Fort Hood CW02 Andre Nance, US Army, Found Unresponsive at Fort Rucker Hotel in Alabama While Attending Training (2017)

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CW02 Andre Nance, US Army

CW02 Andre Nance, 34, US Army, of Fort Hood was found unresponsive in his on-post hotel room at Fort Rucker, Alabama on February 27, 2017.  CW02 Nance’s home of record is listed as Randallstown, Maryland and he entered the Army in February 2004. CW02 Nance was attending the warrant officer advance course at Fort Rucker and was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, III Corps at Fort Hood. Nance deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from April 2009 to April 2010, January 2012 to March 2012, and June 2014 to March 2015. The circumstances surrounding the incident were under investigation by Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID). The official cause of death is unknown.

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Fort Hood Soldier Found Dead in Alabama Hotel
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Massachusetts School of Law Interviews Veteran Jennifer Norris About Violent Crime in the Military & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Massachusetts School of Law explored violent crime in the military with Jennifer Norris, Military Justice for All, and the impact it has on civilians too. Jennifer talked about her experiences with four different perpetrators within the first two years of her enlisted career, the reporting & adjudication process, and the retaliation that ensued and eventually ended a fifteen year career. Also discussed was the jurisdictional hurdles that arise with a transient population like the military. For example, Jennifer was not able to press charges against one perpetrator because he moved out of state after learning he was getting reported. Another perpetrator was active duty Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, therefore a state National Guard commander did not have jurisdiction of a federal employee. And finally, although Jennifer was able to move forward with two other cases involving high ranking National Guard members with over eighteen years of service, unlike the civilian world, after the cases were adjudicated, they retired with full military retirement benefits and no public records.

Jennifer also shared that although the Department of Defense downplays violent crime in the military and sexual assault appears to be closely monitored by some female members of Congress, everything is not under control. The crime appears to be escalating. The military doesn’t just have a sexual assault issue, they have a domestic violence and homicide issue as well. They also have a pattern of ruling soldier’s deaths both stateside and overseas as suicides, training accidents, and illness despite families strongly protesting and evidence revealing otherwise. Domestic violence is more likely to lead to homicide and unfortunately the two issues have not been given the attention they deserve because until you do the research yourself and see how many families and communities have been impacted by the crimes, suspicious death, and homicide of a soldier or civilian, you wouldn’t know because Congress and the main stream media do not give it the attention it deserves. Homicide and independent investigations of all suspicious deaths should be given the highest priority not only because people have lost their lives and families deserve answers but because someone needs to be held accountable. We must prevent others from becoming victims of these crimes too.

Jennifer discussed the lasting impacts the crimes and retaliation had on her. Jennifer was empowered after doing all that she could do to protect others from getting harmed by the same people, but her squadron did not see it the same way. After the cases were adjudicated, Jennifer faced hostility from a couple of the perpetrator’s friends and her Chain of Command once she returned back to work. She eventually had to transfer to another squadron. It was the professional and personal retaliation that made her start feeling more intense feelings of anxiety, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. And unfortunately her next squadron wasn’t any more welcoming then the last. She was told shortly after arriving that ‘no female makes it in the satellite communications work center’ and that she was experiencing hostility from her new Chain of Command because the old squadron called and informed them she was a ‘troublemaker.’ The retaliation had a direct impact on her mental health and cemented an already traumatizing experience with further abuse, indifference, and judgement. By the time she got to her third squadron (almost ten years after the first attack), she learned that the Department of Veterans Affairs treated Post Traumatic Stress resulting from military sexual trauma.

After Jennifer informed her third squadron that she was getting help for the PTS at the Department of Veterans Affairs, she was immediately red flagged and asked to leave the squadron until she could produce a note from her doctor giving her permission to be at work. She did this and jumped through the other hoops asked of her in an attempt to save her career but lost confidentiality in the process. Jennifer walked away from her career in the end because she refused to release her VA records for a security clearance investigation. The entire experience not only opened her up to judgement again (simply because she asked for some counseling due to what someone else did) but she had to prove that she was ‘fit for duty’ while the perpetrators were enjoying full military retirement benefits. Jennifer chose a second chance at a civilian career when she refused to release her confidential VA records for her security clearance investigation because she wanted to ensure a future free of a tainted security clearance. It makes zero sense that someone who is a victim of crime be negatively impacted by the crimes of others in yet another way. The hypocrisy of the system is truly revealed when you look at how the perpetrators were let off the hook but the victim of crime loses their military career because they had the strength to first report and then eventually ask for help.

Forbidden, Dying for Love Premiered ‘The Girl with the Gold Earring’ on ID: Navy Sailor Zachary Littleton Murders to Hide Adultery (February 24, 2017)

ID Go: A young mom falls for a married military man after a chance meeting at his naval base. -The Girl with the Gold Earring, Forbidden: Dying for Love (S2,E8)

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch all of the Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. Download the ID Go app and binge away. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $2.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict.

Related Links:
The Girl with the Gold Earring | Forbidden: Dying for Love | Investigation Discovery (S2,E8)
The Girl with the Gold Earring | Forbidden: Dying for Love | Investigation Discovery (website)
The Girl with the Gold Earring | Forbidden: Dying for Love | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
Pregnant Samira Watkins Found Dead in Bayou Grande in Florida; Navy Sailor Zachary Littleton Convicted of 1st Degree Murder, Sentenced to Life in Prison (November 3, 2009)

Navy Sailor Andrea Daves Found Dead in Charred Vehicle in California; San Diego County Sheriff’s Department Ruled Cause of Death as Suicide (2017)

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Andrea Daves, US Navy

Navy sailor Andrea Daves’ deceased body was found in a charred vehicle at the end of a cul-de-sac in Lakeside, California on February 22, 2017. She was a mother of two children and on maternity leave at the time of her death. Initially the death was ruled as a homicide but in May 2017, the San Diego County Sheriff’s Homicide Unit ruled the cause of death as suicide due to thermal burns.

“Her mother, Pamela Johnson, told 10 News in February that her daughter loved serving in the Navy and was a good person. Johnson believed her daughter had been killed by someone else.” –East County Magazine

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Fort Hood Army Pfc. Brian Odiorne Died from a Non-Combat Related Incident in Al Anbar Province, Iraq; CID Ruled Death Suicide (2017)

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Pfc. Brian Odiorne, US Army

Pfc. Brian Odiorne, 21, US Army, died from a non-combat related incident in Al Anbar Province, Iraq on February 20, 2017. Pfc. Odiorne’s home of record is listed as Ware, Massachusetts and he joined the Army in October 2015. Pfc. Odiorne was a cannon crewmember supporting Operation Inherent Resolve and was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood, Texas. After an investigation was concluded, the Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) ruled the death a suicide.

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Fort Hood soldier’s death in Iraq ruled a suicide
Why Have So Many Fort Hood Army Soldiers Died Stateside in the Last Year?
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Fort Hood Army Sgt. Sean Callahan Passed Away Unexpectedly in Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Remembered Fondly at Memorial Service (2017)

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Sgt. Sean Callahan, US Army

Army Sgt. Sean Callahan, 31, passed away unexpectedly in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on February 18, 2017. Sgt. Callahan initially entered the Army in March 2008 as an M-1 Armor Crewman but since 2014 was assigned as a ceremony coordinator and flag custodian for the Secretary to the General Staff section, Headquarters Support Company, Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, III Corps, at Fort Hood. According to the obituary, Sgt. Callahan deployed to Iraq in December 2009 as part of Operation New Dawn and was re-deployed in December 2010. The HHB III Corps at Fort Hood held a memorial service for Sgt. Callahan on March 2 2017, and his fellow soldiers remembered him fondly for his positive attitude and great work ethic.

“Sean’s impact on those who knew him simply cannot be measured and the absence of his infectious smile and quick wit will be deeply missed by all.” –Obituary

Related Links:
Obituary: Sean Callahan
Obituary: SGT Sean Callahan
HHB III Corps remembers Callahan for smile, cheer
Army Soldiers at Fort Hood in Texas Are Dying at Alarming Rates Stateside
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas (US Army)
73 Fort Hood Soldiers Died Since January 2016: 4 Insider Attacks & 2 Suicides Overseas; 67 Stateside Deaths Including 34 Alleged Suicides & 1 Unsolved Homicide
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members (2016)
Washington DC Veteran’s Presentation on the Current Status of the Armed Forces at Fort Hood in Texas (2017)
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook