Fort Bragg Army Soldiers Spc. Allen Stigler, Jr. and Sgt. Roshain Brooks Died of Wounds Sustained While Engaged in Combat Operations in Iraq (August 13, 2017)

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Spc. Allen Stigler, Jr., US Army and Sgt. Roshain Brooks, US Army

Army soldiers Spc. Allen Stigler, Jr. and Sgt. Roshain Brooks died of wounds sustained while engaged in combat operations on August 13, 2017 in northern Iraq. An Army artillery unit was firing on an Islamic State position when a “mishap” occurred but it was not listed as enemy fire. Five others suffered injuries that were not life-threatening. Spc. Stigler and Sgt. Brooks were supporting Operation Inherent Resolve on behalf of the 2nd Battalion, 319th Airborne Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The incident is under investigation.

An artillery round meant to be fired at an Islamic State target in northern Iraq on Sunday exploded prematurely killing two American soldiers, defense officials said. –Stars and Stripes

Related Links:
DOD Identifies Army Casualties
Pentagon cites artillery “mishap” in 2 US deaths in Iraq
2 US soldiers in Iraq were killed by artillery mishap
Artillery accident kills two US soldiers in Iraq
Pentagon cites artillery “mishap” in 2 US deaths in Iraq
Artillery mishap killed two US soldiers in Iraq
U.S. soldiers in Iraq were killed by artillery ‘mishap’: Pentagon
Two US soldiers killed in ‘mishap’ while firing artillery at ISIS in Iraq
Artillery Mishap Killed Two US Soldiers in Iraq
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death & Suicide at Fort Bragg, North Carolina

Army Sgt. Jonathon Hunter and Spc. Christopher Harris Died After a Vehicle-Borne IED Detonated Near Their Convoy in Afghanistan (August 2, 2017)

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Sgt. Jonathon Hunter, US Army, and Spc. Christopher Harris, US Army

Sgt. Jonathon Hunter, 23, and Spc. Christopher Harris, 25, died as a result of injuries sustained when a vehicle-borne improved explosive device (IED) detonated near their convoy on August 2, 2017 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Sgt. Hunter and Spc. Harris were supporting Operation Inherent Resolve on behalf of the 2nd Battalion, 504th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. According the the Department of Defense press release the incident is under investigation.

Related Links:
DoD Identifies Army Casualties
Two members of 82nd Airborne killed in Afghanistan
Military identifies Fort Bragg soldiers killed in Afghanistan suicide bomb attack
Columbus, Ind., soldier among 2 killed in Afghanistan attack
Specialist Christopher Harris: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Father: Indiana soldier among 2 killed in Afghanistan attack
Fundraiser for pregnant wife of soldier killed in Afghanistan nets $12,000 in four hours

Army Infantryman Sgt. 1st Class Grant Shanaman of Fort Bragg, North Carolina Found Dead in Off Post Residence (2016)

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Sgt. 1st Class Grant Shanaman, US Army

Sgt. 1st Class Grant Shanaman, 38, US Army, of Media, Pennsylvania was found dead in his Fayetteville, North Carolina home on November 16th, 2016. Sgt. 1st Class Shanaman enlisted in the Army in 1998 (18 years) and served 10 combat deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. Sgt. 1st Class Shanaman was a highly decorated infantryman assigned to the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. The Army reports that civilian law enforcement are investigating the incident. Sgt. 1st Class Shanaman is one of three US Army soldiers who died stateside on November 16, 2016. Pvt. Kevin Paulino of Fort Hood and Pfc. David Winchester of Fort Bragg also died in garrison. Pfc. Winchester was found dead in his barracks at Fort Bragg and the Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) is investigating that incident.

Related Links:
Obituary: Grant Shanaman
82nd Airborne paratrooper dies at home in North Carolina
Fort Bragg soldier who deployed 10 times dies in off-post residence
Fort Bragg paratrooper who served in Iraq, Afghanistan dies off-post, officials say
Fayetteville police investigating death of Fort Bragg soldier
Valor Fights releases statement on passing of Grant Shanaman
Security enterprise builds partnership with Liberian Army
DVIDS: SGT Richard Cole vs. SFC Grant Shanaman
Ranger Wins MCoE Pistol Title

Army Spouse Katherine Morris Found Dead in Car Near Mall; Cause of Death Initially Ruled Suicide But Further Investigation Suggests Homicide Motivated by Insurance Fraud (May 6, 2012)

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Katherine Morris

Katherine Morris, 22, was found dead in her car near the Arundel Mills Mall in Maryland on May 6, 2012. Katherine was a University of Maryland student and married to Army spouse, Isaac Goodwin, who was stationed at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. According to a website dedicated to Katherine Morris, she died from carbon monoxide poisoning from charcoal grills lit in her car. Katherine’s family questioned the ruling of suicide by the Army and the Anne Arundel County police department immediately and were eventually successful at getting some retired civilian detectives to look into their suspicions of homicide motivated by life insurance fraud. Interestingly, Anne Arundel County police department also had jurisdiction of the homicide investigation of Army soldier Karlyn Ramirez, who was murdered in 2015. Karlyn’s husband Maliek Kearney and his new girlfriend Doris Delgado face federal murder charges. Karlyn’s homicide is similar in motive to the theories Katherine’s family has about her suspicious death. Karlyn and Katherine both appear to have been targeted and became the victims of domestic violence and/or life insurance fraud. The true motivation behind the Karlyn Ramirez and Katherine Morris deaths is unknown at this time but given how many homicides occur in the military with the common motive of domestic violence and/or life insurance, the Katherine Morris case deserves a second look.

Three families have asked for similar law changes for victims of domestic violence in the military since 2011. Representative Bruce Braley introduced the Holley Lynn James Act on behalf of Fort Bragg Lt. Holley Wimunc who was murdered by her Marine husband John Wimunc in 2008. The bill was advocating for the removal of the Commander and the Chain of Command from the investigation and adjudication of felony crimes like domestic violence because of their inexperience with the modus operandi of offenders. Unfortunately the bill was never even considered and this bill may have had the power to prevent what happened to Katherine Morris, Michelle Miller, and Karlyn Ramirez. Michelle Miller’s family believes she was targeted by an Army recruiter at her Rockville, Maryland high school and became the victim of domestic violence and homicide, despite the Army’s ruling of a double suicide. As a result, Michelle’s family is advocating for Michelle’s Law, which is an effort to encourage Congress to pass a law that would try military abuse and murder cases in civilian court. Katherine’s family is currently advocating for the Katherine Morris Military Spouse Protection Act. All of these law proposals ask that the Chain of Command be removed from the investigation and adjudication of felony crimes because of their inexperience at handling these complex cases. Similar bills have also been introduced to Congress to include the Sexual Assault Training, Oversight, and Prevention Act and the Military Justice Improvement Act. The military needs experienced investigators to get to the bottom of the truth in an effort to prevent crime and save lives.

In the News:

Family of Katherine Morris wants Dept. of Justice to investigate death. -WMAR-2 News (August 10, 2015)

Related Links:
For Kathy’s Sake, Inc.
Obituary: Katherine Sarah “Kat” Morris
U.Md. student found dead in car near Arundel Mills Mall
Questions abound after student death
Fort Bragg soldier accused of fraud after wife’s suicide
Army investigates allegation soldier drove UMd. student to suicide
Retired officers to give Anne Arundel County cold cases new life
Retired detectives to review 2012 suicide near Arundel Mills
Police reopen probe of Rev. Morris’ daughter’s death
Police Launch Independent Review Into UMD Student’s Suicide Death
Police re-open ‘suicide’ case of wife who was heartbroken after she discovered ‘soldier husband only wed her for Army benefits and was sleeping with other women’
Mother of apparent suicide seeks answers
Marguerite Morris v. Prudential Insurance Company of America (2013)
NAACP seeks federal probe of 2012 death in Hanover
Anne Arundel County mom not convinced her daughter committed suicide, calls for DOJ investigation
Morris v. Goodwin (2014)
Mother’s Search for Answers in Daughter’s Death Leads to Shelter Closure
Anne Arundel Police Response to Freedom of Information Request
Mother seeks emails in daughter’s death investigation
When Katherine Morris, 22, died suddenly, police ruled it suicide, but her mother continues to investigate
Marguerite R. Morris, Personal Representative of the Estate of Katherine Sarah Morris v. Isaac Jerome Goodwin (2016)
Fort Bragg Army Nurse Lt Holley Wimunc Murdered by Marine Husband the Day After She Announced Divorce, John Wimunc Sentenced to Life in Prison (2008)
Evidence Reveals Army Reserve Recruiter Adam Arndt Murdered High School Student Michelle Miller & Then Killed Self, Army Investigators Claim Double Suicide (2013)
Army Pfc Karlyn Ramirez Found Shot to Death in Home, Army Sgt Maliek Kearney & Army Veteran Dolores Delgado Charged with Across State Lines Murder, Feds Prosecuting (2015)
Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance is a Common Motive for Murder
Family of Katherine Morris wants Dept. of Justice to investigate death
Army Specialist Isaac Goodwin allegedly marries for money, and his wife commits suicide
WMAR-2 News: Family of Katherine Morris wants Dept. of Justice to investigate death (August 10, 2015)

Army Sgt. Amanda Sheldon’s Mom Speaks Out on Suicide; Family Hopes to Inspire Military-Wide Change (October 14, 2010)

The family of Sgt. Amanda Sheldon hopes her death may spark change. The 2004 Belding graduate’s body will return to West Michigan on Thursday night, about one week after Sheldon took her own life while serving at a Fort Bragg, N.C., military base. -WOOD TV8 (October 14, 2010)

“Just like any other soldier, whether she died in combat or some other way, she’s still a fallen soldier. She served her country and she served it well.” -Renee Orcatt (Amanda Sheldon’s mom)

Army Sgt. Amanda Sheldon, 24, took her own life while stationed with the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. Sgt. Sheldon was found unresponsive at her off-post home in Fayetteville and was pronounced dead at the local hospital on October 7, 2010. Sgt. Sheldon was attached to the 18th Fires Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. She joined the Army in October 2005 and was assigned to Fort Bragg in February 2010. The family of Sgt. Amanda Sheldon hopes the circumstances surrounding her untimely death will spark military-wide change. In 2010, the Department of Defense was concerned about the increase in active duty suicides and since then the numbers have only increased. CNN reported the suicide rates among active-duty Marines and the Navy are at a 10-year high on January 28, 2019. Task and Purpose reported Army suicides reached a five-year high on January 31, 2019. Military.com reported Active-Duty military suicides are at Record Highs in 2018.

Related Links:
Sgt Amanda Ann “Mandy” Sheldon | Find a Grave
Grand Rapids soldier Sgt. Amanda Sheldon, 24, dies in N.C. hospital
Female soldier dies at Fayetteville hospital
Police, family say Belding area soldier took her own life
Soldier’s mom speaks out on suicide (YouTube)
Ada family of soldier who died off-base in North Carolina says death was not suspicious
The family of Sgt. Amanda Sheldon hopes her death may spark change
Army Sgt. Amanda Sheldon’s Mom Speaks Out on Suicide; Family Hopes to Inspire Military-Wide Change (October 14, 2010)
The Challenge and the Promise: Strengthening the Force, Preventing Suicide and Saving Lives (2011)
Air Force TSgt. Jennifer Norris Testified Before the House Armed Services Committee in Washington DC (January 23, 2013)
Retired Marine Stephanie Schroeder Fights for Servicemember’s Rights at the United Nation’s Geneva Conventions (November 11, 2014)
Ali and Josh Hobson: Sexual Assault and Retaliation in the US Air Force (2015)
62 Percent of Military Sex Assault Reports Result in Retaliation (2015)
Highlights of Lt Col Teresa James, Army National Guard, Military Sexual Assault and Retaliation Case (2015)
Heath Phillips, Active Duty Military & Veterans Advocate, a Voice for Male Victims of Crime (2016)
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members (2016)
What Happens When a Rape is Reported in the Military? (2017)
How do we stop the retaliation from happening so victims of crimes in the military feel safe to report? (2017)
Dignified transfer performed for Fort Carson soldier who died on post (2018)
Failing Private Burnham: How the Army Did Not Protect a Minnesota Soldier after a Sexual Assault (2018)
Tribute to a Fallen Soldier | Amanda Sheldon
In Loving Memory of Amanda Ann Sheldon | Facebook

Military Rape Survivor Army Sgt. Amanda Sheldon Died by Suicide After Suffering With Depression; Family Hopes Her Death May Spark Change (October 7, 2010)

Sgt Amanda Sheldon, US Army (2010)

Sgt. Amanda Sheldon, U.S. Army

Army Sgt. Amanda Sheldon, 24, took her own life while stationed with the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. Sgt. Sheldon was found unresponsive at her off-post home in Fayetteville and was pronounced dead at the local hospital on October 7, 2010. Sgt. Sheldon’s mom, Renee Orcatt, went public with Amanda’s story in an effort to raise awareness, change policy, and save lives. Renee told the local media that Amanda was a victim of rape in the military at the hands of a superior officer. Amanda reported the crime to the Army and informed them she had been drugged and raped. As a result, the suspect was criminally convicted and discharged from the Army. Initially, Amanda sought help from military counselors and the family reported that she was getting better, yet still struggled with depression. Amanda wanted to deal with it and move on to serve her country as she had originally intended to do.

Unfortunately, according to Renee, this wasn’t the last time Amanda would have to confront her past while serving in the Army. When Amanda was up for promotion, she was asked why she was going to counseling. She would go on to get her promotion, but this line of questioning was something she never wanted to experience again. After making the realization that her past and seeking help was not confidential, counseling was out of the question in her future if she wanted to preserve her career. Sgt. Sheldon felt judged for seeking treatment for military sexual trauma. Her mom reported that Amanda recognized she needed counseling again and was planning on getting out of the military. When she died, she was serving out her final year of enlistment, had plans to go to college, and wanted to start a new life outside the military, with her new love. But her unit got tasked with a deployment to Afghanistan and she set about making plans to go to Afghanistan with her unit before she was discharged from the Army.

Amanda would learn that in order to accomplish this, she would need to re-enlist for two more years. Amanda didn’t want to stay in for two more years and made the devastating decision to stay back. She felt like no matter what decision she made, she was letting someone down. Renee observed that Amanda never came to grips with this decision and entered into depression. Amanda’s mom begged her to get counseling but to Amanda that was no longer an option. Sgt. Sheldon was attached to the 18th Fires Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg. She joined the Army in October 2005 and was assigned to Fort Bragg in February 2010. The family of Sgt. Amanda Sheldon hopes the circumstances surrounding her untimely death will spark military-wide change. In 2010, the Department of Defense was concerned about the increase in active duty suicides and since then the number of suicides in the military has increased.

Editor’s Note: CNN reported the suicide rates among active-duty Marines and the Navy are at a 10-year high on January 28, 2019. Task and Purpose reported Army suicides reached a five-year high on January 31, 2019. Military.com reported Active-Duty military suicides are at Record Highs in 2018. 

“Just like any other soldier, whether she died in combat or some other way, she’s still a fallen soldier. She served her country and she served it well.” -Renee Orcatt (Amanda Sheldon’s mom)

Source: Soldier’s Mom speaks out on suicide, WOOD TV8 (October 14, 2010)

The family of Sgt. Amanda Sheldon hopes her death may spark change. The 2004 Belding graduate’s body will return to West Michigan on Thursday night, about one week after Sheldon took her own life while serving at a Fort Bragg, N.C., military base. -WOOD TV8 (October 14, 2010)

Related Links:
Sgt Amanda Ann “Mandy” Sheldon | Find a Grave
Grand Rapids soldier Sgt. Amanda Sheldon, 24, dies in N.C. hospital
Female soldier dies at Fayetteville hospital
Police, family say Belding area soldier took her own life
Soldier’s mom speaks out on suicide (YouTube)
Ada family of soldier who died off-base in North Carolina says death was not suspicious
The family of Sgt. Amanda Sheldon hopes her death may spark change
Army Sgt. Amanda Sheldon’s Mom Speaks Out on Suicide; Family Hopes to Inspire Military-Wide Change (October 14, 2010)
The Challenge and the Promise: Strengthening the Force, Preventing Suicide and Saving Lives (2011)
Air Force TSgt. Jennifer Norris Testified Before the House Armed Services Committee in Washington DC (January 23, 2013)
Retired Marine Stephanie Schroeder Fights for Servicemember’s Rights at the United Nation’s Geneva Conventions (November 11, 2014)
Ali and Josh Hobson: Sexual Assault and Retaliation in the US Air Force (2015)
62 Percent of Military Sex Assault Reports Result in Retaliation (2015)
Highlights of Lt Col Teresa James, Army National Guard, Military Sexual Assault and Retaliation Case (2015)
Heath Phillips, Active Duty Military & Veterans Advocate, a Voice for Male Victims of Crime (2016)
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members (2016)
What Happens When a Rape is Reported in the Military? (2017)
How do we stop the retaliation from happening so victims of crimes in the military feel safe to report? (2017)
Dignified transfer performed for Fort Carson soldier who died on post (2018)
Failing Private Burnham: How the Army Did Not Protect a Minnesota Soldier after a Sexual Assault (2018)
Tribute to a Fallen Soldier | Amanda Sheldon
In Loving Memory of Amanda Ann Sheldon | Facebook

Army Spc. Morganne McBeth Killed by Fellow Soldier in Iraq; Spc. Nicholas Bailey Sentenced to Nine Months in Prison (July 1, 2010)

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Spc. Morganne McBeth, U.S. Army

Army Spc. Morganne McBeth, 19, died July 2, 2010 of wounds sustained on July 1. This was considered a non combat death in Iraq and her death was ruled a homicide. Morganne was supporting Operation Iraqi Freedom on behalf of the 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. McBeth was stabbed by a fellow Army soldier Specialist Nicholas Bailey. According to court testimony, Bailey stabbed Morganne McBeth while ‘horsing around’ in a tent in Iraq. Nicholas Bailey was sentenced to nine months in prison, demoted to private, and given a bad conduct discharge.

“Involuntary manslaughter can be committed in one of two ways,” an 82nd Airborne official said in an e-mail. “…through culpable negligence or by causing a death while committing or attempting to commit an offense directly affecting the person, other than burglary, sodomy, rape, robbery, or aggravated arson. Note that these are the five offenses covered in the felony murder rule. As the manual for court martials points out, culpable negligence is a degree of carelessness greater than simple negligence. It is a negligent act or omission which is accompanied by a culpable disregard for the foreseeable consequences to others of that act or omission.” -Army Times

Related Links:
DOD Identifies Army Casualty
Army Spc. Morganne M. McBeth
Army Spc. Morganne McBeth | Military Wall of Honor Facebook
Morganne Marie McBeth, Specialist, United States Army
82nd Airborne combat medic dies in Iraq
Fredericksburg Service Woman Dies in Iraq
Army reported Va. medic’s death in Iraq as accidental, then self-inflicted, now murder
Soldier’s Death Called Murder
Army: 2 soldiers charged in medic’s death in Iraq
Two Ft. Bragg Soldiers Charged in the July 2, 2010 Death of Spc. Morganne McBeth in Iraq (Update)
2 Bragg soldiers charged in stabbing of spc. (Army Times)
Witness: Paratrooper tired of lying to cover up medic’s death
Stepmother of Slain Female Soldier Asks Court to Show Leniency
Guilty plea in death of local medic
Soldier pleads guilty in McBeth’s death
Soldier gets 9 months for stabbing death
Bragg soldier gets nine months in prison for medic’s death
Hiding Military Sexual Trauma
Military women die in suspicious non-combat events. Families ask: Why?
No End in Sight for a Family’s Agonizing Guessing Game
Violent Crime, Non Combat Death and Suicide at Fort Bragg, North Carolina (US Army)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the U.S. Military (Iraq)
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members