Oxygen Premiered ‘In Defense Of Timothy McVeigh’: Convicted Oklahoma City Bomber Executed by Feds in 2001 for Terrorism (June 25, 2018)

Full Episode: Defense attorneys, Chris Tritico and Stephen Jones, detail their time representing Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in his capital murder trial and their efforts to spare him the death penalty. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Date: April 19, 1995
Victims: Oklahoma City bombing left 168 people dead and hundreds more injured
Offender: Timothy McVeigh, Army veteran
Location: Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Circumstances: Accused Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh was the most hated man in Ok City, he was demonized by the public and in the media, Stephen Jones and Chris Tritico were assigned as his defense attorneys, 25 young children died in the explosion and this weighed heavily on the defense attorneys, there was a lot of pressure defending McVeigh in a capital murder case because he was facing the death penalty, McVeigh was in federal prison in Englewood, Colorado while awaiting trial, TM was coherent and aware of his surroundings and circumstances, he wasn’t the crazy person the attorneys were expecting, he was charged in federal court for a weapons of mass destruction charge and multiple first degree murder charges, TM would not even look at an insanity defense, he initially wanted to plead guilty but the law did not allow it, TM was the boy next door although his parents had a difficult marriage, TM hated bullies because he was bullied in school, after high school, he joined the military, won the Army commendation medal, the bronze star, he was on the General’s staff, he got orders for special operations school but he was out of shape, he quit after three days and this ended his military career, that began the spiral in TM’s life, he started going around the country selling guns at gun shows, he was concerned about the federal government taking over their lives, when the 51 day Waco siege occurred in February 1993, he really became concerned about federal government overreach, TM said he went there and saw the government throw fire incendiary devices into the house and burned it down, he thought the government committed outrageous crimes against the Branch Davidian compound, this act set in motion the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City because that office planned the majority of the siege on Waco, one hour after the bombing, Tim was stopped for not having a license plate, the police officer wrote him a ticket, he found a weapon, TM was placed in jail, meanwhile an investigator found a VIN on a part from the Ryder truck and they traced it back to the rental agency, they created a police sketch based on the description of the man who rented the Ryder truck, someone recognized the sketch at a hotel and it traced back to Timothy McVeigh, he was arrested for the Oklahoma City bombing, President Bill Clinton announced the feds would seek the death penalty, the government had to prove these crimes beyond a reasonable doubt in order to execute him, defense couldn’t use the ‘necessity defense’ because TM murdered children, the government claimed only TM was involved, eventually Army veteran Terry Nichols was arrested for conspiracy in the Ok City bombing, he was in the same platoon in the Army as TM, it added a new person in the conspiracy, the defense used the arrest of Terry Nichols to prove that Terry was involved in the bombing and TM was not but Terry constructed a series of events that gave him an alibi on the day of the bombing, TM’s consistent theme was he did not want anyone else blamed for the bombing, he admitted to how he constructed the bomb and he wanted to take sole responsibility for the act, but the attorneys did not believe that he acted alone, they suspected Terry Nichols and others were involved, TM decided he wanted to go out as the mastermind, then someone stole some documents from one of the attorneys and leaked them to the media, the media printed that TM wanted people to die to pay for the oppression of the government and get their attention, Dallas Morning News broke the story, they learned a defense team member was the one who leaked the documents, he didn’t do it for money, he thought TM’s attorneys would get him off the charges, TM lost trust in his attorneys three weeks before the trial, he refused to meet with the attorneys initially but he agreed to meet with Chris Tritico only, the attorneys were concerned that 6 weeks wasn’t enough time to prepare for a death penalty trial, during trial, one of the witnesses saw someone get out of the Ryder truck and it wasn’t TM, almost immediately after this, the bomb went off, the defense used forensics to show there was no forensic evidence tying TM to the bomb or bombing, their job was to create reasonable doubt, there was an extra leg found and the body had not been identified, this could be the man the witness observed, an existence of another man would lend to the conspiracy theory therefore that’s an argument that TM should not be given the death sentence because he may be needed for future testimony, government presented a good and effective case by calling on survivors of those who died in the bombing, after the trial started, the attorneys got to know TM well, he was a very smart individual, they felt had TM never met Terry Nichols and lost his military career, none of this would have happened, TM had way more depth to him than anyone ever really knew, it was hard to imagine he killed 168 people after the attorneys formed a friendship with him, regardless they were going to work hard to represent TM with vigor, closing arguments was a big deal for these defense attorneys and they felt a lot of pressure because TM’s life was on the line, the jury deliberated for 2 1/2 days, after the guilty verdict, one of TM’s attorneys was asked to help stop the execution because the federal government withheld 100 boxes of evidence, McVeigh was waiting in a federal prison in Indiana, Tim chose to stop the appeals because he did not want to live the life he was living in super max anymore even if they could have reduced his death sentence, TM was silent until the end
Disposition: Timothy McVeigh was found guilty on all 11 federal counts including conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction, use of a weapon of mass destruction by explosive, and all the first degree murder counts; McVeigh was sentenced to death by lethal injection; McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001

Notable Quotes: “To be a criminal defense lawyer, you have to adopt a philosophy that the justice of a society is measured by how it treats it’s worst people, not it’s best.” -Stephen Jones, Timothy McVeigh’s attorney

Source: ‘In Defense of: Timothy McVeigh’ Oxygen

Timothy McVeigh Army

Timothy McVeigh, US Army veteran (Photo: Reddit)

Oxygen:

Timothy McVeigh killed 168 people after bombing a federal building in Oklahoma City. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Defense lawyer Chris Tritico recalls his visit to a federal prison in Colorado that put him face to face with Oklahoma City Bomber Timothy McVeigh. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

A stolen interview with Timothy McVeigh shocks both the public and his own defense team. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

McVeigh’s attorneys remember the gut-wrenching testimonies of those who lost loved ones in the Oklahoma City Bombing. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Chris Tritico’s family remembers the difficulties they faced throughout Timothy McVeigh’s trial. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

“When someone is facing the loss of their life, you have to put everything you have into that.” -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Chris forgot to examine his zipper while cross-examining witnesses. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Stephen Jones reveals a conversation with client Timothy McVeigh that he has never repeated until now. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Chris Tritico does not support crime; he supports the constitution. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

During the Branch Davidian trial Dan Cogdell received a letter of support from Timothy McVeigh, a man who would later be known as the Oklahoma City Bomber. -In Defense Of, Oxygen

In the News:

In one of the most chilling interviews on the broadcast, Ed Bradley talked to McVeigh a year before his execution. -60 Minutes

Oklahoma City Bomber Timothy McVeigh Sentenced to Death. -AP Archive


McVeigh’s father reaction to judge decision. -AP Archive

Interview with McVeigh’s lawyer after last meal. -AP Archive

Documentary:

Timothy McVeigh. We’ve been told so much about him, the Oklahoma City bombing, and what it meant for America. But what if it’s all a lie? -Corbett Report

Related Links:
Timothy James McVeigh #717
Timothy McVeigh | Death Penalty Information Center
Who Was Timothy McVeigh?
Oklahoma City Bombing
Oklahoma City Bombing – FBI
Oklahoma City bombing – HISTORY
Oklahoma City Bombing Fast Facts
The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum
Judge backs Reno’s death penalty call
McVeigh Case Lawyers Argue for Death, Life
Timothy McVeigh refuses to plead for his life
Timothy McVeigh’s death penalty lawyers to speak at Cornell Law School Nov. 14
Who’s Paying Timothy McVeigh’s Lawyers?
McVeigh convicted for Oklahoma City bombing
McVeigh Jury Mulls Execution, A Seldom-Used Federal Penalty
Jurors in Oklahoma City bombing trial sentence Timothy McVeigh to death
McVeigh Ends Appeal of His Death Sentence
McVeigh Condemned to Death
McVeigh sentenced to die for Oklahoma City bombing
6/11/01: Timothy McVeigh Executed
The execution of Timothy McVeigh
Execution of Timothy McVeigh | C-SPAN
Defiant McVeigh dies in silence
Is McVeigh’s execution justified
ACLU Statement on the Execution of Timothy McVeigh
Vast Majority of Americans Think McVeigh Should Be Executed
Victims’ families split by McVeigh execution
Exploiting A Tragedy: Death Penalty Supporters Use The Mcveigh Case
Execution will only make McVeigh’s point
McVeigh Execution Draws Activists From Both Sides of Death Penalty Debate
The Meaning of Timothy McVeigh | Vanity Fair
Inside Death Penalty Decisions: From Timothy McVeigh to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev
Timothy McVeigh and the Myth of Closure
An argument against the Death Penalty
Meeting McVeigh
America Hates Terrorists | The Marshall Project
The Prison Letters of Timothy McVeigh
Timothy McVeigh Lawyer: How Tsarnaev’s Defense Can Save His Life
Execution of a Terrorist: Debates Over Timothy McVeigh’s Death Echo 14 Years Later
15 Years Later, Hearing McVeigh’s Confession
20 years after the Oklahoma City bombing, Timothy McVeigh remains the only terrorist executed by US
Timothy McVeigh juror weighs-in on stress of deciding someone’s fate
The Timothy McVeigh case and its impact on media law
Timothy McVeigh gets the death penalty in 1997 for the Oklahoma City bombing
‘Oklahoma City’ Shows That Timothy McVeigh’s Terrorism Has Contemporary Reach
Out Of The Horror In Oklahoma City, Merrick Garland Forged The Way Forward
Oxygen’s New Crime Series IN DEFENSE OF Premieres Monday, June 25
“In Defense Of”: Oxygen Series Looks at Lawyers Who Defend the Indefensible
Oxygen’s In Defense Of Will Take You Inside Some of the Most Notorious Criminal Cases
Timothy McVeigh’s defense attorney recalls meeting Oklahoma City bomber in new doc: ‘He wasn’t completely nuts’
‘In Defense Of’ Highlights A Totally Different Side To The True Crime Genre
‘In Defense Of’ Sneak Peek: Timothy McVeigh’s Attorney Reveals Hesitation in Taking Oklahoma Bombing Case
A Short History of Timothy McVeigh | Oxygen

YouTube:
March 12, 2000: Timothy McVeigh speaks | 60 Minutes
Oklahoma City Bomber Timothy McVeigh Sentenced to Death
McVeigh’s father reaction to judge decision
Interview with McVeigh’s lawyer after last meal
The Secret Life of Timothy McVeigh
A Short History Of Timothy McVeigh – Very Real | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Preview – Waiting for Craziness (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Preview – A Major Betrayal (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Preview – An Emotional Appeal (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Tough Times (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – A Moment Of Shock (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Courtroom Embarrassment (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Not His First Rodeo (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – A Lifetime Of Law (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Letter From A Future Terrorist (Season 1, Episode 2) | Oxygen
Timothy McVeigh | In Defense Of | Oxygen (S1, E1)
Timothy McVeigh | In Defense Of | Oxygen (preview)
Timothy McVeigh | In Defense Of | Oxygen (website)

American Experience PBS Premiered ‘Oklahoma City’: Timothy McVeigh & Terry Nichols Conspired to Bomb the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (February 7, 2017)

Oklahoma City American Experience PBS

‘Oklahoma City’ American Experience PBS

“On April 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh, a former soldier deeply influenced by the literature and ideas of the radical right, parked a Ryder truck with a five-ton fertilizer bomb in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal building in Oklahoma City. Moments later, 168 people were killed and 675 were injured in the blast. Oklahoma City traces the events — including the deadly encounters between American citizens and law enforcement at Ruby Ridge and Waco — that led McVeigh to commit the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history. With a virulent strain of anti-government anger still with us, the film is both a cautionary tale and an extremely timely warning.” -Oklahoma City, American Experience PBS

Watch ‘Oklahoma City’ here.

American Experience PBS:

Premiering at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Coming to American Experience PBS on February 7, 2017 at 9/8c. -American Experience, PBS

After the Oklahoma City Bombing, Clinton’s ability to reach Americans on a personal level did much to help the nation’s grief. “It’s kind of a throwaway line now, I feel your pain, but he literally could,” says Robert McNeely. “I mean he could take people and just hug them and connect to them in a way and really listen to them.” -American Experience, PBS

Oklahoma City explores how a series of deadly encounters between American citizens and federal law enforcement—including the standoffs at Ruby Ridge and Waco—led to the bombing of the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City in April 1995, the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history. -American Experience, PBS

At the time of the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was home to several government agencies — and a daycare. -American Experience, PBS

During the stand-off between federal agents and the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas in 1993, people gathered on a hill roughly three miles away to see what was happening at the compound. One of those drawn to Waco was a 24-year-old Army veteran named Timothy McVeigh. -American Experience, PBS

Filmmaker Barak Goodman and editor Don Kleszy discuss their newest documentary, “Oklahoma City” and how it led to the creation of another one-hour film about Ruby Ridge. -American Experience, PBS

The 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing was the largest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. A new documentary on the PBS series American Experience takes a fresh look at the events and motivations that led to the attack by Timothy McVeigh, and finds resonance for today. -PBS NewsHour

At the 20th anniversary, we look back at the Oklahoma City bombing. Public television station OETA shares reflections from survivors and victims’ families, and Judy Woodruff talks to former Deputy Attorney General Jamie Gorelick, former Director of Homeland Security of Oklahoma Kerry Pettingill and Barry Grissom, U.S. attorney for the district of Kansas, for lessons learned from the attack. -PBS NewsHour

On April 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh, a former soldier deeply influenced by the literature and ideas of the radical right, parked a Ryder truck with a five-ton fertilizer bomb in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal building in Oklahoma City. Moments later, 168 people were killed and 675 were injured in the blast. OKLAHOMA CITY traces the events — including the deadly encounters between American citizens and law enforcement at Ruby Ridge and Waco — that led McVeigh to commit the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history. With a virulent strain of anti-government anger still with us, the film is both a cautionary tale and an extremely timely warning. -YouTube Movies

Related Links:
Oklahoma City Bombing
Oklahoma City Bombing – FBI
Oklahoma City bombing – HISTORY
Oklahoma City Bombing Fast Facts
The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum
Oklahoma City National Memorial (U.S. National Park Service)
Oklahoma City Bombing: 168 People Died in an Act of Domestic Terrorism at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (April 19, 1995)
Oxygen Premiered ‘In Defense Of Timothy McVeigh’: Convicted Oklahoma City Bomber Executed by Feds in 2001 for Terrorism (June 25, 2018)
Film Review: ‘Oklahoma City’ | Variety
From the ashes: Documentarian revisits horrific bombing in ‘Oklahoma City’
Oklahoma City PBS Documentary Explores America’s Tradition of Anti-Government Terrorism
Review: ‘Oklahoma City’ Recalls a Chilling Attack With Lessons for Today
New film links McVeigh to far right before bombing in OKC
Movie review: ‘Oklahoma City’ bombing documentary serves as timely cautionary tale
Oklahoma City: A Cautionary Tale of Hate in America | American Experience | PBS

YouTube:
Oklahoma City Teaser | American Experience | PBS
Oklahoma City | Promo | American Experience | PBS
Oklahoma City Official Trailer 1 (2017) – Documentary
American Experience | The Oklahoma City Bombing | PBS
Chapter 1 | Oklahoma City | PBS
The Murrah Building | Oklahoma City | American Experience | PBS
Timothy McVeigh at Waco | Oklahoma City | American Experience | PBS
Interview: Barak Goodman & Don Kleszy | Oklahoma City & Ruby Ridge
Tracing the roots of the America’s biggest domestic terror attack | PBS NewsHour
‘There was no playbook’ for handling the Oklahoma City bombing | PBS NewsHour
American Experience: Oklahoma City | PBS | YouTube Movies
Clinton | American Experience | PBS

Web of Lies Premiered ‘People You May Know’ on Investigation Discovery: Convicted Rapist Uses Fake Profile to Catfish Lorianna Parker on Social Media (February 7, 2017)

Single mom Lorianna Parker is excited when she meets popular good-looking Corey Davis online, and filled with hope as their friendship blossoms. But when she goes to meet him in the flesh, her dream date turns into a living nightmare. -People You May Know, Web of Lies (S4,E1)

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch all of the Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. Download the ID Go app and binge away. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $2.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict.

Related Links:
People You May Know | Web of Lies | Investigation Discovery (S4,E1)
People You May Know | Web of Lies | Investigation Discovery (website)
People You May Know | Web of Lies | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
Ashley Pullen Sentenced to Life in Prison in Oklahoma for Multiple Rapes with Narcotic Agent; Dishonorably Discharged from the Army for Sexual Assault (February 5, 2015)

Ashley Pullen Sentenced to Life in Prison in Oklahoma for Multiple Rapes with Narcotic Agent; Dishonorably Discharged from the Army for Sexual Assault (February 5, 2015)

54d413bc4af75.image

Ashley Pullen, US Army Veteran

Lorianna Parker dated her partner Rodney for four years before they became parents on April 5, 2012 in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Rodney was described as genuine; he had a heart of gold and treated Lorianna like a princess. Rodney’s job kept him on the road a lot and tragically on April 13, 2012, nine days after their first child was born, Rodney died in a car accident. Lorianna was devastated by the news his mother shared that day because Rodney was her life, Rodney was the father of her son. About a month later, Lorianna went back to work to support her family and eventually enrolled in school at the community college. It would be two years after Rodney’s death that she finally decided to date again. She used a social media dating app to begin the dating process and immediately recognized she was comparing everyone to Rodney.

Then one day Corey Davis showed up on Facebook. She noticed they had mutual friends and she thought he was super hot. She thought about friend requesting him but hoped he would friend request her. The next day Corey friend requested her. She couldn’t believe this hot guy was interested in her; he said he was a model, and looked like one too. He also mentioned that he noticed her at the community college; Lorianna was flattered that he noticed her and pursued her. The two chatted via text all day, every day from there on out. After two and a half weeks, Corey invited her to hang out with his friends. The first date didn’t pan out because Lorianna got sick. After canceling, Corey’s response was anger and she didn’t hear from him again until the next day. They ‘made up’ and everything was okay.

Screen Shot 2017-06-08 at 10.33.00 AM

“Corey Davis” on Facebook

This time Corey invited Lorianna to hang out at his apartment in North Tulsa. He told her he left the apartment to pick up some food but suggested Lorianna go to his apartment and wait for him, his roommate Ashley and his son would be there to greet her. Lorianna finally found his apartment and Ashley Pullen and his five year old son Daniel were outside waiting for her. Ashley graciously invited Lorianna up to the apartment to wait until Corey came home. Lorianna felt safe because Ashley was a wonderful father. While they were chatting, Ashley shared that Daniels’s mom took off and abandoned him; he was a single dad. Then Lorianna got a text from Corey informing her he was going to be late (he was playing video games with his friends); he told her to relax and have a drink while she was waiting. Ashley offered Lorianna a vodka shot and then a second shot. By midnight, Lorianna felt like her chest was heavy and she could have slept for days.

When Lorianna woke up the first time, she was on a mattress on the floor and a man was on top of her. She was afraid to open her eyes and let him know that she was awake because she feared he would kill her. Lorianna drifted back into unconsciousness and what happened next was a blur. When she came to the second time, she was wearing someone else’s basketball shorts with no shirt. Her first instinct was to flee from the situation. She jumped up, got dressed, and gathered her belongings. In the meantime, Ashley awoke and before she could leave, he told her he had a great night and wanted to see her again. Lorianna was confused and left the apartment, she was thinking, “What just happened between you and I?’ There was so much confusion and Lorianna struggled to remember what happened. She wanted to believe that what she thought happened didn’t happen. Meanwhile, Ashley continued to text her and acted as if they both had a great time.

The next day, Lorianna got bombarded with text messages from both Ashley and Corey right in to the evening. Ashley texted Lorianna and told her Corey never showed up because he got pulled over for speeding and was thrown in jail for some outstanding tickets and warrants. Ashley also tried to make her believe that she came onto him. Adding to the confusion, she felt like he was trying to say everything was her fault. She decided she was done with him, told him to leave her alone, and blocked him on Facebook. Then Corey contacted her upset that she had sex with Ashley. He claimed he showed up to the apartment that night, saw them in bed, and left because he was angry. Corey was calling her names, including slut and whore, and belittling her because she slept with his roommate. Lorianna told Corey she was done with him to and to leave her alone.

Two weeks earlier, a young woman made a report of sexual assault to the Tulsa Police Department. She too met Corey Davis on Facebook and eventually went to his apartment where Ashley Pullen and his son were there to greet her. She too felt like she was drugged and sexually assaulted but could not identify who raped her. She was asked to get a sexual assault examination to determine if there was any DNA, but the victim reported two days after the assault so police were unable to obtain a DNA profile to match to a suspect. Meanwhile two more women reported the same eerily similar circumstances. Both alleged Ashley Pullen gave them two shots and after the second shot, they blacked out but they knew they were sexually assaulted. Unfortunately because they were most likely drugged, these three victims couldn’t positively identify who raped them. Then a fourth victim came forward who remembered the sexual assault and she could positively identify Ashley Pullen. As a result, Pullen was arrested. After the arrest, police learned Ashley Pullen was dishonorably discharged from the Army after he was convicted in 2002 and 2003 for assaulting two women at Fort Carson.

The Tulsa Police Department reached out to the media in an attempt to find out if there were more victims. After Lorianna learned of Ashley Pullen’s arrest, she contacted the police. She thought her social media messages would be helpful to the investigation. The police made copies of the messages and then Lorianna gave a statement. Lorianna remembered waking up with someone on top of her; she knew it was Ashley Pullen because she woke up next to him listening to his drivel about how they had a great time. As a result, she was the second woman to positively identify Ashley Pullen as the man who drugged and raped her. Both victims who could positively identify Ashley told police they had two shots with him then felt tired. It did not make sense. Why do I feel woozy, why is my head spinning, and why did I black out after only two shots? The police recognized the modus operandi of this serial rapist who used the second shot to drug his victims in an effort to incapacitate them. The police searched Ashley’s apartment for any traces of date rape drugs.

Investigators did in fact find unknown substances in Ashley Pullen’s home and forensic tests confirmed the unknown substances were GHB, which is a common date rape drug and usually given to those with sleep disorders. Unfortunately, this particular drug can be manufactured at home with common chemicals. GHB is clear and odorless and within 10 minutes one will feel the effects; all the victims noted they felt dizzy and unexplainably tired after the second shot they consumed. And like most, these victims assumed they overindulged, and that is was causes the confusion. Investigators explained that GBH metabolizes out of the system in 10 hours which makes it the perfect drug for a rapist. By the time the victim realizes what happened to them, it’s too late. GHB also makes the brain cease from properly forming memory which is identical to a blackout; the drug shuts down the brain. Victims have half memories at best. The Tulsa Police Department charged Ashley Pullen with first degree rape by narcotic agent.

Next investigators wanted to know who Corey Davis was? They wanted to know if he helped facilitate the crimes, if he himself committed similar crimes, or if he was a victim too. After some digging, the police deduced that ‘Corey Davis’ was a fictitious, manufactured profile on Facebook. Detectives could find no trace of Corey Davis anywhere. Corey Davis was a complete fabrication invented on a fake Facebook profile by Ashley Pullen. He created the fake profile using a ‘hot model’ to lure unsuspecting women to his home after ‘Corey’ asked them out on a date. Ashley created a person, a life, and he used Corey Davis to trick others; he friend requested females as Corey Davis the hot model to groom them and build trust. The victims reported Corey Davis was a nice guy, very flattering, and made them feel good about themselves. When Lorianna learned that Corey Davis was actually Ashley Pullen, she was felt sick to her stomach that she had been fooled by Ashley Pullen again.

According to investigators, Ashley Pullin had absolutely zero remorse. He was described as ‘evil to the core and a ruthless manipulator’. Ashley used his fake Facebook profile Corey Davis the model to reel in his victims. Then he used his fail safe strategy, his five year old son, to help make his future victims safe when they arrived to Corey’s home. None of women who arrived at Corey’s apartment thought they would be raped by someone with a five year old present. They thought Ashley was a great dad and as a result wouldn’t hurt anyone. Ashley told all of his victims that his son’s mother abandoned him when in fact he kidnapped the child from his mother three years prior to his string of sexual assaults. Ashley used his own child to further his deceit in an elaborate scheme to drug and rape unsuspecting women. On February 5, 2015, Ashley Pullen was convicted of first degree rape by narcotic agent. Pullen was sentenced to life in prison and it is not eligible for parole until 2060; he will be 77 years.

Tulsa Police Department say “before you meet someone in person, Google them or do a court records search, and even then, be careful. Meet in a public place somewhere, not just public, but public and crowded. If you do meet someone, you shouldn’t accept a drink from them because it’s easy to slip something in it.”

Source: People You May Know, Web of Lies, Investigation Discovery

Investigation Discovery:

Single mom Lorianna Parker is excited when she meets popular good-looking Corey Davis online, and filled with hope as their friendship blossoms. But when she goes to meet him in the flesh, her dream date turns into a living nightmare. -People You May Know, Web of Lies (S4,E1)

Related Links:
Accused rapist used stolen identity to lure victims
Suspect Accused of Using Facebook to Rape his Victims
Tulsa Man Accused of Using Facebook to Lure Women into Apartment
Police Arrest Tulsa Man In Sexual Assault Of Three Women
Tulsa Serial Rape Suspect Using Fake Facebook Page Is Arrested
Tulsa Jury Recommends Life Sentence For ‘Facebook Rapist’
Tulsa man gets life sentence after using Facebook to lure rape victim
Tulsa man convicted of rape lured possible victims with fake Facebook profile
Tulsa County prosecutors discuss Facebook rape case
State Court Affirms Tulsa Man’s Rape Conviction, Life Sentence
State of Oklahoma v. Ashley Reed Pullen (2015)
Ashley Pullen vs. State of Oklahoma (2016)
People You May Know | Web of Lies | Investigation Discovery (S4,E1)
People You May Know | Web of Lies | Investigation Discovery (website)
People You May Know | Web of Lies | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)

Link

US Army SealFort Sill soldier convicted of sexual misconduct with child

LAWTON — A military judge has found a Fort Sill soldier guilty of sexual offenses against a child, the fifth soldier from the Army post to be convicted of sexual misconduct with a child since July 2012. Sgt. Kristoffer R. Lenning was sentenced to 43 years confinement, reduction to the lowest rank and a dishonorable discharge.

The fort’s leaders have previously declined to comment on the number of such cases. However, in an emailed response Monday, a Fort Sill spokesman said “one assault is too many.”

Read more here.

August: U.S. Department of Defense Casualties Report (2011)

Department of Defense

08/29/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Douglas Green, 23, Afghanistan, Fort Wainwright, Alaska

08/28/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Michael Roberts, 23, Afghanistan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

08/27/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Jesse Dietrich, 20, Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York

08/27/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Brandon Mullins, 21, Afghanistan, Fort Wainwright, Alaska

08/26/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Andrew Tobin, 24, Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York

08/24/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Timothy Steele, 25, Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York

08/20/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Douglas Cordo, 20, Afghanistan, Fort Wainwright, Alaska

08/19/2011:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Travis Nelson, 19, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

08/17/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Joshua Seals, 21, NCD, Afghanistan, Oklahoma Army National Guard

08/17/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Dennis Jensen, 21, NCD, Afghanistan, South Dakota Army National Guard

08/17/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Damon Leehan, 30, Afghanistan, Oklahoma Army National Guard

08/16/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Matthew Harmon, 29, and Joseph VanDreumel, 32, Afghanistan, Grafenwoehr, Germany

08/16/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Charles Price III, Afghanistan, Fort Carson, Colorado

08/15/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Joe Cunningham, 27, NCD, Afghanistan, Oklahoma Army National Guard

08/13/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Edward Frank II, 26, Jameel Freeman, 26, Patrick Lay II, 21, Jordan Morris, 23, and Rueben Lopez, 27, Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York

08/13/2011:  DOD Identifies Navy Casualty: Riley Gallinger-Long, 19, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

08/11/2011:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Nicholas Ott, 23, Afghanistan, Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii

08/11/2011:  DOD Identifies 20 US Navy Service Members Killed In CH-47 Crash: Jonas Kelsall, 29, Louis Langlais, 44, Thomas Ratzlaff, 34, Kraig Vickers, 36, Brian Bill, 31, John Faas, 31, Kevin Houston, 35, Matthew Mason, 37, Stephen Mills, 35, Nicholas Hull, 30, Robert Reeves, 32, Heath Robinson, 34, Darrik Benson, 28, Christopher Campbell, 36, Jared Day, 28, John Douangdara, 26, Michael Strange, 25, Jon Tumilson, 35, Aaron Vaughn, 30, and Jason Workman, 32, NCDs, Afghanistan, East Coast-based Naval Special Warfare

08/11/2011:  DOD Identifies 2 US Navy Service Members Killed In CH-47 Crash: Jesse Pittman, 27, and Nicholas Spehar, 24, NCDs, Afghanistan, West Coast-based Naval Special Warfare

08/11/2011:  DOD Identifies 5 US Army Service Members Killed In CH-47 Crash: David Carter, 47, Bryan Nichols, 31, Patrick Hamburger, 30, Alexander Bennett, 24, and Spencer Duncan, 21, NCDs, Afghanistan, Army General Support Aviation Battalion

08/11/2011:  DOD Identifies 3 US Air Force Service Members Killed In CH-47 Crash: John Brown, 33, Andrew Harvell, 26, and Daniel Zerbe, 28, NCDs, Afghanistan, Pope Field, North Carolina

08/09/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Alessandro Plutino, 28, Afghanistan, Hunter Army Airfield, Georgia

08/09/2011:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualties: Adan Gonzales Jr, 28, and Joshua Robinson, 29, Afghanistan, Camp Pendleton, California

08/08/2011:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Daniel Patron, 26, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

08/08/2011:  Soldier Missing in Action from WWII Identified: William F. Stehlin, US Army

08/06/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Mark Downer, 23, Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York

08/06/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Jinsu Lee, 34, NCD, Afghanistan, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

08/06/2011:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Daniel Gurr, 21, Afghanistan, Okinawa, Japan

08/05/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Anthony Del Mar Peterson, 24, Afghanistan, Oklahoma Army National Guard

08/05/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Waid Ramsey, 41, Afghanistan, Army Special Operations Command

08/05/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Cody Baker, 19, and Gil Morales Del Valle, 21, Afghanistan, Fort Polk, Louisiana

08/05/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Barun Rai, 24, NCD, Afghanistan, Bamberg, Germany

08/03/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Kirk Owen, 37, Afganistan, Oklahoma Army National Guard

08/03/2011:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualties: Patrick Dolphin, 29, Dennis Kancler, 26, and Christopher Wrinkle, 29, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

08/02/2011:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Leon Lucas Jr, 32, Afghanistan, Twentynine Palms, California

08/02/2011:  Soldier Missing from Vietnam War Identified: George A. Howes, US Army

08/02/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Brice Scott, 22, Afghanistan, Fort Riley, Kansas

08/01/2011:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: William GrossPaniagua, 28, Afghanistan, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

Related Links:
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2002)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2003)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2004)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2005)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2006)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2007)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2008)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2009)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2010)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2012)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2013)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2014)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2015)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2016)
August: Department of Defense Casualties Report (2017)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)