clint Lorance. Watch the Official Trailer for the upcoming STARZ Original Docuseries, Leavenworth, premiering October 20 on the STARZ App. (August 28, 2019)

STARZ Premiered ‘Leavenworth’: Docu-Series Examines Army 1st Lieutenant Clint Lorance Afghanistan ‘War Crimes’ Case

Ready for War (Showtime):

Andrew Renzi sheds light on the lives of three of the estimated thousands of immigrants who volunteer for service in the American military, yet find themselves deported from the US once their tours of duty are over. -Ready for War, Showtime (November 22, 2019)

The ultimate threat for deported U.S. veterans? Drug cartels, new documentary says

‘The Kill Team’ Movie Released: Based on the True Story of Army Whistleblower Adam Winfield (October 25, 2019)

When a young US soldier in Afghanistan witnesses other recruits killing civilians under the direction of a sadistic sergeant, he begins to fear that the men he’s serving with might be the ones to kill him. -The Kill Team (October 25, 2019)

“When Andrew Briggman (Nat Wolff), a young soldier in the US invasion of Afghanistan, witnesses other recruits killing innocent civilians under the direction of a sadistic leader, Sergeant Deeks (Alexander Skarsgård), he considers reporting them to higher-ups — but the heavily-armed, increasingly violent platoon becomes suspicious that someone in their ranks has turned on them, and Andrew begins to fear that he’ll be the next target.” –The Kill Team, A24 Films

Editor’s Note: If you would like to see ‘The Kill Team’ documentary released in 2014, please click here to watch the trailer and here to watch it on Prime Video (included with Prime). If you would like to see ‘The Kill Team’ movie released in 2019, please click here to rent or purchase it on Prime Video.

Related Links:
The Kill Team | A24
The Kill Team | Facebook
The Kill Team Movie (2019) | Prime Video
The Kill Team Documentary (2014) | Prime Video
Afghanistan War Movie The Kill Team Is an Absolutely Essential Documentary
Tribeca Film Review: ‘The Kill Team’
‘The Kill Team’: Tribeca Review | Reviews | Screen
Trailer for ‘The Kill Team’ spotlights Afghanistan war murders of 2010
‘The Kill Team’ and the Moral Injury of War: A Talk With the Film Director
‘The Kill Team,’ now a feature, revisits one of the most disturbing tales of the Afghanistan war
‘The Kill Team’ Star Nat Wolff and Director Dan Krauss on the Need to Protect Whistleblowers
‘The Kill Team’ Review: Bullying on the Battlefield
‘Kill Team’: The Documentary the Army Doesn’t Want You to See
‘Kill Team’ tells tough war story about a hard choice
The American Military Is Put Under a Microscope in ‘The Kill Team’ Trailer
‘The Kill Team’ Review | Hollywood Reporter
Inner Life, During Wartime: ‘The Kill Team’
‘The Kill Team’ Film Review: Nat Wolff’s Soldier Has a Crisis of Conscience in Afghanistan
Why Dan Krauss Turned His Documentary, ‘The Kill Team,’ Into A Feature Film
‘The Kill Team’ Review: Nat Wolff Leads a Harrowing Look at What it Means to Be ‘Army Strong’
The Kill Team Follows American Troops Intentionally Murdering Innocent Afghans. It’s Based On a True Story.
‘The Kill Team’: Dan Krauss’ War Film Spotlights Moral Questions Instead Of Non-Stop Action [Review]
‘The Kill Team:’ Skarsgard excels in the film based on a true story and the 2014 Krauss documentary
Review: The Kill Team Seeks to Dispel the Illusion of a Clean War
‘The Kill Team’ review: Afghanistan war film is punishing to watch
“The Kill Team” offers atrocities, but little insight into wartime murders of civilians
Review: ‘The Kill Team’ fails to match intensity of documentary account of war crimes
The Kill Team is a bleak but unspecific war drama
U.S. Soldiers’ War Crime Gets Hollywood Treatment
The Kill Team Tells a Familiar Story from a Different Angle
Interview: Dan Krauss on Going Deeper Inside “The Kill Team”
Alexander Skarsgard talks ‘The Kill Team,’ Meryl Streep and his famous father
The Kill Team Movie Review – Common Sense Media

Warner Bros. Premiered ‘In the Valley of Elah’: Based on the True Story of the Murder of Fort Benning Army Spc. Richard T. Davis (September 14, 2007)

“In the Valley of Elah” tells the story of a war veteran (Tommy Lee Jones), his wife (Susan Sarandon) and the search for their son, a soldier who recently returned from Iraq but has mysteriously gone missing, and the police detective (Charlize Theron) who helps in the investigation. -Warner Bros. (September 14, 2007)

“Your son is missing.” It’s the phone call every soldier’s father dreads. Hank Deerfield (Tommy Lee Jones) had never thought that this call would come whilst his son was in the U.S., home from serving in Baghdad. Facing military indifference to the disappearance, Hank takes matters into his own hands. -YouTube (March 20, 2014)

“In the Valley of Elah” tells the story of a war veteran (Tommy Lee Jones), his wife (Susan Sarandon) and the search for their son, a soldier who recently returned from Iraq but has mysteriously gone missing, and the police detective (Charlize Theron) who helps in the investigation. -YouTube Movies (April 12, 2011)

“Desperate to solve the mystery behind their son’s disappearance, his father, also a war Veteran, and mother seek the help of seasoned police detective to uncover his true fate.” –In the Valley of Elah, Warner Bros.

Related Links:
In the Valley of Elah – Warner Bros.
In the Valley of Elah | Wikipedia
In the Valley of Elah – Original Theatrical Trailer
In The Valley of Elah – YouTube Trailer
In the Valley of Elah | YouTube Movies
In the Valley of Elah | Amazon Prime Video
In the Valley of Elah | EW.com
In the Valley of Elah – Rolling Stone
Soldiers “In the Valley of Elah” | The New Yorker
The Movie Review: ‘In the Valley of Elah’ – The Atlantic
In the Valley of Ellah | Film | The Guardian
In the Valley of Elah | Psychiatric Times
A Military Murder | In These Times
War hits home in ‘Valley of Elah’ – CSMonitor.com
The Story Behind New Film ‘In the Valley of Elah’
Collateral damage: The murder of Richard Davis
Iraq War Serves as Backdrop for Murder-Mystery ‘In The Valley of Elah’
Murder in Baker Company: How Four American Soldiers Killed One of Their Own

Showtime Entertainment Released ‘Soldier’s Girl’: Based on the True Story of the Murder of Fort Campbell Army Pfc. Barry Winchell (January 20, 2003)

Soldier's Girl

Movie Description: In 1997, new Army recruit Barry Winchell (Troy Garity) is assigned to a base in Tennessee. He quickly befriends the quick-tempered Justin Fisher (Shawn Hatosy), who struggles with drug problems. One night, they venture out to a local bar hosting a drag show. Calpernia Addams (Lee Pace), a transsexual drag queen, fascinates Barry, and they strike up a relationship. As Barry and Calpernia grow closer, Justin becomes bitter and recruits another soldier (Philip Eddolls) to help get revenge. (112 minutes)

Soldier’s Girl Trailer | Showtime Entertainment

The story behind the movie Soldier’s Girl.

Celebrating the 15th year anniversary of the release of cable network Showtime’s “Soldier’s Girl.” New Army recruit Barry Winchell is assigned to a base in Tennessee. One night out to a local bar hosting a drag show. Calpernia Addams an in-transition transsexual drag queen, fascinates Barry, and they strike up a relationship. Troy Garity plays Winchell and in his film debut, Lee Pace exquisitely plays the role of Calpernia.

Vanity Fair Confidential featured an episode called Don’t Ask Don’t Kill on Investigation Discovery highlighting the case of Army Pfc Barry Winchell at Fort Campbell, Kentucky in 1999. Winchell was bludgeoned to death by a fellow soldier while he lay asleep in his cot on July 5 in the barracks. Winchell was described by his friends as someone who would give the shirt off his back for you. He was a model soldier and had dreams of becoming a Warrant Officer. He was a member of the elite Screaming Eagles, 101st Airborne and was considered a perfect fit for the military. He was described by fellow soldiers as a 50 caliber expert.

After Barry Winchell died, the military immediately began downplaying what had occurred on base at Fort Campbell. They initially claimed it was a fight that had gone too far. They told the family that Barry Winchell had been kicked in the head with a boot but his injuries did not match that theory. As a result, the family and media outlets were convinced the military was hiding the real story and believed they were trying to cover up the crime. Why? The military concluded that this was a rare soldier on soldier attack in their barracks but the claim that he was kicked in the head did not match the crime scene either. Although the military was tasked with the investigation of the murder, they declined to speculate on a motive.

The Army was not cooperating with anyone. -Vanity Fair Confidential

When Barry’s girlfriend Calpernia Addams learned about what happened to Barry, he was on life support and considered brain dead. He died twelve hours after the attack and she didn’t get an opportunity to see him. Calpernia learned that he had been murdered on base and believed that there was more to this story then what the Army was sharing. As a result, she set out to make sure both Barry’s parents and the media knew what she knew and suspected had happened. Calpernia was born a boy. She served in the US Navy as a transsexual and then once she got out of the military, she began her transition from man to woman. When Calpernia and Barry met, they hit it off immediately and started dating. When she met Barry, she was halfway to becoming a woman. She lovingly shared that Barry accepted her for who she was and supported her in her transition from man to woman.

Calpernia strongly believed that people were blurring the lines between whether Barry was gay or straight. She wanted people to know that he was straight and he liked women. Calpernia believed that Barry’s troubles began with an anonymous accusation that Barry was gay. She claimed that a fellow soldier said he saw Barry giving oral sex to a man in a Nashville gay bar. But no one believed it and his military comrades didn’t think he was gay. Calpernia believed that it was Barry’s roommate, Justin Fisher, who started spreading the rumors in an effort to cause harm to Barry. In 1999 the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy was in effect and a soldier could in fact lose their career if they were found out. Justin Fisher didn’t have the best reputation. He was described as someone who thought he was a gangster even though he was from Nebraska. And some believed that Justin never should have been allowed to join the military.

According to Calpernia, Justin Fisher and Barry Winchell had a love/hate relationship. Fisher tormented him, joked about his sexuality, about him being a homosexual, and kept calling him a faggot. He told others that he didn’t trust him and eventually openly spread rumors that Barry was gay. Fisher also blackmailed Barry with his alleged homosexuality. He told their Non Commissioned Officers (NCOs) about him being gay knowing that Barry could lose his career under the Don’t Ask Don’t Tell (DADT) policy. Back in those days, once accused of being gay, you were dead in the water in a military setting. Some believe this case reveals that if gone unchecked the military can become an incubator for hate. At the time of DADT, it was virtually impossible to report anti-gay harassment and Barry’s family and friends were not quite sure how he dealt with the regular doses of harassment. As evidenced in this case and many others, he had nowhere to turn without fear of losing his cherished career.

At the time of DADT, it was virtually impossible to report anti-gay harassment without fear of losing your career. ~Vanity Fair Confidential

The military was in charge of the investigation because the crime occurred on a federal base. As with many cases, family, friends, and the media forced the Army to be accountable for what happened on their base on their watch. So as the investigation into Barry’s Winchell’s death continued, we learned what actually happened. Calvin Glover, an eighteen year old new recruit, was ultimately charged with the murder of Barry Winchell. Observers felt that he did it because of a combination of too many men, too much alcohol, and too little to do. The day before the murder, Calvin and Winchell got into a fight. Apparently Winchell dealt him one punch in the face and he went down. Calvin who was highly intoxicated swore he would get him back but Winchell apologized to him the next day and it appeared that everything was fine. Unfortunately, Justin Fisher (Winchell’s roommate) was provoking Calvin all day long asking him if he was going to take Winchell’s abuse.

That same night after Calvin Glover had consumed seventeen beers, he decided he was going to bed. Fisher went to his room and told him that Barry was telling everyone that he beat him up and they were all laughing about it. Fisher handed Calvin a wooden bat, suggested he hit Barry with it, and Calvin said he felt compelled to use it. In a drunken, peer pressured stupor, Calvin hit Barry Winchell multiple times in the head with the wooden bat. Barry Winchell was asleep and couldn’t defend himself. After Calvin was done hitting Barry, Fisher was laughing, jumping up and down, and told Calvin that they would keep it in the family. Then Calvin immediately began to destroy evidence. Fisher acted like he stumbled upon Winchell on the cot and was trying to help him. The soldiers tried calling 911 but they were not able to get through to emergency services on a base phone. Barry was taken to the hospital and twelve hours later, he was dead. Everyone in the barracks was wondering who would come in the barracks and kill them.

The soldiers tried calling 911 but they were not able to get through to emergency services on a base phone. -Vanity Fair Confidential

In the course of the investigation, Justin Fisher eventually identified Calvin Glover as the culprit. As a result of Calpernia Addams and others that stepped forward, we learned that there was more to the story underneath the surface. We learned that Justin Fisher had a much larger role in the crime then he was willing to admit. Justin Fisher introduced Calpernia Addams to Barry Winchell. Apparently Justin Fisher was interested in Calpernia Addams and after she chose Barry, he asked her if she would hook him up with one of her drag queen friends. Justin ended up hooking up with Kimmie Mayfield, who was a man. Everyone suspected that Justin was interested in guys because of his relationship with Kimmie. They hooked up several times in the course of a few months. We also learned this wasn’t Justin’s first walk on the wild side. He had a history of experimentation. Barry shared with Calpernia that one time he woke up to Justin playing with his feet. Calpernia deduced that Justin may have been jealous of Calpernia being with Barry or vice versa. It was noted that people tend to hate those who remind them of something they don’t want to face.

In the end about 90% of the soldiers who served with Barry Winchell, Calvin Glover, and Justin Fisher didn’t think this was a hate crime but instead a crime of passion. They did not witness any anti-gay rage; but they did witness too much alcohol. One of the soldiers believed that Justin Fisher also hit Barry Winchell with the bat because of the blood spatter evidence left at the crime scene. It matched someone who was left handed and Fisher was left handed. One of the soldiers mentioned this to Fisher and Fisher told him he was in the wrong career and should be a detective instead. The soldiers who served with them believed that Justin Fisher was the murderer and Calvin Glover was the murder weapon. Calvin felt pressured by Justin Fisher to hit Winchell while he was intoxicated. It is suspected that Fisher hit Winchell with the bat as well and may have been the one that dealt the fatal blows. Calvin participated in the Vanity Fair programming by phone from prison and did in fact express remorse for his role in Barry Winchell’s death.

Both Calvin Glover and Justin Fisher were court martialed. In the end, Calvin Glover was convicted of pre-meditated murder and was sentenced to life in prison with an opportunity for parole. Justin Fisher was charged as an accessory and restricted to his barracks while he was going through trial. Observers felt that it was ridiculous that Fisher was restricted to his barracks when in fact he was the mastermind of the murder. He too was convicted and sentenced to twelve and half years but was released early in 2006 after only serving seven years. Observers felt that Justin Fisher’s sentence was a miscarriage of justice considering it never would have happened if it wasn’t for him pushing Calvin Glover to hit Barry Winchell with the baseball bat that night. Justin Fisher now lives in the Mid-West and declined to comment on this Vanity Fair episode. He walks as a free man. In retrospect, Calvin Glover shared that he feels like this was a love triangle gone wrong and he wishes that he could take it all back.

At the end of the programming, Pat and Wally Kutteles (Barry’s parents) shared that they sent their son off to serve in the military, they did not send him off to be beaten to death with a bat while he was sleeping. Dixon Osborn from the Servicemen’s Legal Defense Network (SLDN) believed that the military simply wanted to sweep it under the rug with no connection to the gay reference. The military hoped the general public, the media, and Barry’s parents would just accept that it was a drunken brawl. All those involved felt like the military investigation was a joke. Calpernia Addams, Barry’s parents and friends, and the SLDN wanted to honor Barry’s memory by exposing the truth about Barry’s untimely death. They used Barry Winchell’s case as a catalyst to lift the dangerous Don’t Ask Don’t Tell policy. According to those involved, President Bill Clinton’s DADT policy was the biggest mistake ever for the military because it taught people to lie. At the peak of DADT, there were 3-4 soldiers discharged per day for their sexual orientation. DADT was a failure of the Clinton administration.

All those involved felt like the military investigation was a joke. -Vanity Fair Confidential

In an interesting twist, the Commander who was in charge at the time of the death of Barry Winchell sparked protest in Washington DC in 2000 when he was reassigned to the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the Pentagon. In response, Eric Shinseki, the Army’s Chief of Staff, stated that General Clark’s command at Fort Campbell had been “distinguished by great competence and compassionate leadership. The Army has placed its trust and confidence in Major General Clark and I am confident he will continue to excel in service to our nation.” The military concluded in a public statement that this was the first gay bashing murder in over ten years and that soldier on soldier violence was rare. In October 1999, President Clinton signed an executive order increasing penalties for hate crimes in the military justice code and allowed a sentencing authority to hear evidence that a violent crime was based on race, color or sexual orientation. However, the order only applied to crimes committed after Nov. 30, 1999.

Barry Winchell’s parents lobbied with the SLDN to help change the DADT policy after losing their son. Even though their son was not gay, he was accused of being gay which eventually led to his death. Roughly ten years later in 2010, President Barack Obama signed a historic bill ending the DADT policy, a policy that compelled gay and lesbian service members to hide their sexual orientation. The ending of the policy made it official for gays and lesbians to serve openly in the Armed Forces. President Obama said he “hopes all those who left the service because of the policy will seek to re-enlist. And he encouraged all gays to consider service.” Although, gays and lesbians were cautioned to keep their identity to themselves until the law was official in 2011. This comes as one of the first major actions by Secretary Defense Leon Panetta, who had been on the job for three weeks. SecDef Panetta also lifted the ban on women in combat in 2013. Our military is now officially equal in all respects.

American Justice:

A Fort Campbell private in the US army is bludgeoned to death by fellow soldiers. -A Soldier’s Secret, American Justice

Investigation Discovery:

It was a crime that rocked the army, and when questions about a soldier’s sexuality revealed a cover-up, Vanity Fair uncovered the chilling truth. -Vanity Fair

ID Go: An all-American soldier is found bludgeoned to death. The Army calls it a fight that went too far. But investigators discover a shocking story that starts with a nightclub showgirl and ends with two men behind bars. -Don’t Ask Don’t Kill, Vanity Fair Confidential (S1, E7)

Related Links:
Barry Winchell (1977-1999) | Find A Grave
Why Do People Have To Push Me Like That?
Hate May Have Triggered Fatal Barracks Beating
Witness: GI failed polygraph on killing
Clinton signs an order on military hate crimes
DoD Clarifies “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Policy
Young Soldier Viciously Attacked While On Military Base, Leads To Presidential Statement
Army Private Admits Murder Charge
Army Private Guilty Of Murder
Murder of GI Denounced as Gay Ends in Conviction
“Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Doesn’t Work
Anti-gay speech widespread
A statement on the murder of Private First Class Barry Winchell
Soldier Gets 12 1/2 Years in Prison for His Role in Beating Death
Oklahoman convicted Army says Sulphur man guilty in other’s murder
Army Exonerates Officers In Slaying of Gay Private
Reports Clears Army in Gay Soldier’s Death
Don’t Ask Don’t Kill: Inside the Murder of Soldier Barry Winchell
Rise in harassment of gay US soldiers
No Fortunate Son
UNITED STATES, Appellee v. Justin R. FISHER, Specialist, U.S. Army, Appellant (2003)
Boys Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, Don’t Cry
Has Clark Case Changed The Military?
Soldier’s Girl – The Reality | Calpernia Addams
Justin Fisher Released from Custody | Calpernia Addams
Soldier’s Girl – Variety
Lovers in a dangerous time
Soldier’s Girl Doesn’t Tell the Issues
Picks and Pans Review: Soldier’s Girl
‘Soldier’s Girl’ — a tragic love story / Intense, honest film about lead-up to anti-gay murder
Winchell Murder Co-Conspirator Released
Missouri Army Base Leads ‘Don’t Ask Don’t Tell’ Dismissal Rate
Gay soldier discharged for being beaten
Parents of murdered Army private speak out
Serving in Silence | Lawrence.com
Kennedy’s ‘Hate Crimes’ Help for the Military
Kennedy Smears Military in Pursuit of “Hate Crimes” Bill
Army releases soldier convicted in connection with anti-gay murder
Remembering Pfc. Barry Winchell on the 10th Anniversary of His Murder
Murdered soldier’s parents: Repeal ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’
Parents of murdered soldier, Barry Winchell, ask for DADT policy to be repealed
Don’t hate, embrace
Gay soldiers at Fort Campbell open up on coming out
Patricia Kutteles, Driven by Tragedy to End ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,’ Dies at 67
Patricia Kutteles, military mother who helped repeal ‘don’t ask, don’t tell,’ dies at 67
Patricia Kutteles, who fought against “don’t ask, don’t tell,” dies at 67
Kutteles helped end ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’
Vanity Fair Confidential to feature Winchell story
The Case for Demilitarizing the Military
Activist And Veteran Calpernia Addams Speaks On Trump’s Transgender Military Ban [Opinion]
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Fort Campbell, Kentucky (US Army)
Soldier’s Girl (2003) – Rotten Tomatoes
Soldier’s Girl (2003) – DVD Netflix
Soldier’s Girl Secrets
Soldier’s Girl Clip (2003)
A Soldier’s Secret | American Justice | A&E
How Barry Winchell’s Murder Rocked the United States Army | Psych of a Psycho
Soldier’s Girl Trailer | Showtime Entertainment
Don’t Ask Don’t Kill | Vanity Fair Confidential | Investigation Discovery (S1, E7)
S1/E5: Barry Winchell | This Week in True Crime History
Unfriendly Fire: How the Gay Ban Undermines the Military and Weakens America
Pfc. Barry L. Winchell Memorial Page | Facebook

Green Beret Doctor Capt. Howard Levy Convicted in Court-martial for Willfully Disobeying Orders & Making Disloyal Statements About U.S. Policy in Vietnam (June 2, 1967)

History-channel-logo-1

“Capt. Howard Levy, 30, a dermatologist from Brooklyn, is convicted by a general court-martial in Fort Jackson, South Carolina, of willfully disobeying orders and making disloyal statements about U.S. policy in Vietnam. Levy had refused to provide elementary instruction in skin disease to Green Beret medics on the grounds that the Green Berets would use medicine as ‘another tool of political persuasion’ in Vietnam.” Read more from This Day in History here.

Related Links:
1967 Press Photo Howard Levy
Captain Howard Levy
My Visit With Capt. Howard Levy
ACLU History: The Military
GI opposition to the Vietnam War, 1965-1973
Timeline of the G.I. Antiwar Movement
Parker v. Levy (1974)
Vietnam War | National Archives
Green Berets End Testimony in Levy Case
The Press of Peace
The Trial of Captain Levy: II
Court Rejects Cases Challenging Legality of the War
A system of law, tried and found guilty
Vietnam: Where Are They Now?
Following Up | The New York Times
The Real Story of Vietnam Veterans Against the War
Sir! No Sir! | Seattle Weekly
How GI Resistance Altered The Course Of History: “Sir, No Sir,” A Timely Film
Watada, the War and the Law | The Nation
Super Troopers | Village Voice
Back to ‘nam: Cinema looks at the USA’s other hated war
Fonda’s antiwar years are being lived anew
New life for anti-war film Pentagon suppressed
Civil rights-era lawyer for Bond, Ali dies in Fla.
Charles Morgan Jr., 78; was famed civil rights era lawyer
A Memorial Day Remembrance of Peace Activist Soldiers
Please Don’t Thank Me For My Service
The GI Revolt That Ended the Vietnam War
Attica hostages died of gunshots, not cut throats as originally reported in 1971
NY Times Belated obituary for ex-Green Beret, antiwar activist Donald Duncan
Vietnam and the Soldiers’ Revolt
Opinion: Honoring GIs and veterans who fought for peace in Vietnam
I’m Pretty Sure Sergeant Greenwald Tried To Kill Me.
The Look Magazine article from 1968
Vietnam Vets Return to My Lai, Where US Slaughtered 500 Civilians
The Vietnam War and the US Soldiers’ Revolt
Reflections on the Anti-War Documentary, Sir! No Sir!
Dr. Howard Levy Refuses Orders Over Vietnam War; Charges U.S. War Crimes
War Crimes and Vietnam: The “Nuremberg Defense” and the Military Service Resister
Vietnam War on Trial: The Court-Martial of Dr. Howard B. Levy
May 10, 1967: Army Captain Howard Levy Refuses to Train Green Berets During Vietnam War
The Court-Martial of Captain Levy: Medical Ethics vs. Military Law
Book: Sir! No Sir! – The Suppressed Story of the GI Movement to End the War in Vietnam
Movie of the Month: Sir! No Sir! | Portland Public Library
Movie: Sir! No Sir! | The New Yorker