An Open Letter to Congress Regarding the Investigations of the National Guard Recruiting Assistance Program (G-RAP)

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Guard Recruiting and Assistance Program (G-RAP)

Dear Congress,

Both the New York Times and the Washington Times are reporting that the Army’s investigation of National Guard soldiers and veterans who participated in the Guard Recruiting Assistance Program (G-RAP) has gone far and wide of the intention. Thousands of Guard troops have had their military and civilian careers destroyed over the Army’s accusations and questionable investigations.

They are questionable because of the constitutionality of the Army serving as a police force to investigate citizen soldiers. They are questionable because CID’s tactics do not conform to policy. They are questionable, because in five years of investigations and an estimated $40 million spent by CID, not even a fraction of the alleged fraud has been found. Senator Claire McCaskill took, at face value, Gen Quantock’s testimony that $100 million was lost to G-RAP fraud. Senator McCaskill set loose the largest military criminal investigation in history.

I am just a citizen volunteer: not military, not an attorney, who did background research for a friend caught in this trap. In the process I amassed thousands of pages of documentation that the investigations are unjust, and possibly illegal – That the premise of massive fraud is wrong and that the witch hunt continues only to prove the Army’s wild exaggerations.

G-RAP is a dark and complicated story and one that needs attention. Shining a spotlight on this can only happen in Congress.

I would welcome an opportunity to share what I have found.

Sincerely,

Liz Ullman

Related Links:
Defend Our Protectors
Stop G-RAP Injustice on Facebook
The Conspiracy Behind the G-RAP War on American Soldiers
If You Look at the Dollars, Guard Recruiting Assistance Program Investigations Make No Sense
Top Ten Problems with the National Guard Recruiting Assistance Program (G-RAP) Investigations

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USMCFormer Marine Sentenced to Federal Prison

A former Marine staff sergeant who accepted $150,000 from military contractors while deployed in Iraq was sentenced Friday to more than five years in federal prison.

Gilbert Mendez, 37, from Camp Lejeune, N.C., pleaded guilty last December to conspiracy to defraud the United States.

In handing down the 63-month sentence, U.S. District Judge Janis Sammartino told Mendez that he “breached his honor and his integrity” and that his conduct impacted not only the Marine Corps but every U.S. taxpayer.

Read more: http://oceanside-camppendleton.patch.com/groups/police-and-fire/p/former-marine-sentenced-to-federal-prison_935ce177

Army Veteran Patricia MacCallum Murdered Husband Christopher for the Children, Social Security Benefits, and Life Insurance; Sentenced to Fifty Years in Oregon Prison (2012)

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Christopher MacCallum (2012)

Christopher MacCallum was discovered dead at the bottom of a cliff in Oregon on November 20, 2012. Christopher was reported missing by his wife Patricia and her step-sister after disappearing while they were camping at the Applegate River campsite. Investigators could find no one who had motive to harm Christopher so they started digging into his relationship with Patricia. Christopher and Patricia met in 2008. Patricia joined the Army in January 2011 and five months later in December 2011, she was medically discharged. She moved back to Oregon with the children and left Christopher behind; he was waiting until the lease on their San Antonio, Texas apartment was up. It turns out they separated and reconciled a couple times throughout the course of their relationship. Christopher moved back in with Patricia again in September 2012 and she immediately began plotting his murder with her step-sister. Christopher was dead the next month. From all accounts, Christopher was a good man who loved his children and simply wanted to be with them.

Eventually Patricia MacCallum admitted to shooting Christopher multiple times while he lay asleep in his tent. Patricia’s step-sister Amber Lubbers admitted to assisting with the cover-up of the crime. Together they dumped his body off a cliff and told police that he had gone missing. Prosecutors revealed that the motive for the crime was the custody of the children, social security benefits, and life insurance. Patricia admitted to intentionally getting her husband drunk so that once he passed out, she could kill him when he was most defenseless. Christopher’s father Mike MacCallum shared that he believes that Christopher wanted to save the marriage to prevent the kids from going through a divorce and this desire turned out to be a fatal error. Patricia MacCallum was found guilty and sentenced to 50 years in prison. Amber Lubbers was charged as an accessory after the fact, found guilty, and sentenced to 16 months in prison. She served about half her sentence and was released early because of good behavior.

Related Links:
Obituary: Michael Christopher MacCallum
MacCallum’s Mother Speaks Out; Donations Accepted for Children
Oregon woman to be tried for husband’s murder
Prosecution: MacCallum did it for ‘money, kids and insurance’
Medford woman guilty of murder
Jury finds MacCallum guilty of murdering her husband
The Trial of Patricia MacCallum Convicted of Murdering her Husband, Michael Christopher MacCallum
Woman admits helping cover up murder
Woman sentenced as accomplice in camping trip killing of Medford man
Accomplice in Siskiyou County murder is freed early
Patricia MacCallum, Christopher MacCallum: ‘Snapped’ Spotlights Applegate Creek Campsite Murder of Oregon Husband Found Dead at Bottom of Cliff
Life Insurance Fraud is a Common Motive for Murder in the Military


Sheriffs show up to a campsite where Patricia MacCallum’s husband went missing. -Oxygen Media

Army Spouse Katherine Morris Found Dead in Car Near Mall; Cause of Death Initially Ruled Suicide But Further Investigation Suggests Homicide Motivated by Insurance Fraud (2012)

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Katherine Morris

Katherine Morris, 22, was found dead in her car near the Arundel Mills Mall in Maryland on May 6, 2012. Katherine was a University of Maryland student and married to Army spouse, Isaac Goodwin, who was stationed at Fort Bragg in North Carolina. According to a website dedicated to Katherine Morris, she died from carbon monoxide poisoning from charcoal grills lit in her car. Katherine’s family questioned the ruling of suicide by the Army and the Anne Arundel County police department immediately and were eventually successful at getting some retired civilian detectives to look into their suspicions of homicide motivated by life insurance fraud. Interestingly, Anne Arundel County police department also had jurisdiction of the homicide investigation of Army soldier Karlyn Ramirez, who was murdered in 2015. Karlyn’s husband Maliek Kearney and his new girlfriend Doris Delgado face federal murder charges. Karlyn’s homicide is similar in motive to the theories Katherine’s family has about her suspicious death. Karlyn and Katherine both appear to have been targeted and became the victims of domestic violence and/or life insurance fraud. The true motivation behind the Karlyn Ramirez and Katherine Morris deaths is unknown at this time but given how many homicides occur in the military with the common motive of domestic violence and/or life insurance, the Katherine Morris case deserves a second look.

Three families have asked for similar law changes for victims of domestic violence in the military since 2011. Representative Bruce Braley introduced the Holley Lynn James Act on behalf of Fort Bragg Lt. Holley Wimunc who was murdered by her Marine husband John Wimunc in 2008. The bill was advocating for the removal of the Commander and the Chain of Command from the investigation and adjudication of felony crimes like domestic violence because of their inexperience with the modus operandi of offenders. Unfortunately the bill was never even considered and this bill may have had the power to prevent what happened to Katherine Morris, Michelle Miller, and Karlyn Ramirez. Michelle Miller’s family believes she was targeted by an Army recruiter at her Rockville, Maryland high school and became the victim of domestic violence and homicide, despite the Army’s ruling of a double suicide. As a result, Michelle’s family is advocating for Michelle’s Law, which is an effort to encourage Congress to pass a law that would try military abuse and murder cases in civilian court. Katherine’s family is currently advocating for the Katherine Morris Military Spouse Protection Act. All of these law proposals ask that the Chain of Command be removed from the investigation and adjudication of felony crimes because of their inexperience at handling these complex cases. Similar bills have also been introduced to Congress to include the Sexual Assault Training, Oversight, and Prevention Act and the Military Justice Improvement Act. The military needs experienced investigators to get to the bottom of the truth in an effort to prevent crime and save lives.

Related Links:
For Kathy’s Sake, Inc.
Obituary: Katherine Sarah “Kat” Morris
U.Md. student found dead in car near Arundel Mills Mall
Questions abound after student death
Fort Bragg soldier accused of fraud after wife’s suicide
Army investigates allegation soldier drove UMd. student to suicide
Retired officers to give Anne Arundel County cold cases new life
Retired detectives to review 2012 suicide near Arundel Mills
Police reopen probe of Rev. Morris’ daughter’s death
Police Launch Independent Review Into UMD Student’s Suicide Death
Police re-open ‘suicide’ case of wife who was heartbroken after she discovered ‘soldier husband only wed her for Army benefits and was sleeping with other women’
Mother of apparent suicide seeks answers
Marguerite Morris v. Prudential Insurance Company of America (2013)
NAACP seeks federal probe of 2012 death in Hanover
Anne Arundel County mom not convinced her daughter committed suicide, calls for DOJ investigation
Morris v. Goodwin (2014)
Mother’s Search for Answers in Daughter’s Death Leads to Shelter Closure
Anne Arundel Police Response to Freedom of Information Request
Mother seeks emails in daughter’s death investigation
When Katherine Morris, 22, died suddenly, police ruled it suicide, but her mother continues to investigate
Marguerite R. Morris, Personal Representative of the Estate of Katherine Sarah Morris v. Isaac Jerome Goodwin (2016)
Fort Bragg Army Nurse Lt Holley Wimunc Murdered by Marine Husband the Day After She Announced Divorce, John Wimunc Sentenced to Life in Prison (2008)
Evidence Reveals Army Reserve Recruiter Adam Arndt Murdered High School Student Michelle Miller & Then Killed Self, Army Investigators Claim Double Suicide (2013)
Army Pfc Karlyn Ramirez Found Shot to Death in Home, Army Sgt Maliek Kearney & Army Veteran Dolores Delgado Charged with Across State Lines Murder, Feds Prosecuting (2015)
Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance is a Common Motive for Murder
Family of Katherine Morris wants Dept. of Justice to investigate death
Army Specialist Isaac Goodwin allegedly marries for money, and his wife commits suicide

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US ArmyU.S. soldiers accused of Russian-bride scam

WILMINGTON, N.C. — Sgt. Jason Hawk and his bride met for the first time when he picked her up at a bus stop near his Army base a day before their wedding. Prosecutors say the speedy romance was echoed by a fast honeymoon: Ayna Ivanova returned to New York soon after.

Two other paratroopers who served with Hawk and three women now each face up to five years in federal prison when sentenced for their roles in what authorities say was a marriage scheme that aimed to garner U.S. citizenship for Russian brides and coveted housing allowances for junior enlisted men. Prosecutors said the marriages cost the government at least $200,000 in wages and benefits.

Read more: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/33491464/ns/us_news-military/t/us-soldiers-accused-russian-bride-scam/

Air Force Retiree Michael Giles Shot in Head and Buried in Backyard of Texas Home; Kwaneta Harris Sentenced to 50 Years in Prison (2006)

Air Force Retiree Michael Giles, 46, of Garland, Texas disappeared on July 4, 2006. He was supposed to attend a Fourth of July event with his family but he never showed up. He texted his sister informing her he was staying home. On October 12, 2007, Veterans Affairs agents contacted a detective in Garland because they were concerned about the missing veteran, who the same month he went missing, stopped making payments on his VA home loan which wasn’t like him. VA agents were investigating his foreclosure because he was never late and sometime made double payments but they were unable to get ahold of him since he stopped making payments one year earlier. The VA agents noticed a concrete slab of cement in the backyard that looked random, it had no useful purpose. The detective who was called to investigate the circumstances immediately suspected the concrete slab was a grave. They learned the current tenant didn’t know Michael Giles and that he was renting from Kwaneta Harris, who lived in Detroit, Michigan.

Kwaneta Harris met Michael Giles in England where both of them lived. Kwaneta was married to an Air Force service member and they were in the middle of a divorce when she met Michael Giles. Giles was also stationed in England with the Air Force where he worked on overhauling engines for helicopters. He was Kwaneta’s husband’s supervisor and felt for her because she didn’t have a place to live after her husband kicked her out. The pair quickly became friends and eventually began a romantic relationship. In 1996, Kwaneta Harris moved back to Detroit, Michigan and Michael Giles finished up a twenty year career and retired from the Air Force. He bought a home in Garland, Texas and it wasn’t until 2002 that he began having conversations with Kwaneta again. Michael was excited about his new life and new job and between his Air Force pension and his salary, he did well. He began a long distance relationship with Kwaneta Harris again and she began flying back and forth between Michigan and Texas. Kwaneta was also dating Deandre Knight in Michigan at the same time.

After VA agents contacted detectives, they initiated a search of the backyard with a cadaver dog. The dog hit on the area where the random concrete slab was placed. They needed a warrant but they needed more evidence before they could begin digging in Michael’s backyard. They contacted Michael’s family and learned they had not seen him since July 2006, although they didn’t report him missing because he continued to text them to let them know he was okay but needed some time to himself. This was not like Michael and the family was concerned but they were lead to believe that he was still alive when they received the texts so they never filed a missing person’s report. When detectives began digging deeper into Michael’s life, they learned that Kwaneta Harris had systematically drained all of Michael’s bank accounts and liquidated his assets. Kwaneta Harris stole $200,000 from Michael since the time of his disappearance. As a result of this new information, investigators were able to search the backyard and recovered Michael’s body underneath the concrete slab. His badly decomposed body was found with a bullet in his head. Kwaneta Harris was arrested and extradited to Texas.

In a search of Kwaneta’s home in Michigan, investigators discovered all of Michael Gile’s personal belongings including his personal information, bank account passwords, cell phone, and official documents. Kwaneta was charged with murder. In the middle of the trial, Kwaneta plead guilty and was sentenced to fifty years in prison. In September 2015, Kwaneta Harris received a court order reducing her sentence from 50 years to 8 years, meaning she would be eligible for parole immediately. But as it turns out this court order was not real because she forged the judge’s signature. This was one more con in a long history of evil doing and conniving. Kwaneta’s husband, Deandre Knight, was also arrested for his role in the fraud. He wasn’t involved in the murder but he was involved in the elaborate fraud schemes to steal money and assets from Michael Giles. If not for the VA agents caring about the Air Force veteran who stopped making his VA home loan payments all of a sudden, this case may never have been solved. The VA home loan agents went above and beyond unlike a regular bank would have and reported their suspicions about the sudden disappearance of the homeowner Air Force retiree Michael Giles.

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Kwaneta Harris, Michigan

Kwaneta Yatrice Harris, a licensed nurse, shot Michael Giles, her on-again, off-again lover of a decade, in the back of the head in 2006. She then cooked up an elaborate ploy to cover up the killing of Giles, a military retiree who lived in Garland. Harris hired someone to dig Giles’ grave under the ruse that she was installing a pond, then got a man to pour a 3-by-15-foot concrete slab on top. She posed as Giles in emails and texts, telling his family he was in New Mexico and needed some time away. Prosecutors say she even had a new boyfriend pretend to be Giles, dressed up in bandages after a supposed car accident, so she could gain access to Giles’ financial accounts. Authorities excavated Giles’ body from his own backyard in 2007. –Dallas News

Related Links:
Obituary: Michael Allen Giles
Missing Garland man found buried in backyard
Man missing since 2006 found buried in his back yard, police say
Woman accused of killing, burying man
Murder trial begins for woman accused of shooting man, burying him under cement in backyard of Garland home
Woman pleads guilty in middle of murder trial, gets 50 years
Detroit woman gets 50 years over Texas death
Detroit woman gets 50 years in Texas for shooting, burying, stealing from boyfriend
Officials: Murderer forged paperwork to get out of jail
Murderer forged paperwork to get out of jail
Killer who had lover buried in backyard tried to flee prison by forging Dallas judge’s signature
Jailed for murder until at least 2033, woman ‘almost got out’ before fake court order was detected
Pandora’s Box: Unleashing Evil “Bait and Kill”
Fatal Attraction: Texas Tragedy
Snapped Sneak Peek 2011: Kwaneta Harris
Snapped: Sneak Peek – Kwaneta Harris (Season 20, Episode 11) | Oxygen
Snapped: Kwaneta Harris
Snapped: After The Verdict – Kwaneta Harris (Season 20, Episode 5) | Oxygen
Snapped: Bonus Clip – Trying To Frame Me (Season 20, Episode 11) | Oxygen
Snapped: Bonus Clip – It All Unraveled (Season 20, Episode 11) | Oxygen


Snapped: After The Verdict – Kwaneta Harris | Oxygen

Ft Carson Army Soldier Nolly Depadua Killed Air Force Spouse Lourdes Riddle to Silence Sextortion Threats; Sentenced to 14 Years, Out in 7 (1985)

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Nolly Depadua, US Army

Investigation Discovery featured back to back episodes of Homicide Hunter with Lt. Joe Kenda. Kenda is a retired detective from the Colorado Springs Police Department. Colorado Springs is also the home of US Army base Fort Carson and Peterson Air Force Base. As a result, Lt. Kenda worked closely with investigating authorities at both bases throughout the years when one of his murder cases involved a member of the military or their dependents. If a crime against a military member or their dependents occurred off-base within the jurisdiction of Colorado Springs, Lt. Joe Kenda had the legal authority to investigate the strangling death of an Air Force wife found in the jurisdiction of Colorado Springs.

Construction workers found an abandoned car that had been set on fire on their property on March 26, 1985. The scene looked suspicious so they contacted the police to investigate the situation. The police found Air Force spouse Lourdes Riddle strangled to death in the trunk of her own car. Lt. Joe Kenda was called to the scene to investigate the crime further and determined that whoever killed Lourdes also tried to cover up their crime. They found that an accelerant (gasoline) was used to burn the car and a brick was on the driver’s side floor of the car (as if it was used to hold down the gas pedal). As Kenda was processing the crime scene, two Air Force Office of Special Investigations (AFOSI) personnel showed up and claimed they were taking charge of the investigation. They informed Kenda they had the husband, TSgt Mark Riddle, who worked at NORAD, Cheyenne Mountain, in custody on Peterson AFB.

Kenda’s response to the Air Force Office of Special Investigations personnel was priceless and proves that he truly is a fierce detective that all law enforcement should emulate. He was not intimidated by the feds in the least bit when the crime occurred in his jurisdiction. He shared that even it was their house, how dare they walk into his crime scene. Kenda was absolutely shocked when they shared they had enlisted soldier, Mark Riddle, in their office at Peterson AFB. Their attitude was that it was obvious who did it because in most cases it was the husband or boyfriend. When in fact, Kenda was disappointed that they may have tainted the case by initiating an ‘immediate arrest’. He was afraid that this outside agency, who had no jurisdiction, had advised Mark Riddle of his rights and he would want a lawyer now. His guilt was not obvious to Kenda who did not automatically assume that the husband committed the crime. He simply wanted to talk to him, not accuse him. Kenda felt that their actions may prevent him from doing an interview which could really damage the case. Kenda admitted to making mistakes in his lifetime but he also shared that he gets really upset when someone else makes them for him. If all investigators operated like Kenda and made assumptions based on fact finding, we could better protect the due process rights of individuals.

Kenda gains access to Mark Riddle and learns that Lourdes is a 31 year old from the Philliphines who has been married to him for nine years. There was in fact trouble in paradise and Mark admitted that his wife had been spending time with and maybe even sleeping with other men. They were not happily married. He claimed he was home the night of the murder and had no alibi. Mark asked for a polygraph test to prove his innocence and passed it, then let the investigators search his home. Although adultery is a motive for murder, Kenda determined that Mark Riddle was honest, credible, and was no longer considered a suspect. This case was not a sex crime but it was a personal and angry crime as evidenced by the ligature strangulation. Kenda felt that this person wanted to punish her and wanted to feel her die. This person was deemed the “Pantyhose Strangler” in the media. After talking to Lourdes family, Kenda learned that Lourdes was threatened by more then one person. Kenda wasn’t sure if she was a target because of Mark’s work at a secret military base or if it was because of her own secret life.

The Air Force couple lived on Peterson AFB. Kenda learned that Lourdes went to night clubs that soldiers frequented. She was into the nightlife, partying, and dancing. Her neighbors reported that she was in and out of the house all the time, usually dressed up with high heels, short skirts and make-up. During Kenda’s investigation into the circumstances of Lourdes secret life, rumors began to circulate at the enlisted men’s club on Fort Carson that she was extorting Army soldiers. In the meantime because of media coverage, an eye witness came forward with a description of a suspect that was found near the scene of the crime that night. He was a black male about 6’8. Kenda asked those who frequented the enlisted club on base if she was dating anyone matching the description. He learned that she only dated Phillipino men and wouldn’t give any other guy the time of day. The rumor was that she draws soldiers in like a Venis flytrap. She specifically sought out Phillipino soldiers. She would have a relationship with them, claim that she was pregnant, and threaten to go to their military Commander if they did not give her money for an abortion.

Lt. Kenda learned of blackmail accusations involving Nolly Depadua, a Phillipino soldier stationed at Fort Carson. Nolly had a friend named Brian Hawkins, also a Fort Carson soldier, who matched the description of the suspect described near the scene of the crime the night Lourdes was murdered. Kenda spoke to Brian with the approach that the facts would give him a theory. Initially Hawkins denied any involvement but Kenda believed that he was lying based on his body language during the interview. He requested he undergo a polygraph test and Hawkins failed miserably. When confronted with the results, Hawkins begins to cry. Hawkins told Kenda that Lourdes wanted money from Nolly Depadua. She claimed she was pregnant and was going to contact the Commander if he didn’t give her money. Nolly was concerned that his family would be ashamed of him if he got kicked out of the military. Nolly strangled Lourdes with the pantyhose.

Kenda arrested Nolly and learned from him that they had sex, and she wanted $1000 for an abortion. According to Nolly, Lourdes took his Army dress uniform, used it as ransom, and threatened to burn it if he didn’t give her the money. His career and that uniform meant everything to him. The night of the murder, Nolly asked Lourdes to meet him and give him back his uniform. Lourdes showed up without the uniform. He snapped and strangled her to death in an effort to solve his extortion problems and save his career. Nolly elicits the help of Brian to help him get rid of the body. Unlike in the movies, the car did not explode in a ball of flames like the pair was expecting. The evidence at the scene of the crime was mostly unharmed. According to Kenda, both of the soldiers appeared to show remorse for the crime. Although Lourdes Riddle was a participant in her own death and her behavior caused this reaction, she did not deserve to die. Nolly Depadua made a decision to take a life and you can’t do that. Due to the circumstances surrounding the homicide, he was found guilty of second degree murder and sentenced to fourteen years in prison. He was released after seven. Lt. Kenda ended the show with: “saying she got what she deserved is not fair.”

A couple issues come to mind when it comes to the way the military handles investigations of felony crimes. Why did the Air Force Office of Special Investigations want to take jurisdiction of this case? Why did they do an ‘immediate arrest’ instead of investigating the circumstances and basing their decisions on fact finding? Why don’t they realize that their actions actually hinder the thorough investigations of cases. Research does in fact support that most spouses are murdered by their significant others but we have this thing called due process in the civilian world. The way Kenda felt about OSI interfering and possibly damaging the case was legitimate. And Kenda approached the investigation of the case in the way that detectives should move forward. He simply wanted to talk to the spouse, not accuse of him of the crime. So far there was no evidence to prove that Mark Lourdes had committed the crime. The way the Air Force OSI handled this case is part of the reason that the military justice system is under fire. They have been accused of overreach to include not affording due process rights to both victims of crime and those accused of a crime. They have been accused of railroading military members with an iron fist and as Joe Kenda would say ‘draconian and ruthless’ tactics. They have been accused of making a victim fearful of coming forward if they were involved in a military crime, like adultery or drinking underage. Nolly Depadua is yet another example of a crime involving the motive of fear when someone threatens to go to a military commander.

This is the heart of the military justice system debate. A commander hears each person’s story and determines who is guilty and who is not guilty based on that evidence alone usually. Commanders make the decision whether to prosecute someone in the military. If felony cases were handled by prosecutors who understood the modus operandi of sociopaths, psychopaths, and predators, would our soldiers feel more comfortable reporting a crime without the fear of damaging or losing their own career. It’s a theme that comes up over and over in military cases and needs to be examined. Are soldiers hesitant to report crimes perpetrated against them to their Commander if they have engaged in illegal behavior of any kind to include drinking under age and adultery? If this is the case, we must remove this barrier so that our soldiers feel safe to report felony crimes perpetrated against them without fear of losing their careers because they committed a misdemeanor.

If Nolly had a safe place to report that Lourdes was extorting him despite the adultery issue, could we have prevented this murder? We don’t want our soldiers to feel like they have nowhere to turn if they are targeted by those who know how to manipulate unsuspecting Commanders. It’s important to recognize that both male and female soldiers can be targeted by male or female sociopaths and predators. Reporting crimes to your commander is currently a battle of whose story is more believable and what they feel or don’t feel like dealing with. Commanders hold the key to moving forward with a case or not in our current military justice system. Do they have the skills necessary to investigate and determine who should be prosecuted for crimes? Commanders may not realize that they could tip people off who need to be questioned simply by prematurely inquiring into something which creates an opportunity for collusion.

In the civilian world, you most likely will not lose your career for adultery. Yet in the military, adultery is treated like any other crime in the courts martial process and soldiers can and do lose their careers. It’s not worth a life when people feel that they have to take matters into their own hands to protect what should never been taken from them to begin with. This is why the reporting of felony crimes needs to be moved away from the Commander and to a trained investigator who can help the prosecution determine whether a crime has been committed or not. Prosecutors cannot win cases if the defendants are not afforded due process rights. And this is what gives civilian law enforcement the advantage because they are forced to work within a justice system that protects the constitutional rights of the accused. We want to respect those rights in our pursuit of justice because that is how we will get justice. We should ensure our soldiers that if a felony offense is committed against them that they can safely report the crime without the fear of losing their career.

Related Links:
Homicide Hunter ‘Secret Life’
Violent Crime, Suicide & Non Combat Death at Fort Carson, Colorado
Nowhere to Turn: Soldier Extorted by a Military Wife Ends in Murder
Army CID warns Soldiers to beware of ‘sextortion’ scams


After Lourdes Riddle in found strangled to death in the trunk of her car, homicide detective Joe Kenda follows the trail through a twisting maze of military and cultural secrets. Just what was Lourdes doing behind her husband’s back? -Investigation Discovery