Bradley Stone, US Marine Corps Reserve Veteran, Methodically Killed His Wife & Five In-Laws in Pennsylvania, Then Two Days Later Killed Himself (2014)

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Bradley William Stone, USMC Reserve

On December 16, 2014, Bradley William Stone, a US Marine Corps veteran, killed his wife and five of his in-laws at three different locations throughout Montgomery County in Pennsylvania. After killing them he went on the run and it would be two days before he was found dead in the woods of an apparent suicide. He died from self inflicted knife wounds. The community breathed a sigh of relief after learning that he could no longer harm anyone else.

Patricia Flick, 36: An autopsy conducted found that she suffered gunshot wounds to her right forearm and to her face and a gaping “chop” wound to her head. The coroner determined the cause of death to be gunshot wounds to the arm and head.
Aaron Flick, 39: An autopsy found he suffered gunshot wounds to his right hand and his head and “chopping” wounds to his arm and his head, all of which caused his death.
Nina Flick, 14: An autopsy found she suffered 12 “chop” wounds to her head, which proved fatal, and one “chop” wound to the back of her neck.
Joanne Gilbert, 57: An autopsy found she suffered a gunshot wound to the face and her throat had been slashed; both wounds contributed to her death.
Patricia Hill, 75: An autopsy found she suffered a cutting wound to her left forearm and, the fatal wound, a gunshot wound near her right eye.
Nicole Hill Stone, 33: An autopsy found she suffered a gunshot wound to her hand and two gunshot wounds to her head. The coroner determined the cause of death was multiple gunshot wounds.

Related Links:
Bradley Stone: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Surviving family in shock after Bradley Stone killings
Pennsylvania Shooting Suspect Never Saw Combat, Says Marine Who Served with Him
Bradley Stone: Pennsylvania Shootings Suspect Was ‘Odd’ And ‘Out There’ Fellow Marine Recalls
Relative: Anthony Flick Speaking, Knows Nothing of Shootings
Search continues for accused mass killer Bradley Stone
Police in Pa. search for man suspected of killing ex-wife, 5 former in-laws
Manhunt for ‘Armed and Dangerous’ Suspect in Pennsylvania Shooting Spree
Manhunt for Shooting Spree Suspect Bradley Stone Intensifies in 2nd Day
Bradley Michael Stone at large after Pennsylvania shooting spree killed 6 people
Iraq war veteran suspected in 6 fatal Pennsylvania shootings still at large
Police: Stone found dead
‘Sense Of Relief’ In Pennsylvania As Manhunt Ends
Iraq Vet Who Killed Ex-Wife and Five In-Laws Is Found Dead
PA Shooter Reportedly Found Dead in Woods of Apparent Suicide
Bradley Stone brutalized his seven victims, poisoned himself, authorities reveal
DA: Montgomery County Murder Spree Victims Shot and Cut; Suspect Found Dead
Bradley Stone cleared by Veterans Affairs doctor one week before murders, suicide
Ex-military gunman committed suicide with a sword after he killed six family members and chopped three fingers off teenage boy who survived
Overdose Cited in Death of Man Who Killed 6 in Pennsylvania
Bradley Stone case: Ex-Marine’s suicide ends rampage, manhunt near Philadelphia
Sources: Pennsylvania Murder Spree Suspect Bradley Stone Killed Self with Sword
Pa. killings suspect found dead with self-inflicted knife wounds
Night Of “Horrific Tragedy”: Pennsylvania Rampage That Left 6 Family Members Dead
Suspected Pennsylvania killer of 6 found dead as schools close, security tightens
At vigil, Souderton community remembers mass killing victim Nina Flick
Memorial service held for Flick family

Tracking Military Sex Offenders Prevents Crime

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If someone reports a crime to a police department, even if the person is not prosecuted, there is still a record of the complaint. This is not happening in the military because the Commander does not have access to law enforcement databases. So if the person was accused before in the military, the Commander has no way of knowing. And they are not entering data into the system if they are informed of a complaint. We are losing valuable data if the person is not prosecuted for the crime. The military currently prosecutes less then 10% of complaints.

If information was processed like in the civilian world, we quite possibly could prevent a rape or sexual assault. It could help establish a pattern even if one of the cases didn’t have enough evidence to prosecute. If the military had multiple complaints against one person then they would have a better chance at prosecution.

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