Oxygen Premiered ‘In Defense Of Timothy McVeigh’: Convicted Oklahoma City Bomber Executed by Feds in 2001 for Terrorism (June 25, 2018)

Full Episode: Defense attorneys, Chris Tritico and Stephen Jones, detail their time representing Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in his capital murder trial and their efforts to spare him the death penalty. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Date: April 19, 1995
Victims: Oklahoma City bombing left 168 people dead and hundreds more injured
Offender: Timothy McVeigh, Army veteran
Location: Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Circumstances: Accused Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh was the most hated man in Ok City, he was demonized by the public and in the media, Stephen Jones and Chris Tritico were assigned as his defense attorneys, 25 young children died in the explosion and this weighed heavily on the defense attorneys, there was a lot of pressure defending McVeigh in a capital murder case because he was facing the death penalty, McVeigh was in federal prison in Englewood, Colorado while awaiting trial, TM was coherent and aware of his surroundings and circumstances, he wasn’t the crazy person the attorneys were expecting, he was charged in federal court for a weapons of mass destruction charge and multiple first degree murder charges, TM would not even look at an insanity defense, he initially wanted to plead guilty but the law did not allow it, TM was the boy next door although his parents had a difficult marriage, TM hated bullies because he was bullied in school, after high school, he joined the military, won the Army commendation medal, the bronze star, he was on the General’s staff, he got orders for special operations school but he was out of shape, he quit after three days and this ended his military career, that began the spiral in TM’s life, he started going around the country selling guns at gun shows, he was concerned about the federal government taking over their lives, when the 51 day Waco siege occurred in February 1993, he really became concerned about federal government overreach, TM said he went there and saw the government throw fire incendiary devices into the house and burned it down, he thought the government committed outrageous crimes against the Branch Davidian compound, this act set in motion the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City because that office planned the majority of the siege on Waco, one hour after the bombing, Tim was stopped for not having a license plate, the police officer wrote him a ticket, he found a weapon, TM was placed in jail, meanwhile an investigator found a VIN on a part from the Ryder truck and they traced it back to the rental agency, they created a police sketch based on the description of the man who rented the Ryder truck, someone recognized the sketch at a hotel and it traced back to Timothy McVeigh, he was arrested for the Oklahoma City bombing, President Bill Clinton announced the feds would seek the death penalty, the government had to prove these crimes beyond a reasonable doubt in order to execute him, defense couldn’t use the ‘necessity defense’ because TM murdered children, the government claimed only TM was involved, eventually Army veteran Terry Nichols was arrested for conspiracy in the Ok City bombing, he was in the same platoon in the Army as TM, it added a new person in the conspiracy, the defense used the arrest of Terry Nichols to prove that Terry was involved in the bombing and TM was not but Terry constructed a series of events that gave him an alibi on the day of the bombing, TM’s consistent theme was he did not want anyone else blamed for the bombing, he admitted to how he constructed the bomb and he wanted to take sole responsibility for the act, but the attorneys did not believe that he acted alone, they suspected Terry Nichols and others were involved, TM decided he wanted to go out as the mastermind, then someone stole some documents from one of the attorneys and leaked them to the media, the media printed that TM wanted people to die to pay for the oppression of the government and get their attention, Dallas Morning News broke the story, they learned a defense team member was the one who leaked the documents, he didn’t do it for money, he thought TM’s attorneys would get him off the charges, TM lost trust in his attorneys three weeks before the trial, he refused to meet with the attorneys initially but he agreed to meet with Chris Tritico only, the attorneys were concerned that 6 weeks wasn’t enough time to prepare for a death penalty trial, during trial, one of the witnesses saw someone get out of the Ryder truck and it wasn’t TM, almost immediately after this, the bomb went off, the defense used forensics to show there was no forensic evidence tying TM to the bomb or bombing, their job was to create reasonable doubt, there was an extra leg found and the body had not been identified, this could be the man the witness observed, an existence of another man would lend to the conspiracy theory therefore that’s an argument that TM should not be given the death sentence because he may be needed for future testimony, government presented a good and effective case by calling on survivors of those who died in the bombing, after the trial started, the attorneys got to know TM well, he was a very smart individual, they felt had TM never met Terry Nichols and lost his military career, none of this would have happened, TM had way more depth to him than anyone ever really knew, it was hard to imagine he killed 168 people after the attorneys formed a friendship with him, regardless they were going to work hard to represent TM with vigor, closing arguments was a big deal for these defense attorneys and they felt a lot of pressure because TM’s life was on the line, the jury deliberated for 2 1/2 days, after the guilty verdict, one of TM’s attorneys was asked to help stop the execution because the federal government withheld 100 boxes of evidence, McVeigh was waiting in a federal prison in Indiana, Tim chose to stop the appeals because he did not want to live the life he was living in super max anymore even if they could have reduced his death sentence, TM was silent until the end
Disposition: Timothy McVeigh was found guilty on all 11 federal counts including conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction, use of a weapon of mass destruction by explosive, and all the first degree murder counts; McVeigh was sentenced to death by lethal injection; McVeigh was executed on June 11, 2001

Notable Quotes: “To be a criminal defense lawyer, you have to adopt a philosophy that the justice of a society is measured by how it treats it’s worst people, not it’s best.” -Stephen Jones, Timothy McVeigh’s attorney

Source: ‘In Defense of: Timothy McVeigh’ Oxygen

Timothy McVeigh Army

Timothy McVeigh, US Army veteran (Photo: Reddit)

Oxygen:

Timothy McVeigh killed 168 people after bombing a federal building in Oklahoma City. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Defense lawyer Chris Tritico recalls his visit to a federal prison in Colorado that put him face to face with Oklahoma City Bomber Timothy McVeigh. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

A stolen interview with Timothy McVeigh shocks both the public and his own defense team. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

McVeigh’s attorneys remember the gut-wrenching testimonies of those who lost loved ones in the Oklahoma City Bombing. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Chris Tritico’s family remembers the difficulties they faced throughout Timothy McVeigh’s trial. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

“When someone is facing the loss of their life, you have to put everything you have into that.” -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Chris forgot to examine his zipper while cross-examining witnesses. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Stephen Jones reveals a conversation with client Timothy McVeigh that he has never repeated until now. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

Chris Tritico does not support crime; he supports the constitution. -In Defense Of, Oxygen (S1, E1)

During the Branch Davidian trial Dan Cogdell received a letter of support from Timothy McVeigh, a man who would later be known as the Oklahoma City Bomber. -In Defense Of, Oxygen

In the News:

In one of the most chilling interviews on the broadcast, Ed Bradley talked to McVeigh a year before his execution. -60 Minutes

Oklahoma City Bomber Timothy McVeigh Sentenced to Death. -AP Archive


McVeigh’s father reaction to judge decision. -AP Archive

Interview with McVeigh’s lawyer after last meal. -AP Archive

Documentary:

Timothy McVeigh. We’ve been told so much about him, the Oklahoma City bombing, and what it meant for America. But what if it’s all a lie? -Corbett Report

Related Links:
Timothy James McVeigh #717
Timothy McVeigh | Death Penalty Information Center
Who Was Timothy McVeigh?
Oklahoma City Bombing
Oklahoma City Bombing – FBI
Oklahoma City bombing – HISTORY
Oklahoma City Bombing Fast Facts
The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum
Judge backs Reno’s death penalty call
McVeigh Case Lawyers Argue for Death, Life
Timothy McVeigh refuses to plead for his life
Timothy McVeigh’s death penalty lawyers to speak at Cornell Law School Nov. 14
Who’s Paying Timothy McVeigh’s Lawyers?
McVeigh convicted for Oklahoma City bombing
McVeigh Jury Mulls Execution, A Seldom-Used Federal Penalty
Jurors in Oklahoma City bombing trial sentence Timothy McVeigh to death
McVeigh Ends Appeal of His Death Sentence
McVeigh Condemned to Death
McVeigh sentenced to die for Oklahoma City bombing
6/11/01: Timothy McVeigh Executed
The execution of Timothy McVeigh
Execution of Timothy McVeigh | C-SPAN
Defiant McVeigh dies in silence
Is McVeigh’s execution justified
ACLU Statement on the Execution of Timothy McVeigh
Vast Majority of Americans Think McVeigh Should Be Executed
Victims’ families split by McVeigh execution
Exploiting A Tragedy: Death Penalty Supporters Use The Mcveigh Case
Execution will only make McVeigh’s point
McVeigh Execution Draws Activists From Both Sides of Death Penalty Debate
The Meaning of Timothy McVeigh | Vanity Fair
Inside Death Penalty Decisions: From Timothy McVeigh to Dzhokhar Tsarnaev
Timothy McVeigh and the Myth of Closure
An argument against the Death Penalty
Meeting McVeigh
America Hates Terrorists | The Marshall Project
The Prison Letters of Timothy McVeigh
Timothy McVeigh Lawyer: How Tsarnaev’s Defense Can Save His Life
Execution of a Terrorist: Debates Over Timothy McVeigh’s Death Echo 14 Years Later
15 Years Later, Hearing McVeigh’s Confession
20 years after the Oklahoma City bombing, Timothy McVeigh remains the only terrorist executed by US
Timothy McVeigh juror weighs-in on stress of deciding someone’s fate
The Timothy McVeigh case and its impact on media law
Timothy McVeigh gets the death penalty in 1997 for the Oklahoma City bombing
‘Oklahoma City’ Shows That Timothy McVeigh’s Terrorism Has Contemporary Reach
Out Of The Horror In Oklahoma City, Merrick Garland Forged The Way Forward
Oxygen’s New Crime Series IN DEFENSE OF Premieres Monday, June 25
“In Defense Of”: Oxygen Series Looks at Lawyers Who Defend the Indefensible
Oxygen’s In Defense Of Will Take You Inside Some of the Most Notorious Criminal Cases
Timothy McVeigh’s defense attorney recalls meeting Oklahoma City bomber in new doc: ‘He wasn’t completely nuts’
‘In Defense Of’ Highlights A Totally Different Side To The True Crime Genre
‘In Defense Of’ Sneak Peek: Timothy McVeigh’s Attorney Reveals Hesitation in Taking Oklahoma Bombing Case
A Short History of Timothy McVeigh | Oxygen

YouTube:
March 12, 2000: Timothy McVeigh speaks | 60 Minutes
Oklahoma City Bomber Timothy McVeigh Sentenced to Death
McVeigh’s father reaction to judge decision
Interview with McVeigh’s lawyer after last meal
The Secret Life of Timothy McVeigh
A Short History Of Timothy McVeigh – Very Real | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Preview – Waiting for Craziness (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Preview – A Major Betrayal (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Preview – An Emotional Appeal (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Tough Times (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – A Moment Of Shock (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Courtroom Embarrassment (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Not His First Rodeo (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – A Lifetime Of Law (Season 1, Episode 1) | Oxygen
In Defense Of: Bonus Clip – Letter From A Future Terrorist (Season 1, Episode 2) | Oxygen
Timothy McVeigh | In Defense Of | Oxygen (S1, E1)
Timothy McVeigh | In Defense Of | Oxygen (preview)
Timothy McVeigh | In Defense Of | Oxygen (website)

Snapped Notorious Premiered ‘Prescription for Death’ on Oxygen: Kristen Gilbert Serving Life in Prison for Murdering Four VA Patients in Massachusetts (May 13, 2018)

Police believe nurse Kristen Gilbert may have committed up to 60 murders at a hospital in Massachusetts. Some say an affair drove Gilbert to murder while others think her narcissism caused the death of these innocent patients. -Prescription for Death, Snapped Notorious, Oxygen (S23, E17)

Dates: March 1989-February 1996
Date of Arrest: July 11, 1996
Offender: Kristen Gilbert, 32, Department of Veterans Affairs Nurse
Location: Department of Veterans Affairs, Northampton, Massachusetts
Homicide Victims: Stanley Jagodowski, 66, Army veteran (August 21, 1995); Henry Hudon, 35, Air Force veteran (December 8, 1995); Kenneth Cutting, 41, Army veteran (February 2, 1996); Edward Skwira, 69, WWII Army veteran (February 15, 1996)
Circumstances: The number of deaths increased dramatically at the Northampton VA Medical Center in 1995, a co-worker was surprised by all the codes at the hospital, when a patient codes, it means the heart stopped, some can survive codes but the patients at the VA died, the deaths didn’t make sense, February 29, 1996, the police received a call from the VA Center, they reported that the deaths doubled at the medical center, nurses came forward with concerns that one of their co-workers was killing patients and they thought they were dealing with a serial killer, one common denominator was the presence of Kristen Gilbert, KG came from ordinary family, she was intelligent, a great student, she had a bubbly personality, was sophisticated and had a lot of friends, she was addicted to getting attention, she needed more and more, she had a constant need to be the center of things, she had narcissistic personality disorder, she manipulated others to get her way, she threatened to kill herself if she didn’t get the attention she wanted from boyfriends, she also had Borderline Personality Disorder, her obsession was thrill and attention, she graduated from nursing school in 1988 and was hired at the VA Medical Center in Northampton the following year, she got great reviews from her bosses, she went undetected because she volunteered for extra work, she wore a mask of normality but underneath she was an evil person, Kristen met her future husband in New Hampshire, they were married and had two children, she had a volatile relationship with her husband, chased him around with a knife, but her husband wanted to hold the marriage together for the children, then Kristen had an affair with a security guard at the VA and as a result Kristen’s marriage ended, then patients started coding and the doctors were not able to save them, one of them was Stanley Jagodowski, the codes and death continued, a second suspicious death occurred, a young veteran was admitted for the flu, he coded three times and his heart gave out the third time, Kenneth Cutting was admitted for sepsis, later that night Kenneth coded and died of cardiac arrest, it appeared he died for no apparent reason, authorities learned KG injected patients with epinephrine to initiate cardiac arrest, they would code and then she was one of the people who rushed to the scene to deal with the crisis, as a result she got a lot of attention from her security guard boyfriend, they worked together to save the patients lives, she put patients into crisis to get attention from the security guard, she developed a callous attitude about the patients, authorities learned her boyfriend wasn’t involved, he was an innocent bystander, the nurses thought she had bad luck because patients died when she was around, she was known as the Angel of Death, Edward Skwira was the fourth suspicious death, he was admitted for alcoholism, that night he died from cardiac arrest and this should not have happened, her fellow nurses became suspicious, the nurses started looking for evidence and they found used bottles of epinephrine, record keeping allowed her to dip into the epinephrine supply with no detection, February 29, 1996, the cops got a call from the VA Medical Center, the nurses believed Kristen was killing patients, death followed Kristen from shift to shift to shift, the security guard ended the relationship when he began to suspect Kristen too, she took the break up badly and began panicking, when backed in a corner, her type turns to the extreme, authorities put her under surveillance, in September 1996, the VA received a bomb threat and the patients were evacuated, it turned out to be a bogus bomb threat, the police were watching Kristen and the same phone she used was traced to the VA bomb threat, after the bomb threat, she went home and the police got a warrant, the police found the jacket she had on when she placed the phone calls, she had operating directions on how to change your voice in her pocket, they also found a talk boy which changes the sound of your voice, this was the instrument most likely used to change her voice on the bomb threat call, they found medical books, computer records, journals, a page dog eared at epinephrine, but the police needed something more concrete to make their case, meanwhile she was held accountable for the bomb threat and received a 15 month sentence, when serving the sentence, there was a suicide attempt, she was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, they use whatever they need to keep drawing attention to themselves, they are always the victim to keep the focus on themselves, while she was in jail, the police continued the investigation, they needed to prove what she did so they could win at trial, authorities exhumed some of the patients who died under Kristen’s care to find evidence of epinephrine in their system, the families were cooperative and thankful the police were investigating, the autopsies found much higher amounts of epinephrine than should be there, the patient’s hearts were good, and the police finally had their proof, the prosecution moved forward with homicide charges, some claimed she did it for love, her desire to get the attention of her boyfriend, she was tried in a federal capital felony case and was eligible for the death penalty, Kristen was cold during the entire trial, Kristen is a classic female serial killer, she has what they call intrinsic locus, it’s all about her, she is the number one priority in her own life and she’s self absorbed, she played the hero so she could save the day all in an effort to garner attention, if people have to die, its okay with her, she is a master of deceit, she is one of the most dangerous and evil
Disposition: In 2001, Kristen Gilbert was found guilty of four counts of murder and three counts of attempted murder; the jury sentenced KG to life in prison as opposed to the death penalty; law enforcement officials believe she could be responsible for killing up to 60 patients; Gilbert appealed the decision but dropped it once she realized prosecutors could pursue the death penalty in a new trial

Notable Quotes: “Healthcare serial killers are the most unlikely villains. They prey on vulnerable victims and use medicine as their murder weapons.” -Oxygen

Source: Kristen Gilbert, Snapped Notorious, Oxygen

Screen Shot 2018-05-17 at 4.39.38 PM

Kristen Gilbert

Deadly Women:

Full Episode: Poison is an ancient weapon, convenient, non-confrontational and secretive. Women are five times more likely to use it than men. The poisoner is a particularly sinister killer able to sit back and watch someone die. -Poisonous Women, Deadly Women

Related Links:
Kristen Gilbert – Wikipedia
Kristen Gilbert | Murderpedia
Former nurse charged in 3 veterans’s deaths
Former Nurse on Trial in Patients’ Deaths
Kristen Heather Gilbert | Medical Bag
6 Facts about Female Serial Killer Kristen Gilbert
10 Nurses That Are Serial Killers
Kristen Gilbert – The Angel of Death
Kristen Gilbert – The Angel of Death – Serial Killing Nurse
Worst Female Serial Killers | Documentary | Female Killers
Caregiver or killer? | Boston Globe
She liked to play the star | Boston Globe
Death The Common Denominator
Ex-va Nurse Indicted In 3 Suspected Murders
Trial Begins Today for Nurse Accused of Killing Veterans
Nurse Killed 4 Patients for Thrill, Prosecutor Says
Former Nurse on Trial in Patients’ Deaths
Nurse sentenced to life in VA deaths
Murderous Nurse Escapes Death Penalty
Serial Killer Nurse Kristen Gilbert
When Serial Killers Strike: The Angel of Death on Ward C
Serial Killer Nurse Who Liked ‘Thrill’ of Emergencies Murdered Patients to Impress Boyfriend
Oxygen Media Pulls Curtain Back On Two Famous Serial Killers On Snapped Notorious: Prescription for Death
Judge’s fictional account gives inside view of death penalty trial
Doctors and Nurses Who Kill: Genene Jones, Charles Cullen and More Who Preyed on Their Patients and Others
17 Serial Killer Nurses Who Murdered Their Patients
10 of the Most Notorious Female Serial Killers
United States, Appellant, v. Kristen Gilbert, Defendant, Appellee (2000)
VA Nurse Kristen Gilbert Sentenced to Life in Prison for Killing Four Veterans: Stanley Jagodowski, Henry Hudon, Kenneth Cutting & Edward Skwira (March 26, 2001)
Kristen Gilbert | Poisonous Women | Deadly Women
Kristen Gilbert | Prescription for Death | Snapped Notorious: Kristen Gilbert (S23, E17)
Watch Notorious: Kristen Gilbert | Snapped on the Web

American Experience PBS Premiered ‘Oklahoma City’: Timothy McVeigh & Terry Nichols Conspired to Bomb the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (February 7, 2017)

Oklahoma City American Experience PBS

‘Oklahoma City’ American Experience PBS

“On April 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh, a former soldier deeply influenced by the literature and ideas of the radical right, parked a Ryder truck with a five-ton fertilizer bomb in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal building in Oklahoma City. Moments later, 168 people were killed and 675 were injured in the blast. Oklahoma City traces the events — including the deadly encounters between American citizens and law enforcement at Ruby Ridge and Waco — that led McVeigh to commit the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history. With a virulent strain of anti-government anger still with us, the film is both a cautionary tale and an extremely timely warning.” -Oklahoma City, American Experience PBS

Watch ‘Oklahoma City’ here.

American Experience PBS:

Premiering at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Coming to American Experience PBS on February 7, 2017 at 9/8c. -American Experience, PBS

After the Oklahoma City Bombing, Clinton’s ability to reach Americans on a personal level did much to help the nation’s grief. “It’s kind of a throwaway line now, I feel your pain, but he literally could,” says Robert McNeely. “I mean he could take people and just hug them and connect to them in a way and really listen to them.” -American Experience, PBS

Oklahoma City explores how a series of deadly encounters between American citizens and federal law enforcement—including the standoffs at Ruby Ridge and Waco—led to the bombing of the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City in April 1995, the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history. -American Experience, PBS

At the time of the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was home to several government agencies — and a daycare. -American Experience, PBS

During the stand-off between federal agents and the Branch Davidians in Waco, Texas in 1993, people gathered on a hill roughly three miles away to see what was happening at the compound. One of those drawn to Waco was a 24-year-old Army veteran named Timothy McVeigh. -American Experience, PBS

Filmmaker Barak Goodman and editor Don Kleszy discuss their newest documentary, “Oklahoma City” and how it led to the creation of another one-hour film about Ruby Ridge. -American Experience, PBS

The 1995 Oklahoma City Bombing was the largest act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. A new documentary on the PBS series American Experience takes a fresh look at the events and motivations that led to the attack by Timothy McVeigh, and finds resonance for today. -PBS NewsHour

At the 20th anniversary, we look back at the Oklahoma City bombing. Public television station OETA shares reflections from survivors and victims’ families, and Judy Woodruff talks to former Deputy Attorney General Jamie Gorelick, former Director of Homeland Security of Oklahoma Kerry Pettingill and Barry Grissom, U.S. attorney for the district of Kansas, for lessons learned from the attack. -PBS NewsHour

On April 19, 1995, Timothy McVeigh, a former soldier deeply influenced by the literature and ideas of the radical right, parked a Ryder truck with a five-ton fertilizer bomb in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal building in Oklahoma City. Moments later, 168 people were killed and 675 were injured in the blast. OKLAHOMA CITY traces the events — including the deadly encounters between American citizens and law enforcement at Ruby Ridge and Waco — that led McVeigh to commit the worst act of domestic terrorism in American history. With a virulent strain of anti-government anger still with us, the film is both a cautionary tale and an extremely timely warning. -YouTube Movies

Related Links:
Oklahoma City Bombing
Oklahoma City Bombing – FBI
Oklahoma City bombing – HISTORY
Oklahoma City Bombing Fast Facts
The Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum
Oklahoma City National Memorial (U.S. National Park Service)
Oklahoma City Bombing: 168 People Died in an Act of Domestic Terrorism at the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building (April 19, 1995)
Oxygen Premiered ‘In Defense Of Timothy McVeigh’: Convicted Oklahoma City Bomber Executed by Feds in 2001 for Terrorism (June 25, 2018)
Film Review: ‘Oklahoma City’ | Variety
From the ashes: Documentarian revisits horrific bombing in ‘Oklahoma City’
Oklahoma City PBS Documentary Explores America’s Tradition of Anti-Government Terrorism
Review: ‘Oklahoma City’ Recalls a Chilling Attack With Lessons for Today
New film links McVeigh to far right before bombing in OKC
Movie review: ‘Oklahoma City’ bombing documentary serves as timely cautionary tale
Oklahoma City: A Cautionary Tale of Hate in America | American Experience | PBS

YouTube:
Oklahoma City Teaser | American Experience | PBS
Oklahoma City | Promo | American Experience | PBS
Oklahoma City Official Trailer 1 (2017) – Documentary
American Experience | The Oklahoma City Bombing | PBS
Chapter 1 | Oklahoma City | PBS
The Murrah Building | Oklahoma City | American Experience | PBS
Timothy McVeigh at Waco | Oklahoma City | American Experience | PBS
Interview: Barak Goodman & Don Kleszy | Oklahoma City & Ruby Ridge
Tracing the roots of the America’s biggest domestic terror attack | PBS NewsHour
‘There was no playbook’ for handling the Oklahoma City bombing | PBS NewsHour
American Experience: Oklahoma City | PBS | YouTube Movies
Clinton | American Experience | PBS

Fear Thy Neighbor Premiered ‘Kill-De-Sac’ on Investigation Discovery: Robert Lorenz Shoots Duren Eldridge, Claims Self-Defense, Acquitted of Murder (June 1, 2015)

ID Go: When a freewheeling family moves from California to the buttoned down enclave of Leesburg, Virginia, they quickly get on the wrong side of their neighbour across the way. The conflict escalates until bullets fly and blood flows in the street. -Kill-De-Sac, Fear Thy Neighbor (S2, E8)

Date: April 9, 1995
Victim: Duren Eldridge, 31, truck driver
Offender: Robert ‘Bob’ Lorenz, 54, military veteran, federal employee
Location: Leesburg, Virginia
Circumstances: Annoyed with dog peeing on his lawn, Duren’s car rolled into his car and hit it causing minor damage, kids on skateboards were too loud, Bob called police & complained about neighbors multiple times, Bob yelled at the kids at Duren’s house, during confrontation at Bob’s front door, Bob shot Duren with handgun and Duren died
Disposition: Lorenz claimed self-defense, justified shooting, acquitted of murder

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch all of the Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. Download the ID Go app and binge away. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $2.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict.

Related Links:
Jury Acquits Virginia Man Who Killed Neighbor
Fastidious Homeowner Acquitted of Murdering Raucous Neighbor
Man Who Shot And Killed Angry Neighbor Acquitted
Man Acquitted in Slaying of Neighbor
Loudon Slaying Acquittal Greeted with Accolades and Anger
Loudon Verdict Fits Community
Man Who Shot Neighbor to Pay $30,000 Settlement
Kill-De-Sac | Fear Thy Neighbor | Investigation Discovery (S2, E8)
Kill-De-Sac | Fear Thy Neighbor | Investigation Discovery (website)
Kill-De-Sac | Fear Thy Neighbor | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
Fear Thy Neighbor: 23 Veteran Cases Featured on Investigation Discovery

Homicide Hunter Premiered ‘The Spy Who Killed Me’ on ID: William Jennes II Shot & Killed Wife Elspeth ‘Elsie’ Jennes Over Finances (October 30, 2012)

Housewife Elsie Jennes is found dead in the basement of her burning home. Lt Joe Kenda has no leads until Elsie’s son, William, turns up in a police station over 50 miles away, equipped with a suitcase, a pet yellow labrador, and a bizarre story to tell. -The Spy Who Killed Me, Homicide Hunter (S2, E4)

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $3.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict. Download the ID Go app or purchase ID True Crime Files & binge away.

Related Links:
News Footage 1995: Elspeth T. Jennes Case | Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda
Actual news footage from 1995 surrounding the Elspeth Jennes case | Homicide Hunter: Lt. Joe Kenda
The Spy Who Killed Me | Homicide Hunter | Investigation Discovery (preview)
The Spy Who Killed Me | Homicide Hunter | Investigation Discovery (S2, E4)
The Spy Who Killed Me | Homicide Hunter | Investigation Discovery (website)
The Spy Who Killed Me | Homicide Hunter | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
The Spy Who Killed Me | Homicide Hunter | Investigation Discovery (Hulu)
Elsie Jennes Found Murdered in House Fire; Army Veteran William Jennes II Pleaded Guilty to 2nd Degree Murder, Sentenced to 48 Years in Prison (July 17, 1995)

Under the Sabers: The Unwritten Code of Army Wives by Tanya Biank (February 7, 2006)

Army Wives Lifetime

Army Wives, a Lifetime television series based on the non-fiction book written by Tanya Biank.

In Their Name:
Colette, Kimberley & Kristen MacDonald, Fort Bragg (Feb. 17, 1970)
Michael James & Jackie Burden, Fayetteville, NC (December 7, 1995)
Captain Frank ‘Marty’ Theer, U.S. Air Force (December 17, 2000)
Lt. Col. Rennie Cory, U.S. Army, Fort Bragg (April 7, 2001)
Pfc. Gary Shane Kalinofski, U.S. Army, Fort Drum (March 4, 2002)
Army Spouse Teresa Nieves, North Carolina (June 11, 2002)
Army Spouse Jennifer Wright, North Carolina (June 29, 2002)
Army Spouse Marilyn Styles-Griffin, North Carolina (July 9, 2002)
Army Spouse & Veteran Andrea Floyd, North Carolina (July 19, 2002)
Major David Shannon, U.S. Army, Fort Bragg (July 23, 2002)
Sgt. Erin Edwards, U.S. Army, Fort Hood (July 22, 2004)
Sgt. Ronna Valentine, U.S. Army, Fort Bragg (May 21, 2005)

Under the Sabers: The Unwritten Code of Army Wives or Army Wives by Tanya Biank was an excellent read. I first heard about the book when I was researching the 2002 Fort Bragg murders of Teresa Nieves, Jennifer Wright, Marilyn Griffin, Andrea Floyd and Major David Shannon. I ordered it from Amazon and threw it in a pile with all my other military crime books until I saw a Forbidden: Dying for Love episode about the murder of Army spouse Jennifer Wright. The show didn’t mention it but I knew Jennifer’s murder was one of five homicides at Fort Bragg that occurred within a two month period in 2002. I learned more about Jennifer Wright from Investigation Discovery than what’s available on-line. And at the time, the national media was quick to speculate whether war & violence, frequent deployments or anti-malaria drugs were to blame. But after the Army investigated itself, it determined that the high operational tempo after September 11, 2001 placed a great strain on already troubled marriages.

In other words, some form of domestic abuse, financial issues, and adultery in some cases were to blame for stained marriages. I researched the five murders and the motives were similar in four of the cases. Arguments were a pre-cursor to the murders and three out of four of the spouses wanted to leave the relationship. Was rejection the trigger? Domestic violence experts agree leaving the relationship is the most dangerous time. In Major Shannon’s case, it appears that the motive was greed, pure and simple, as greed is one of the most common motives for female killers. Major Shannon’s wife Joan stood to gain a large amount of money from his Serviceman’s Group Life Insurance (SGLI) if he died. This time the Army was most likely correct but unfortunately things haven’t changed to this day. There have been many more victims of domestic violence in the military since 2002 and this book inspired me to honor each and every one of them.

The author Tanya Biank grew up in a military family and covered military issues at Fort Bragg as a reporter for the Fayetteville Observer. Tanya was able to give us a realistic perspective of what was going on at Fort Bragg during the time period right before and after September 11, 2001. Tanya was the one writing about the rash of homicides for the local newspaper during the summer of 2002. As a result of Tanya’s reporting, the main stream media picked up the story and it went national and international. Fort Bragg was forced to answer to a frenzied pack of media outlets and in typical fashion, the Army investigated itself and found themselves not responsible. Although Tanya reported in the book that Congress authorized $5 million for domestic violence programs in the military that year. And on December 2, 2002, President Bush signed into law an act that makes domestic violence protective orders enforceable on military installations.

Tanya was the perfect person to write about Fort Bragg. She had a great understanding of the various perspectives and this was revealed in the book. She talked about how September 11th changed things for both the service member and the families. I found myself feeling thankful for the education about Fort Bragg’s missions and how they fit into the big picture. They train hard for a reason. They are some of the first on the front lines and some of the families have no idea where they are going or how long they will be gone. Unexpectedly, I experienced a myriad of emotions as I read along. Emotions about 9/11, emotions about what was happening at my own squadron, and emotions around the notifications of death. My Commander and a Chaplain informed me of my father’s unexpected death. And my colleagues helped me get home safely. I realized this was standard protocol while reading this book.

I couldn’t put the book down once I started, despite the emotions and memories it triggered. Tanya Biank did a great job of enticing the reader to learn more about the individual and the family, and just when you least expected, the unexpected would happen. It reminded me of my own life and how hard it was to put mission before self year after year when all one was doing was stuffing down the pain. But like those in the book, we don’t seek counseling because it’s considered a career ender. We don’t trust the system so most of us just keep our troubles to ourselves. And for those who want to maintain a security clearance, we know they are going to ask the question about mental health treatment. I understand why the question has to be asked because it’s important to identify someone with suicidal tendencies or anger problems but it prevents the rest of us from asking for the help we need, until it’s too late.

Tanya talked about the unusually high crime rates in Fayetteville and she said its civilians who commit most of the crime. She admitted Fort Bragg was under the shadow of the the murders of Colette, Kimberley & Kristen MacDonald in 1970 because former Captain Jeffrey MacDonald, despite being found guilty, swears he’s innocent. As recently as December 2018, MacDonald was denied a new trial by a federal appeals court and he continues to be the subject of both media and true crime programming. Tanya also talked about the racially motivated murders of Michael James & Jackie Burden in 1995. Army privates James Burmeister and Malcolm Wright were found guilty of the crime. This too made national news and the Army was forced to weed out any perceived Neo-Nazis, white supremacists, and skinheads. The media speculated the Army was full of them; turns out this random attack by Fort Bragg soldiers was an isolated incident.

After researching the five Fort Bragg murders in 2002 on-line, I realized that Tanya’s book was the most comprehensive discussion of the incidents. The book gave us an inside look at the people involved and the way it unfolded real-time. Tanya shared that the military likes to keep their problems under wrap because of the way the media speculates. I can see why they would be annoyed with how scandals are reported. Once the information is out there, it’s hard to fight off the perception. But the bottom line is the acts of a few don’t represent the whole. Unfortunately, I could write book after book about clusters of domestic violence related homicides in the military since 2002. This book made me realize how long the military has known about the problems and that throwing money at the problem doesn’t fix it. We need real solutions that save lives.

Editor’s Note: Tanya Biank’s book Under the Sabers inspired the creation of Army Wives on Lifetime television. After reading the book, I can understand why the series was created in 2007. I included links to the show below if you are interested in watching the series. It was cancelled after seven seasons. 

Related Links:
Tanya Biank (Official Website)
Under the Sabers | Tanya Biank | Macmillan
Under the Sabers: The Unwritten Code of Army Wives
Under the Sabers: The Unwritten Code of Army Wives
Under the Sabers: The Unwritten Code of Army Wives Kindle Edition
Under the Sabers by Tanya Biank (Kirkus Review)
Season 1 | Army Wives | Lifetime Television | Amazon (2007)
Season 2 | Army Wives | Lifetime Television | Amazon (2008)
Season 3 | Army Wives | Lifetime Television | Amazon (2009)
Season 4 | Army Wives | Lifetime Television | Amazon (2010)
Season 5 | Army Wives | Lifetime Television | Amazon (2011)
Season 6 | Army Wives | Lifetime Television | Amazon (2012)
Season 7 | Army Wives | Lifetime Television | Amazon (2013)
‘Army Wives’ Deployed as Lifetime Series
Lifetime embraces ‘Wives’ amid show cuts
A Sneak Peek at “Army Wives”
Home front key to “Army Wives”
‘Army Wives’ Still Holding Down The Fort
Lifetime’s popular ‘Army Wives’ has a local ties
Lifetime Cancels ‘Army Wives’ | The Wrap
‘Army Wives’ cancelled by Lifetime | Entertainment Weekly
‘Army Wives’ canceled by Lifetime; retrospective special planned
Lifetime’s ‘Army Wives’ Cancelled After Seven Seasons, Will Wrap Run With Special
Fort Meade: Military spouse writes book about servicewomen
Army Wive: Where is the Cast Now?
Army Wives | ABC | Season 1-7

Forensic Files Premiered ‘Plastic Puzzle’: Navy Veteran Kirk Hudson Struck & Killed in Hit-And-Run Accident in Kalamazoo, Michigan (June 1, 2005)

A man riding a bicycle was fatally injured, and police believed he was the victim of a hit-and-run accident. Tiny clues found at the scene created a picture of the vehicle which struck him and led police to its driver. -Plastic Puzzle, Forensic Files (S10,E3)

Editor’s Note: Full episodes of Forensic Files are available on a variety of media platforms. FilmRise Channel and Forensic Files Channel both feature full episodes of Forensic Files on YouTube. You can also find full episodes of Forensic Files on both Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. On Netflix, the seasons are grouped as collection 1-9. On Amazon Prime Video, you can find Season 1-10 here; Season 11; Season 12; Season 13; Season 14; Season 15; Season 16; Season 17; Season 18; Season 19; Season 20; and Season 21. Start bingeing and see for yourself why Forensic Files is such a hit!

Related Links:
Kirk Glenstan Hudson (February 18, 1995)
Plastic Puzzle | Forensic Files | IMDb
Plastic Puzzle | Forensic Files | FilmRise (S10,E3)
Plastic Puzzle | Forensic Files | Full Episodes (YouTube)
Plastic Puzzle | Forensic Files | Netflix (Collection 2, E11)
Plastic Puzzle | Forensic Files | Amazon Prime Video (S10,E1)
Forensic Files: 9 Active Duty Military and Veteran Homicide Cases [Full Episodes]
PEOPLE of the State of Michigan, Plaintiff-Appellant v. James Arthur NORTHEY, Defendant-Appellee (Court of Appeals of Michigan, 1998)