Fort Hood Army Spc. Zachary Moore Found Unresponsive in Barracks on Deployment to Camp Hovey, South Korea; CID Ruled Suicide (2017)

SPC-Moore-235x300

Spc. Zachary Moore, US Army

Spc. Zachary Moore, 23, of Virginia Beach, Virginia, was found unresponsive August 1, 2017 in his barracks room at Camp Hovey in South Korea. Spc. Moore was transported to St. Mary’s Hospital and pronounced deceased on August 2, 2017. Spc. Moore entered active-duty military service in March 2014 as a signal support systems specialist. He was assigned to the 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood in Texas since July 2016. The circumstances surrounding the incident were investigated by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) and the cause of death was ruled a suicide.

*****************************************

Was Zachary Moore’s Death Preventable?

In May 2017, Fort Hood announced they were deploying 3,500 troops to South Korea over the summer. Twenty-three (23) year old Zachary Moore was one of the soldiers deployed to South Korea. With full knowledge of Zachary’s recent mental health issues, the Chain of Command gave him a mental health waiver against his will, and most likely against medical advice, so they could deploy him to South Korea.

In October 2016, Zachary had a mental health breakdown and went Absent without Leave (AWOL). After a successful intervention, Zachary was found and returned to the custody of his Chain of Command at Fort Hood. Zachary’s command then sent him to an emergency room where he was hospitalized and prescribed medication. After Zachary was discharged from the hospital, he continued to seek treatment for mental health issues. Six months later, Zachary was given a mental health waiver by his command to deploy to South Korea.

About a month after Zachary arrived at Camp Hovey in South Korea, his depression medication was changed. As a matter of fact, his depression medication was changed the day before he was found unresponsive in his barracks room. Zachary attempted to kill himself on August 1st, less than 24 hours after the medication change. It was Zachary who called his Command for help as there is no 911 on the base in South Korea. He was found unresponsive and finally transported to the hospital about 1 ½ to 2 hours later. He was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, listed as critical then stable, yet passed away on August 2, 2017.

Why did Zachary Moore go AWOL?

The Chain of Command contacted Jeanette to report Zachary hadn’t been seen since October 18, 2016. They also informed her they were not actively looking for him but would file AWOL status on October 20th. When asked if they filed a missing persons report, Jeanette claims they told her they did but she says she was lead to believe Zachary trashed his room, took his things, and left willingly. She immediately flew to Texas from Florida to find him.

Jeanette contacted the Killeen Police Department as soon as she got to Fort Hood and the local law enforcement found Zachary the same day she arrived. Over the phone, the Command told Jeanette they filed a missing persons report but she learned from the Killeen Police Department that they never did. The Killeen PD noticed recent activity on Facebook so they pinged Zach’s cell phone & found that he was in a remote area of a local state park.

Zachary attempted to flee initially but after negotiations, he surrendered and was returned to the police station where his mom was waiting. Jeanette could tell Zachary was mentally broken and he admitted to her that he wanted to hurt himself.  The Killeen PD found Zachary and he had a knife in his possession. Zachary was returned to the custody of his Chain of Command at Fort Hood. Shortly after Zachary informed his mom that his superiors told him to tell her to leave town and stop interfering.

Jeanette reports that Zachary never had any mental health issues prior to this and suspected that Zachary was “singled out by his command and harassed.”

Areas of Concern in Zachary Moore’s Case:

  • Zachary revealed he was harassed by his Chain of Command. For example, his leave papers to visit family before deploying were denied; he was denied permission to see the Fort Hood Inspector General officer; he was harassed during training exercises; he was given exhausting extra duties; and was accused of taking a radio which was later found on a military officer’s desk. Why was he denied the opportunity to speak to the IG officer?
  • Zachary was accused of trashing his room and taking his belongings when he went AWOL. Jeanette believes the circumstances surrounding the vandalism of his room and the theft of his property could be evidence of harassment.
  • During mental health treatment, Zachary was facing the consequences of going AWOL; Zachary was accused of trashing his own room; and Zachary was accused of stealing a secure radio? What are the additional mental health impacts of the way the Chain of Command uses the military justice system?
  • The circumstances of the mental health waiver and the justifications for sending Zachary to South Korea while he was undergoing treatment for mental health issues and medication management should be investigated.
  • The effects of the medication change in South Korea should be investigated. Is Command aware that some medications can cause serious negative reactions? (Some depression medication causes suicidal ideation.) Who monitors serious medication changes in deployed locations? Is it safe to deploy soldiers in the early phases of medication management for mental health issues?
  • Finally, the delay in the Command’s response to Zachary’s call for help in South Korea should be investigated. Why did it take so long to respond to Zachary and why did it take so long to get Zachary to the hospital? Did anyone attempt to administer help while waiting for the ambulance?
  • If the Command was the cause of the mental health break, where was Zachary supposed to turn? How do we hold the Chain of Command accountable? How do we prevent the Chain of Command from retaliating and using the military justice system or non judicial punishment as a weapon? What was the role of the Commander? What was the role of the Fort Hood Inspector General? How can we prevent a young soldier from feeling like the only way out of their situation is AWOL or suicide? How could we have prevented Zachary’s death?
  • Soldiers have come forward, given their stories to the family and have offered to testify about what Zachary was put through which may explain why he died. Were these soldiers questioned?

Source: Jeanette Nazario (Zachary Moore’s mom)

Related Links:
U.S. Army SPC Zachary Moore Funeral – 8/11/17
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier – Spc. Zachary Charles Moore
Spc. Zachary Moore, 1st Cavalry Division
Fort Hood soldier dies in South Korea
Fort Hood soldier dies in Korea
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead in barracks in South Korea identified
Soldier from VB dies after being found unresponsive in South Korea barrack
Virginia Beach soldier dies in South Korea
Army Soldiers at Fort Hood in Texas Are Dying at Alarming Rates Stateside
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas (US Army)
73 Fort Hood Soldiers Died Since January 2016: 4 Insider Attacks & 2 Suicides Overseas; 67 Stateside Deaths Including 34 Alleged Suicides & 1 Unsolved Homicide
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members
Washington DC Veteran’s Presentation on the Current Status of the Armed Forces at Fort Hood in Texas (2017)
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

The Pendulum Has Swung: Defending Yourself Against False Allegations in Senator Claire McCaskill’s Military Justice System (June 4, 2016)

If you or someone you know has been falsely accused of a crime,
please contact Save Our Heroes.

This animated video describes the obstacles faced by military members who are wrongly or falsely accused of sexual assault. From the recent changes to the UCMJ to the barriers built around the alleged victim, wrongly and falsely accused service members face an uphill battle defending themselves. Court-martial defense lawyer Will M. Helixon, with decades of experience as a sex crimes prosecutor, can team with the military detailed counsel to level the playing field and defend the rights of the wrongly and falsely accused. (www.helixongroup.com)

Learn more: Letter of Support for Save Our Heroes in Our Shared Quest for Military Justice Reform & Constitutional Rights

Navy Reserve Cmdr. Christopher Kalafut Died of a Non-Combat Related Incident at Al Udeid Air Base in Doha, Qatar (2014)

1446520_profile_pic

Cmdr. Christopher Kalafut, US Navy Reserve

Navy Commander Christopher Kalafut, 49, of Oceanside, California died of a non-combat related incident on October 24, 2014 at Al Udeid Air Base in Doha, Qatar. He was found dead in his room. Cmdr. Kalafut was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom on behalf of the Naval Amphibious Liaison Element, Combined Forces Air Component Center at U.S. Central Command. Cmdr. Kalafut graduated from the Merchant Marine Academy in 1987 and entered active duty as an E-2C Hawkeye pilot. He spent some time on the USS Abraham Lincoln and spent six years in the service before leaving and entering the Navy Reserve. He had a civilian job as a pilot for Delta in Atlanta, Georgia. At the time of the DoD press release, the incident was under investigation. The official cause of death is unknown.

He flew with the reserves less often in recent years. The July deployment, a non-flying position, was seen as a final step before retirement. –Steve Kalafut (father)

Related Links:
Obituary: Cmdr. Christopher “Chris” Edward Kalafut
Navy Cmdr. Christopher E. Kalafut
DoD Identifies Navy Casualty
Navy officer dies in Qatar
Navy pilot from Acworth dies in Qatar
Navy commander from Oceanside killed overseas
Navy Officer And Father Of Five Dies In Qatar
San Diego Naval Officer Dies in Qatar
Naval Commander From Oceanside Who Died in Qatar Identified
Navy officer found dead at Qatar air base was pilot nearing retirement, dad says
Navy Officer Found Dead in Qatar Was Pilot Nearing Retirement
Tribute To Our Fallen Soldiers – US Navy Cmdr. Christopher E. Kalafut, 49, of Oceanside, CA


Cmdr. Christopher E. Kalafut, US Navy

Military Wife Conspired with Two Men to Murder Navy Commander Alphonso Doss for One Million Dollar Life Insurance Policy, Yolinda Doss Awaiting Trial (2014)

13595384

Cmdr. Alphonso Doss, US Navy

Navy Commander Alphonso Doss was found dead in his Astoria Hotel room in Orange Park, Florida on February 12, 2014. Both the local civilian authorities and Naval Criminal Investigation Services (NCIS) investigated the circumstances surrounding the homicide. Authorities learned that Alphonso’s estranged wife Yolinda was the mastermind behind the plot to murder her husband. The motive was the one million dollar life insurance policy. Yolinda was having an affair with Anthony Washington, 29, and she manipulate him by using domestic abuse claims as a way to motivate Washington to kill the man who was ‘harming’ her. Washington assaulted, strangled, and stole from Commander Doss claiming he didn’t like the way he treated Yolinda. Washington tried to claim self defense at trial but the jury found him guilty of first degree murder, burglary, and assault. In November 2016, Washington was sentenced to life in prison. Yolinda Doss, 44, and Ronnie Wilson II, 33, do not have trial dates set.

Related Links:
Obituary: Alphonso Mortimer Doss
Wife of murdered Mississippi Navy commander arrested
Estranged wife of slain Navy Commander arrested on murder charges
Alleged murder-for-hire: Does Miss. Navy wife follow in Dad’s footsteps?
Clay County Grand Jury Indicts Wife, Two Others In Navy Commander’s Murder
Estranged wife, 2 men charged in Navy commander’s slaying
Investigators: Motive in plot to murder Navy commander came down to money
This Florida woman wanted a ring from her husband’s finger. Now, police say she’s the reason he’s dead.
First of three defendants goes on trial in murder of Jacksonville Navy commander
1st trial begins in Navy commander’s murder
Trial begins in death of U.S. Navy commander in Orange Park
First trial begins for murder of Navy commander Doss
Trial begins in death of Jacksonville Navy Commander
Evidence reveals details of Navy commander’s killing
Defendant in murder trial admits affair with victim’s wife
Text messages, surveillance video build case in Doss murder case
New documents portray slain Navy commander’s wife as emotionless, scheming for insurance
Trial in Navy commander’s death comes down to a calculated murder or self-defense
Lawyers frame greed and self-defense as competing motives in local Navy Commander’s murder
Man guilty in slaying of Navy commander
Man found guilty in Navy commander’s murder
Guilty: Jury convicts first defendant in Naval commander’s murder
Man convicted for murder of Navy Commander in Orange Park
First of 3 defendants found guilty in murder of former Navy Commander
Navy Commander’s murderer sentenced to life in prison
Man sentenced to life in Navy commander’s murder
Navy Commander Alphonso Doss (Military Corruption)
Naval Commander slain (YouTube)
Arrests made in Navy commander’s death (YouTube)


U.S. Navy Commander Alphonso Doss, 44, was slain at a hotel in Orange Park about two weeks ago. -Action News Jax

Fort Carson Green Beret colonel makes rare speech

George ThiebeFort Carson Green Beret colonel makes rare speech

The reason the Green Berets will seemingly stand still as the rest of the  Army endures the convulsions of the post-war Pentagon is that units such as 10th  Group have thrived on uncertainty and constant change.

“What will be required of our Green Berets in days ahead has not changed,”  Col George Thiebes said.

One fact Thiebes revealed: 10th Group troops have been busy. In the past  year, 1,000 of the soldiers have worked in 42 countries – primarily in Europe,  Africa and the Middle East. That’s no surprise.

Soldiers from 10th Group were some of the first Americans in the 2003 attack  on Iraq. The Fort Carson troops advised the Kurds in northern Iraq that played a  key role in the defeat of Saddam Hussein.

Read more here.

Link

Michael CareyMichael Carey, Air Force General In Charge Of Nuclear Missiles, To Be Fired Over ‘Loss Of Trust’

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Air Force said Friday it fired the two-star general in charge of its nuclear missiles in response to an investigation into alleged personal misbehavior. It was the second sacking this week of a senior commander of nuclear forces.

Maj. Gen. Michael Carey was removed from command of the 20th Air Force, which is responsible for three wings of intercontinental ballistic missiles — a total of 450 missiles at three bases across the country, according to an Air Force spokesman, Brig. Gen. Les Kodlick.

Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/10/11/michael-carey-fired_n_4085154.html?utm_hp_ref=ma

Link

US NavyNavy 3-star fired as No. 2 nuclear commander

WASHINGTON — The Navy says a three-star admiral was notified Wednesday that he has been relieved of duty as second-in-command at the military organization that oversees all U.S. nuclear forces. He is under investigation in a gambling matter.

Read more: http://www.armytimes.com/article/20131009/NEWS/310090029/Navy-3-star-fired-No-2-nuclear-commander

Link

No. 2 nuke commander won’t face charges in Iowa

OMAHA, NEB. — Iowa will take no legal action against the No. 2 officer in charge of U.S. nuclear war-fighting forces who is accused of using counterfeit gambling chips at a casino in the state, officials said Tuesday. Nonetheless, Navy Vice Adm. Tim Giardina could still face federal charges.

Read more: http://www.armytimes.com/article/20131001/NEWS/310010011