48 Hours Premiered ‘Hunted’ on CBS (2017)


“48 Hours” goes inside the mind of a serial rapist hunting his victims while two detectives were hunting him. Correspondent Maureen Maher investigates Saturday, Sept. 16 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.

On August 11, 2008, Marc Patrick O’Leary raped an eighteen year old at knife point in Lynnwood, Washington. The 18 year old woman reported the rape to her local police department but they accused her of lying and she was charged with false reporting. In 2011, Marc O’Leary was arrested in Colorado for rape and consequently admitted to raping several women in Washington and Colorado. DNA, digital evidence, and O’Leary’s vehicle linked him physically to several rapes. Read more here.

Related Links:
An Unbelievable Story of Rape
“48 Hours” preview: Hunted
Sneak peek: Hunted | 48 Hours
Covering the unbearable | 48 Hours
“48 Hours” investigates the hunt for a serial rapist
Netflix series to tell story of rapist Marc O’Leary
Netflix series to tell story of rapist Marc O’Leary (2)
Army Soldier Marc O’Leary Raped an 18 Year Old Woman in Washington; Three Years Later Arrested in Colorado for Rape & Sentenced to 300 Plus Years (2008)

48 Hours Premiered ‘Crime & Punishment’ on CBS (2017)


“48 Hours” Presents: A stepfather sits in prison for killing his wife. Her daughters vow to keep him there. Does he deserve parole? Correspondent Tracy Smith investigates Saturday, July 1 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on CBS.

Phonthip (Boonack) Ott, 33, disappeared from her home in California on May 17, 1992. A couple months later, Phonthip Ott’s dead body was discovered in the Sacramento River near Sacramento. Phonthips body was stuffed in a large nylon duffle bag about 5 feet tall. It was held down with H-shaped cement anchors. The day their mother disappeared, Phonthip’s daughters, Tippy Dhaliwal, 14, and Jeanette Marine, 10, spent the day with their grandparents. Upon their return home, the two girls sensed something was wrong when their mother wasn’t home and immediately suspected their stepfather of killing her. Dennis Ott was an active duty petty officer in the U.S. Coast Guard and his relationship with Phonthip was tumultuous. Read more from Military Justice for All here.

Related Links:
’48 Hours’ Sneak Peek
Sneak peek: Crime & Punishment | 48 Hours
Ott case: Sheriff zeroes in on a murder suspect | 48 Hours
Notebook: The possibility of parole | 48 Hours
Murder victim’s daughters share their emotional journey | 48 Hours
Remembering Phonthip Ott | 48 Hours
The possibility of parole: “48 Hours” examines life after a murder verdict
Ott murder: Crime & Punishment | 48 Hours (website)
California Sisters: Keep our mom’s killer behind bars!
Phonthip Boonack, Dennis Ott: ’48 Hours’ Reels In Case Of Missing Mother Found Dead In California River
‘He deserves to rot in prison’: Sisters fight to keep their mother’s killer behind bars as he comes up for parole 25 years after the victim’s body was pulled from a river in a weighted duffel bag
Phonthip Ott Discovered Dead in California River; Spouse Dennis Ott, US Coast Guard, Convicted of Murder and Sentenced to Life in Prison (1992)

Army Infantryman Sgt. 1st Class Grant Shanaman of Fort Bragg, North Carolina Found Dead in Off Post Residence (2016)

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Sgt. 1st Class Grant Shanaman, US Army

Sgt. 1st Class Grant Shanaman, 38, US Army, of Media, Pennsylvania was found dead in his Fayetteville, North Carolina home on November 16th, 2016. Sgt. 1st Class Shanaman enlisted in the Army in 1998 (18 years) and served 10 combat deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sgt. 1st Class Shanaman was a highly decorated infantryman assigned to the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. The Army reports that civilian law enforcement are investigating the incident. Sgt. 1st Class Shanaman is one of three US Army soldiers who died stateside on November 16, 2016. Pvt. Kevin Paulino of Fort Hood and Pfc. David Winchester of Fort Bragg also died in garrison. Pfc. Winchester was found dead in his barracks at Fort Bragg and the Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) is investigating that incident.

Related Links:
Obituary: Grant Shanaman
82nd Airborne paratrooper dies at home in North Carolina
Fort Bragg soldier who deployed 10 times dies in off-post residence
Fort Bragg paratrooper who served in Iraq, Afghanistan dies off-post, officials say
Fayetteville police investigating death of Fort Bragg soldier
Valor Fights releases statement on passing of Grant Shanaman
Security enterprise builds partnership with Liberian Army
DVIDS: SGT Richard Cole vs. SFC Grant Shanaman
Ranger Wins MCoE Pistol Title

Army Spc. Phillip Cruz-Medellin of Fort Riley Found Dead in Nearby Manhattan, Kansas, Under Investigation by Civilian Authorities (2016)

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Spc. Phillip Cruz-Medellin, US Army

Spc. Phillip Cruz-Medellin, US Army, was found dead in Manhattan, Kansas on November 15, 2016. Spc. Cruz-Medellin was a satellite communications operator and maintainer at nearby Fort Riley. He was from Prairie Lea, Texas and enlisted in the Army in October 2014. Reports indicate that his death is under investigation by the local civilian authorities.

Related Links:
Fort Riley Soldier Found Dead
Fort Riley soldier found dead in Manhattan
Fort Riley soldier found dead in Manhattan
Big Red One Soldier Found Dead in Manhattan
Army identifies 1st Infantry Division soldier found dead near Fort Riley
Death of Fort Riley soldier in Manhattan under investigation
Fort Riley soldier found dead, investigation underway

Fort Hood Army Pvt. Nathan Berg Died of a Gunshot Wound in Killeen, Texas (2016)

US Army

Pvt. Nathan Berg, US Army

Army Pvt. Nathan Berg, 20, died of an apparent gunshot wound in Killeen, Texas on September 17, 2016. Pvt. Berg’s home of record is listed as Bellevue, Nebraska and he entered military service in May 2016. Pvt. Berg was a combat engineer assigned to the Reception Detachment, United States Army Garrison at Fort Hood. According to a Fort Hood press release, the circumstances surrounding the incident are under investigation by the Killeen Police Department. The circumstances surrounding his death and official cause of death are unknown.

Related Links:
Obituary: Berg, Nathan J. PVT US Army
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier
Fort Hood soldier dies from gunshot wound
Fort Hood releases name of soldier found dead in Killeen
Fort Hood: Army identifies soldier who died from gunshot wound
Soldier found dead in Texas identified as Bellevue native
Soldier from Bellevue, stationed at Ft. Hood, found dead of gunshot wound
Bellevue Soldier Death Investigation
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

Marine Corps Reservist Rosendo Rodriguez Murdered Summer Baldwin and Unborn Child; Sentenced to Death in Texas for Two Capital Murders (2005)

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Summer Baldwin and Rosendo Rodriguez, US Marine Corps Reserve

On September 13, 2005, Summer Baldwin, 29, was found in a suitcase in a landfill in Lubbock, Texas. After an extensive investigation, authorities zeroed in on US Marine Corps Reservist Rosendo Rodriguez. In the course of the investigation, Rodriguez also admitted to murdering Joanna Rogers, 16, on May 4, 2004 in Lubbock Texas. Rodriguez was found guilty of two capital murders: Summer Baldwin and her unborn baby. Rosendo Rodriguez was sentenced to death in the State of Texas. Rodriguez appealed his death penalty conviction but a federal court denied the request in May 2017.

On September 13, 2005, the Lubbock Texas landfill discovered the dead body of a female in a suitcase. The horrified foreman called the police and they rushed to the scene. The police believed that any human being that can do this to another human being is the lowest form of life. Police were angered by the injuries and pain Summer must have suffered with. She most likely died 48 hours prior to the discovery of her body. Police noted the landfill is not a sanitary place and it makes it difficult to collect forensic evidence. Investigators had to turn to her body to find clues. The medical examiner found a tattoo ‘Summer’ on her wrist and they entered her fingerprints in the system in the hopes they could determine who she was. They learned the deceased individual was Summer Baldwin. The police now had the difficult task of informing her mother 200 miles away in Roswell, New Mexico.

Summer grew up in New Mexico. She studied cosmetology and eventually ended up in Lubbock, Texas near her Aunt Terri to make a life for herself. Aunt Terri shared that Summer was only in Lubbock for 3 or 4 days and that was the last time she saw her. Upon the examination of Summer’s body, it was noted there were very obvious injuries to her body and she fought back against her attacker. She was severely beaten before she died and was thrown out like garbage. It broke her family’s heart to learn that she suffered so much before dying. Anyone could have done it and police needed leads. They began with the garbage collection employees to determine which dumpster she had been found in. The police looked at CCTV but the footage was useless. The medical examiner also determined that Summer was about five weeks pregnant. In Texas, this was a double homicide.

To investigators, an unborn child meant there was a father out there and a potential suspect. The police started reaching out to friends and family to learn more about Summer’s life and the one name that kept surfacing was Margie Estrada. Police would learn the two were inseparable friends. After informing a shocked Margie that Summer was dead, she was quick to offer up a suspect, Laquincy Freeman. Summer and Laquincy were boyfriend/girlfriend and known for stints of verbal altercations. He was definitely someone police needed to question if they could track him down. Finally they obtained an address for him so they picked Laquincy up for questioning. At this point, he was considered the prime suspect. He seemed strangely calm about Summer’s death but he admitted they dated, broke up, and he moved on. He wasn’t anywhere near his ex at the time of her murder. Police ask him to take a lie detector test and he passed with no signs of deception. The police let him go.

After some time passed, Summer’s best friend Margie went back to the police station because she felt she left out an important detail. She said she spotted Summer at a 7-11 convenience store and she was with a man she had never seen before. But she was able to describe him as a light skinned Hispanic who was clean cut. Margie said Summer drove off with him and provided a scant description of the vehicle: a red pick-up. Police chased this lead and headed to the 7-11 convenience store to look at the CCTV video footage. They hoped it would help them determine who was with Summer that night and maybe even what he was driving. The detectives catch a break and spot the red pick-up truck at about 11:30 p.m.; they are able to determine it’s most likely a Dodge Ram but couldn’t see Summer or ID the driver.

Detectives next turned to the suitcase to see if they could find any evidence. They observed the suitcase appeared to be new as if it was recently purchased. They found a UPC code on the inside and hoped it was traceable. They learned Wal-Mart was the only store that carried that suitcase and there were only two Wal-Marts in Lubbock. They headed to the stores and learned that specific suitcase was sold a couple of times, one in the afternoon and one at 3 a.m., a couple hours after Summer was spotted at the 7-11. Detectives combed through the CCTV video footage at Wal-Mart and saw the suitcase being purchased in the afternoon but couldn’t see the person. But they were able to track down the purchaser via a Wal-Mart loyalty card. This person came back clean so they moved on to the suitcase purchased at 3:20 a.m.

When they were viewing the CCTV video footage, all the police could see was a Hispanic male with a military haircut purchasing a suitcase. But when they looked closer, this same person made a second purchase; they would learn via other video footage in the store that the second purchase was a box of latex gloves. This was consistent with someone who didn’t want to get caught. In hindsight, this was a chilling combination. Now they needed to tie this individual to a red truck so they used outside CCTV video footage to track his movements in the parking lot. They observed this man calmly walk out, dragging the suitcase in hand, and he headed towards a dark colored pick-up truck. They couldn’t make out the vehicle on his way out but they were able to determine the make of the pick-up truck on his way into the Wal-Mart parking lot. But the footage was too blurry to give them a license plate number. Police were certain they had their man.

The Lubbock police zeroed in on their new suspect. They had him on camera and observed he used a debit or credit card to make the suitcase purchase. The police had to get a search warrant for the bank so they could determine who owned that card. The card belonged to Rosendo Rodriguez, a 25 year old whose permanent residence was 400 miles away in San Antonio, Texas. The debit card also reveals Rodriguez made another purchase in Lubbock on the day of Summer’s murder. It was a purchase at the same 7-11 Summer had been spotted at prior to her murder. The video footage police collected was crucial because it proved that Rodriguez was in the general vicinity on the day of the murder. After getting a name, police learned Rodriguez was a Reservist with the US Marine Corps and his reserve unit was based in Lubbock, Texas. Police contacted the Marines and learn that Rodriguez did not stay on base because he normally stays at a Holiday Inn.

The Holiday Inn Rodriguez usually stayed at just happened to be across the street from the same 7-11 where he made a purchase the day Summer Baldwin was last seen alive. Investigators raced to the hotel but Rodriguez had already checked out but they were able to search his hotel room. The police called in the forensic’s team for assistance and they found a patch of dry blood, a Wal-Mart bag, and some latex gloves. Now, detectives were ready to arrest Rosendo Rodriguez. And it wasn’t hard because he was at his mother’s house. Once questioned, he talked and told a very self serving story. He admitted to taking Summer back to his room and having consensual sex with her. But then he claims they got into an argument and she pulled a knife out on him. In self-defense, he put her in a choke hold and she still wouldn’t drop the knife. Eventually she stopped fighting and dropped to the floor.

Rosendo’s statement to the police did not match the medical examiner’s findings whatsoever. The police deduced Rodriguez was just a liar. Rodriguez even had an excuse for the blood at the scene; he claimed Summer had a nose bleed. Everything Rodriguez said was inconsistent with the forensic evidence. In March 2008, Rosendo Rodriguez went on trial in Texas for two capital murders: Summer and her unborn child. Shockingly, Rodriguez also admitted to killing Joanna Rogers. She was someone that had been missing since 2004 and it appeared that he murdered Joanna and Summer in the same way. Rodriguez had an excuse for Joanna’s murder too. He claimed she started raising her voice so he put his hands around her throat and choked her. On April 1st, 2008, Rosendo Rodriguez was found guilty of two capital murders in Texas and sentenced to death. Summer’s mom is devastated by the loss and aid she was patiently awaiting the execution date.

Related Links:
Missing in America
New Details in Summer Baldwin Murder Case
Break in Disappearance of Texas Teenager
Mother Agonizes Over Missing Teen
Joanna Rogers’ Family Speaks Out About Alleged Murder Confession
Baldwin possibly alive when stuffed in suitcase, put in Lubbock Dumpster
Man who stuffed pregnant woman in suitcase convicted of murder
Killer who dumped pregnant woman’s body gets death
Rosendo Rodriguez Capital Murder Trial – Day Three Wrap-Up
Rodriguez gets death penalty in Baldwin murder
Six year anniversary of the disappearance of Joanna Rogers
Rosendo Rodriguez III v. State of Texas (2011)
Rodriguez appeal to resume in June
Rosendo Rodriguez Back in Lubbock to Appeal Death Penalty
Lubbock judge recommends denial of ‘suitcase killer’ appeal
Judge recommends ‘Suitcase Killer’ Rodriguez’s latest appeal be denied
Appeal rejected for man convicted of killing pregnant Lubbock woman
Execution date set for death row inmate from Lubbock
Rosendo Rodriguez III v Texas Department of Criminal Justice (2017)
San Antonio man condemned for killing pregnant Lubbock woman loses federal appeal
Condemned Texas man loses appeal in death of pregnant woman
Man condemned for killing West Texas woman loses federal appeal
Suitcase Killer Solved (YouTube)
Forensic Files: Seeing Red (YouTube)


When a young woman is found dead in a Texas landfill, detectives race to discover the killer behind the brutal crime. With no leads, police turn to their only witnesses: video cameras that captured the murderer’s chilling attempt to cover his tracks. -Investigation Discovery

Fort Carson Army Soldier Nolly Depadua Killed Air Force Spouse Lourdes Riddle to Silence Sextortion Threats; Sentenced to 14 Years in Prison, Out in 7 (March 26, 1985)

ID Go: After Lourdes Riddle in found strangled to death in the trunk of her car, homicide detective Joe Kenda follows the trail through a twisting maze of military and cultural secrets. Just what was Lourdes doing behind her husband’s back? -Secret Life, Homicide Hunter (S1, E5)

Investigation Discovery featured back to back episodes of Homicide Hunter with Lt. Joe Kenda. Kenda is a retired detective from the Colorado Springs Police Department. Colorado Springs is also the home of US Army base Fort Carson and Peterson Air Force Base. As a result, Lt. Kenda worked closely with investigating authorities at both bases throughout the years when one of his murder cases involved a member of the military or their dependents. If a crime against a military member or their dependents occurred off-base within the jurisdiction of Colorado Springs, Lt. Joe Kenda had the legal authority to investigate the strangling death of an Air Force wife found in the jurisdiction of Colorado Springs.

Construction workers found an abandoned car that had been set on fire on their property on March 26, 1985. The scene looked suspicious so they contacted the police to investigate the situation. The police found Air Force spouse Lourdes Riddle strangled to death in the trunk of her own car. Lt. Joe Kenda was called to the scene to investigate the crime further and determined that whoever killed Lourdes also tried to cover up their crime. They found that an accelerant (gasoline) was used to burn the car and a brick was on the driver’s side floor of the car (as if it was used to hold down the gas pedal). As Kenda was processing the crime scene, two Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) personnel showed up and claimed they were taking charge of the investigation. They informed Kenda they had the husband, TSgt Mark Riddle, who worked at NORAD, Cheyenne Mountain, in custody on Peterson AFB.

Kenda’s response to the Air Force Office of Special Investigations personnel was priceless and proves that he truly is a fierce detective that all law enforcement should emulate. He was not intimidated by the feds in the least bit when the crime occurred in his jurisdiction. He shared that even it was their house, how dare they walk into his crime scene. Kenda was absolutely shocked when they shared they had enlisted soldier, Mark Riddle, in their office at Peterson AFB. Their attitude was that it was obvious who did it because in most cases it was the husband or boyfriend. When in fact, Kenda was disappointed that they may have tainted the case by initiating an ‘immediate arrest’. He was afraid that this outside agency, who had no jurisdiction, had advised Mark Riddle of his rights and he would want a lawyer now. His guilt was not obvious to Kenda who did not automatically assume that the husband committed the crime. He simply wanted to talk to him, not accuse him. Kenda felt that their actions may prevent him from doing an interview which could really damage the case. Kenda admitted to making mistakes in his lifetime but he also shared that he gets really upset when someone else makes them for him. If all investigators operated like Kenda and made assumptions based on fact finding, we could better protect the due process rights of individuals.

Kenda gains access to Mark Riddle and learns that Lourdes is a 31 year old from the Philliphines who has been married to him for nine years. There was in fact trouble in paradise and Mark admitted that his wife had been spending time with and maybe even sleeping with other men. They were not happily married. He claimed he was home the night of the murder and had no alibi. Mark asked for a polygraph test to prove his innocence and passed it, then let the investigators search his home. Although adultery is a motive for murder, Kenda determined that Mark Riddle was honest, credible, and was no longer considered a suspect. This case was not a sex crime but it was a personal and angry crime as evidenced by the ligature strangulation. Kenda felt that this person wanted to punish her and wanted to feel her die. This person was deemed the “Pantyhose Strangler” in the media. After talking to Lourdes family, Kenda learned that Lourdes was threatened by more then one person. Kenda wasn’t sure if she was a target because of Mark’s work at a secret military base or if it was because of her own secret life.

The Air Force couple lived on Peterson AFB. Kenda learned that Lourdes went to night clubs that soldiers frequented. She was into the nightlife, partying, and dancing. Her neighbors reported that she was in and out of the house all the time, usually dressed up with high heels, short skirts and make-up. During Kenda’s investigation into the circumstances of Lourdes secret life, rumors began to circulate at the enlisted men’s club on Fort Carson that she was extorting Army soldiers. In the meantime because of media coverage, an eye witness came forward with a description of a suspect that was found near the scene of the crime that night. He was a black male about 6’8. Kenda asked those who frequented the enlisted club on base if she was dating anyone matching the description. He learned that she only dated Phillipino men and wouldn’t give any other guy the time of day. The rumor was that she draws soldiers in like a Venis flytrap. She specifically sought out Phillipino soldiers. She would have a relationship with them, claim that she was pregnant, and threaten to go to their military Commander if they did not give her money for an abortion.

Lt. Kenda learned of blackmail accusations involving Nolly Depadua, a Phillipino soldier stationed at Fort Carson. Nolly had a friend named Brian Hawkins, also a Fort Carson soldier, who matched the description of the suspect described near the scene of the crime the night Lourdes was murdered. Kenda spoke to Brian with the approach that the facts would give him a theory. Initially Hawkins denied any involvement but Kenda believed that he was lying based on his body language during the interview. He requested he undergo a polygraph test and Hawkins failed miserably. When confronted with the results, Hawkins begins to cry. Hawkins told Kenda that Lourdes wanted money from Nolly Depadua. She claimed she was pregnant and was going to contact the Commander if he didn’t give her money. Nolly was concerned that his family would be ashamed of him if he got kicked out of the military. Nolly strangled Lourdes with the pantyhose.

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Nolly Depadua, U.S. Army

Kenda arrested Nolly and learned from him that they had sex, and she wanted $1000 for an abortion. According to Nolly, Lourdes took his Army dress uniform, used it as ransom, and threatened to burn it if he didn’t give her the money. His career and that uniform meant everything to him. The night of the murder, Nolly asked Lourdes to meet him and give him back his uniform. Lourdes showed up without the uniform. He snapped and strangled her to death in an effort to solve his extortion problems and save his career. Nolly elicits the help of Brian to help him get rid of the body. Unlike in the movies, the car did not explode in a ball of flames like the pair was expecting. The evidence at the scene of the crime was mostly unharmed. According to Kenda, both of the soldiers appeared to show remorse for the crime. Although Lourdes Riddle was a participant in her own death and her behavior caused this reaction, she did not deserve to die. Nolly Depadua made a decision to take a life and you can’t do that. Due to the circumstances surrounding the homicide, he was found guilty of second degree murder and sentenced to fourteen years in prison. He was released after seven. Lt. Kenda ended the show with: “saying she got what she deserved is not fair.”

A couple issues come to mind when it comes to the way the military handles investigations of felony crimes. Why did the Air Force Office of Special Investigations want to take jurisdiction of this case? Why did they do an ‘immediate arrest’ instead of investigating the circumstances and basing their decisions on fact finding? Why don’t they realize that their actions actually hinder the thorough investigations of cases. Research does in fact support that most spouses are murdered by their significant others but we have this thing called due process in the civilian world. The way Kenda felt about OSI interfering and possibly damaging the case was legitimate. And Kenda approached the investigation of the case in the way that detectives should move forward. He simply wanted to talk to the spouse, not accuse of him of the crime. So far there was no evidence to prove that Mark Lourdes had committed the crime. The way the Air Force OSI handled this case is part of the reason that the military justice system is under fire. They have been accused of overreach to include not affording due process rights to both victims of crime and those accused of a crime. They have been accused of railroading military members with an iron fist and as Joe Kenda would say ‘draconian and ruthless’ tactics. They have been accused of making a victim fearful of coming forward if they were involved in a military crime, like adultery or drinking underage. Nolly Depadua is yet another example of a crime involving the motive of fear when someone threatens to go to a military commander.

This is the heart of the military justice system debate. A commander hears each person’s story and determines who is guilty and who is not guilty based on that evidence alone usually. Commanders make the decision whether to prosecute someone in the military. If felony cases were handled by prosecutors who understood the modus operandi of sociopaths, psychopaths, and predators, would our soldiers feel more comfortable reporting a crime without the fear of damaging or losing their own career. It’s a theme that comes up over and over in military cases and needs to be examined. Are soldiers hesitant to report crimes perpetrated against them to their Commander if they have engaged in illegal behavior of any kind to include drinking under age and adultery? If this is the case, we must remove this barrier so that our soldiers feel safe to report felony crimes perpetrated against them without fear of losing their careers because they committed a misdemeanor.

If Nolly had a safe place to report that Lourdes was extorting him despite the adultery issue, could we have prevented this murder? We don’t want our soldiers to feel like they have nowhere to turn if they are targeted by those who know how to manipulate unsuspecting Commanders. It’s important to recognize that both male and female soldiers can be targeted by male or female sociopaths and predators. Reporting crimes to your commander is currently a battle of whose story is more believable and what they feel or don’t feel like dealing with. Commanders hold the key to moving forward with a case or not in our current military justice system. Do they have the skills necessary to investigate and determine who should be prosecuted for crimes? Commanders may not realize that they could tip people off who need to be questioned simply by prematurely inquiring into something which creates an opportunity for collusion.

In the civilian world, you most likely will not lose your career for adultery. Yet in the military, adultery is treated like any other crime in the courts martial process and soldiers can and do lose their careers. It’s not worth a life when people feel that they have to take matters into their own hands to protect what should never been taken from them to begin with. This is why the reporting of felony crimes needs to be moved away from the Commander and to a trained investigator who can help the prosecution determine whether a crime has been committed or not. Prosecutors cannot win cases if the defendants are not afforded due process rights. And this is what gives civilian law enforcement the advantage because they are forced to work within a justice system that protects the constitutional rights of the accused. We want to respect those rights in our pursuit of justice because that is how we will get justice. We should ensure our soldiers that if a felony offense is committed against them that they can safely report the crime without the fear of losing their career.

Source: ‘Secret Life’ Homicide Hunter

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch all of the Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. Download the ID Go app and binge away. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $2.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict.

Related Links:
Secret Life | Homicide Hunter | Investigation Discovery (S1, E5)
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Fort Carson, Colorado
Nowhere to Turn: Soldier Extorted by a Military Wife Ends in Murder
Army CID warns Soldiers to beware of ‘sextortion’ scams

Colette, Kimberley & Kristen MacDonald Murdered in NC Home; Former Army Captain Jeffrey MacDonald Convicted of Homicide, Life Sentence (1970)

Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald, was convicted on August 29, 1979 of the murders of his wife, Colette, and his two daughters, Kimberley and Kristen, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The murders occurred on February 17, 1970 while Captain MacDonald was serving as a doctor for Green Berets in the Army. Captain MacDonald was court martialed but a military judge did not find sufficient evidence to proceed with a trial. Captain MacDonald was honorably discharged from the Army. After persistence from Colette’s family, prosecutors in Fayetteville, North Carolina began to pay attention to the homicide case and eventually charged Jeffrey MacDonald with the murders of his family. MacDonald was found guilty by a jury of his peers and received three life sentences. Jeffrey MacDonald maintains his innocence to this day and continues to appeal his convictions.

Related Links:
MacDonald Family
The Jeffrey MacDonald Information Site
Jeffrey MacDonald on Dick Cavett
Jeffrey MacDonald “Kills” One Of His “Assailants”
In 1979, Observer Editor Rick Thames interviewed MacDonald
On-Scene Detective Identifies Cult Members Responsible for 1970 MacDonald ‘Green Beret’ Murders & Army/Police Complicity in Cover-up
Three Trials for Murder
The Devil and Jeffrey MacDonald
The Fort Bragg murders: is Jeffrey MacDonald innocent?
Since 1979, Brian Murtagh has fought to keep convicted murderer Jeffrey MacDonald in prison
Jeffrey MacDonald DNA: Army Doctor Convicted Of Killing Pregnant Wife, Kids Could Clear Name
Larry King Live – Jeffrey MacDonald: In his own words
Maybe Jeffrey MacDonald was innocent after all
DNA and the Jeffrey MacDonald investigation
After 35 years, ‘Fatal Vision’ author, killer meet again
The Devil’s in the Details: Errol Morris on the Jeffrey MacDonald Case
Richard Herman Attorney on CNN Live: Army Doctor Jeffrey MacDonald Case Reopened
The Jeffrey MacDonald Case – A Round Table discussion with Richard Cahn
How I Changed My Mind About the Jeffrey MacDonald Murder Case
Allen Rogers talks about his friend Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald
The controversial case of Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald
The MacDonald Family Murders
The Fort Bragg murders: Is Jeffrey MacDonald innocent?
Federal judge upholds Jeffrey MacDonald murder conviction; his attorney talks about appeal
The Murders of Colette, Kimberley, and Kristen MacDonald
Former prosecutor Jim Blackburn on the Jeffrey MacDonald case
Did Jeffrey MacDonald Kill His Family? Or Was It A Group of Manson Family-Esque, LSD-Raving Hippies
Lawyers for Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald, Fighting in Court Filing to Overturn 1979 Conviction for Murdering Family, Say Prosecutors Hid Evidence
People Magazine Investigates Green Beret Jeffrey MacDonald’s family murder conviction
Ex-Army surgeon pursues appeal, insists he’s innocent in “Fatal Vision” killings
Jeffrey MacDonald gets new court hearing in ‘Fatal Vision’ murder case
MacDonald hearing, likely last chance for exoneration set for Thursday
Green Beret doctor who claims hippies killed his wife and children in 1970 vows to fight on in bid to clear his name despite latest rejection
Captain Jeffrey MacDonald – 40 Years Later
Jeffrey MacDonald gets new evidence hearing after 40 years
Kathryn MacDonald & Dr Jeff MacDonald Ft Bragg Murders
Crimes And Criminals: Jeffrey MacDonald (YouTube)
20/20: Fort Bragg Murders (YouTube)
Fatal Vision – Jeffrey MacDonald Film
False Witness – Trailer on YouTube
False Witness the Movie (YouTube)
Jeffrey MacDonald ‘Fatal Vision’ Murder Case to Get TV Remake
‘Fatal Vision’ becomes final: Jeffrey MacDonald murders get movie treatment again
Timeline of events in the Jeffrey MacDonald case
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Bragg


An army surgeon, Jeffrey MacDonald, is the lone survivor of a brutal 1970 home invasion that claims the lives of his wife and daughters. But authorities doubt his story of murderous hippies and believe MacDonald is the culprit. -Investigation Discovery