Are More Male’s Victims of Violent Crime in the United States Than Females?

fbiJ4e0

This post was inspired by International Men’s Day and a quest to find the truth on the internet. Are men in the US the majority of the victims of crimes?

This research was inspired by the above graphic. My initial research so far for the military backs these numbers so I feel that it is fair to say more men in the military are victims of crimes than women. We have more military men than women so that only makes sense. By the numbers we have roughly 85% males and 15% females. We know more military men have died by suicide or “non combat death” while in service than military women. We know male veterans make up the majority of the homeless mostly due to mental health and substance abuse issues. We don’t know the percentage of men in the military who have been murdered versus the number of female service members. But we do know that the research so far reveals more men are murdered than military women while serving. The number that may throw this off is how many military men are murdering their spouses and significant others and/or members of their family. So more research has to be done.

The Department of Defense hasn’t included the military spouses in the data thus far nor have they included civilians who have been victims of crime by military members. But we know they exist because we try to track all victims of crime perpetrated by a military member on this website in an effort to honor them. Today we featured 30 cases of domestic abuse that led to the homicide of a female spouse or soldier. We have concerns about domestic violence in general especially since we learned that upwards of 40% of males are victims of domestic violence in the United States. We believe it. Since the majority of members in the military are males, we have found multiple cases of men getting targeted by mostly female civilians and then abused and murdered for their benefits and life insurance. In some cases they reported the domestic violence but in most cases they don’t. Why are men less likely to report when they are a victim of domestic violence? Are they being threatened? For example, “I will ruin your career” comes to mind. This is something that needs to be explored further.

Our new concern is that military men are being falsely accused of sex crimes in an effort to make divorce go in the spouses favor or they have been exploited by a service member looking for a new assignment, to get out of a financial obligation, to get an early retirement, and also the Department of Veterans Affairs financial monthly benefits, about $3,000 a month for someone who is 100% disabled. Although sexual assault isn’t specifically mentioned in the above graphic, we also know that the majority of military men are victims of sexual assault and rape but are the least likely to report. We’ve also learned that about a 1/3 of female victims of crime in the military report and 60% of those females report they experienced both perceived personal and professional retaliation as a result of that report, in a lot of cases the report eventually ends the career. And this may be why so many victims of sexual harassment, sexual assault, and rape in the military do not report, specifically men. The military career is an investment that most of us don’t want meddled with.

The military career is our retirement plan, it’s a financial asset. We don’t want to risk losing our careers in the long run because we know a report of a crime or a diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder will make us “unfit for service.”

Our number one goal was to find out if more males are victims of violent crime than females, not that it matters because all people are important. But if you try to find the statistics out there, you will find that they are buried by media reports of how many women are murdered by intimate partner violence, pregnant women are especially at risk. Whereas males are more likely to be the victim of a crime perpetrated by a stranger. Make sure and check out The Red Pill trailer below to find out why Men’s Rights Advocates are fighting for their fellow males. Women do it all the time and there’s no reason they can’t either but they are getting judged, villianized, and demonized for their very important and necessary work. It’s time to step it up for men who die by homicide and suicide; and it’s time we teach them it’s okay to reach out for help whether they have combat PTSD or were a victim of crime.

Broad studies have revealed certain trends within crime and victimization patterns. Adolescents are most likely to be victimized. Men become crime victims more often than women do, and blacks experience more crime than other racial groups. –National Institute of Justice

  • More men are murdered than women, mostly gun violence
  • Men are more likely to be murdered by a stranger than a women
  • Women are more likely to be murdered by an intimate partner
  • Pregnant women are at most risk of homicide by an intimate partner
  • More men than women are raped and sexually assaulted in the military
  • More men than women in the US are raped if you include prisons
  • Men make up 40% of domestic violence cases in the US
  • Adolescents leading cause of death is homicide
  • More men commit suicide than women
  • More men commit crime than women
  • Women rape, abuse, bully, and kill

2009:
Who is Most Likely to be a Crime Victim?

2010:
More than 40% of domestic violence victims are male, report reveals

2011:
Most likely to be a homicide victim?

2012:
CDC Study: More Men than Women Victims of Partner Abuse
Why Are Men More Likely To Be Homeless?

2013:
Gun Suicides Outnumber Gun Homicides
Victims of sex assaults in military are mostly men
More men are raped in the US than women, figures on prison assaults reveal
Men, Young Adults Make Up Majority of Gun Homicide Victims
NYPD stats: 70% of shooting suspects in first half of 2013 were black
A competition of suffering: Male vs. female rape
Is homelessness a men’s issue?

2014:
Criminals, Victims and the Black Men Left Behind
Serial Killer Myth #3: They Are All Men
Serial Killer Myth No. 5: All Victims Are Female
The Surprising Truth About Women and Violence
Our attitude to violence against men is out of date
Alcohol linked to more homicides in US than any other substance
When Men Are Raped
Woman As Aggressor: The Unspoken Truth Of Domestic Violence
Only one percent of male military victims report sexual assault
Phoenix-area murder stats: Most victims young men

2015:
An Unbelievable Story of Rape
White Females Are Rarely Murder Victims or Perpetrators
Most Victims Are Men: 5 Realities Of Rape In The Military
The Number of Male Domestic Abuse Victims Is Shockingly High — So Why Don’t We Hear About Them?
SNAPSHOT: Male Victims of Violent Crime
Criminal sentencing: Do women get off easy?
Baltimore records deadliest month in more than 40 years

2016:
The Understudied Female Sexual Predator
Yes, Male Victims of Domestic Violence Exist & It’s Time to Talk About It
Male hazing most common type of sexual assault, expert reveals
When No One Calls it Rape: Addressing Sexual Violence Against Men & Boys
Gun crime victimizes men the most—which is also why it’s so hard to stop
Murders by Women Differ from Those by Men, Study Says
Chicago: 75% of Murdered Are Black, 71% of Murderers Are Black
Sexual Victimization by Women Is More Common Than Previously Known
Why are we shocked when women commit violent crimes?
Military Sexual Assault Victims Discharged After Filing Complaints
Victims and Victimization – National Institute of Justice
Why Are There More Homeless Men Than Women?
7 Statistics You Need To Know About Black-On-Black Crime
Killings in Compton have tripled this year, rattling nerves and testing a key anti-crime initiative
More than 60 shot in Chicago over July 4th weekend
Chicago surpasses 600 homicides in 2016 and is on pace to have its deadliest year in two decades
Homicides in Charlotte rise to a 6-year high

2017:
The Alienating Parent – A Voice for Men
African Americans Are Eight Times More Likely to Be Victims of Homicide Than Whites, Says CDC
CDC: Half Of All Female Homicide Victims Are Killed By Intimate Partners
After Weinstein: The Fallout for 34 Men Accused of Sexual Misconduct, From Lewd Texts to Rape
Conyers steps down from House Judiciary Committee amid sex harassment claims
Military wife, model sexually assaulted by senator while on USO tour
Lindsay Menz, Sen. Al Franken Accuser: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Al Franken, under pressure to resign, vows to ‘learn from my mistakes’
Roy Moore Feeding Frenzy Displays A Society Murdering Due Process
Inside the First Men-Only Domestic Violence Shelter in Texas
Male victims of domestic violence are being failed by the system
A panic is not an answer: We’re at imminent risk of turning this #metoo moment into a frenzied rush to blame all men
Poor people are more likely to be victims of violent crimes, says report
What Domestic Violence Against Men Looks Like
Violence and Homicide Among Youth
Las Vegas Valley homicides keep pace with 2016 numbers
America’s murder rate is rising at its fastest pace since the early 1970s
71 people have died in homicides this year in OKC
Fort Worth responds to spike in crime: ‘We needed to do something, so we moved quickly’
Homicides Down in DC; Some Nearby Counties See Notable Increase
Police identify victim, suspect in Charlotte’s 56th homicide of 2017
In Baton Rouge, We’re Dealing With A Hurricane Of Murders

In the News:
I didn’t Know – Angry Staff Officer
Navy Grounds Whidbey Crew After Lewd Skywriting Incident
A Teen Vogue writer said she didn’t feel bad about sacrificing “innocent men” and got what she deserved
Hugs Are Rape And Compliments Molest Me: How #MeToo Became A Toxic Feminist Movement
Lena Dunham’s Rape Virtue-Signaling Comes Back To Haunt Her
International Men’s Day: FIVE Female Killers who Murdered Soldiers, Veterans and Spouses
30 Domestic Abuse Cases in the Military That Ended in the Murder of Female Partners
A List of Soldiers Targeted & Murdered for the Servicemen’s Group Life Insurance Benefits (SGLI)
Meeting The Enemy: A feminist comes to terms with the men’s rights movement
You Can Get PTSD From Staying In An Emotionally Abusive Relationship
Leading Causes of Injury Deaths by Age Group Highlighting Violence-Related Injury Deaths, United States – 2015

30 Domestic Abuse Cases in the Military That Ended in the Murder of Female Partners (2017)

cdc-graphic

Graphic Courtesy of Futures Without Violence (2017)

Related Links:
Racial and Ethnic Differences in Homicides of Adult Women and the Role of Intimate Partner Violence — United States, 2003–2014
CDC: Half Of All Female Homicide Victims Are Killed By Intimate Partners
Vast Majority of Female Murder Victims Killed by Partners: New CDC Report

How do we stop the retaliation from happening so victims of crimes in the military feel safe to report?

Even if you do go forward with a case and it’s adjudicated in your favor, it’s the retaliation that kicks our ass and de-rails our careers. Why is this happening? If you wonder why some who have been assaulted have severe PTSD, it’s the retaliation compounding the original trauma. And if you don’t report and try and soldier on, it catches up with you anyways in the form of behavioral issues and suicidal ideation. How do we stop the retaliation in the military from happening so victims of crimes feel safe to report?

Related Links:
Home Base Veteran Story: Jennifer & Lee Norris
Personal Story and Testimony of TSgt. Jennifer Norris, US Air Force Retired, Before the House Armed Services Committee in Washington DC (2013)
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members
Massachusetts School of Law Interviews Veteran Jennifer Norris About Violent Crime in the Military & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
What Happens When a Rape is Reported in the Military?

Fort Hood Army Spc. Zachary Moore Found Unresponsive in Barracks on Deployment to Camp Hovey, South Korea; CID Ruled Suicide (2017)

SPC-Moore-235x300

Spc. Zachary Moore, US Army

Spc. Zachary Moore, 23, of Virginia Beach, Virginia, was found unresponsive August 1, 2017 in his barracks room at Camp Hovey in South Korea. Spc. Moore was transported to St. Mary’s Hospital and pronounced deceased on August 2, 2017. Spc. Moore entered active-duty military service in March 2014 as a signal support systems specialist. He was assigned to the 9th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood in Texas since July 2016. The circumstances surrounding the incident were investigated by the U.S. Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) and the cause of death was ruled a suicide.

*****************************************

Was Zachary Moore’s Death Preventable?

In May 2017, Fort Hood announced they were deploying 3,500 troops to South Korea over the summer. Twenty-three (23) year old Zachary Moore was one of the soldiers deployed to South Korea. With full knowledge of Zachary’s recent mental health issues, the Chain of Command gave him a mental health waiver against his will, and most likely against medical advice, so they could deploy him to South Korea.

In October 2016, Zachary had a mental health breakdown and went Absent without Leave (AWOL). After a successful intervention, Zachary was found and returned to the custody of his Chain of Command at Fort Hood. Zachary’s command then sent him to an emergency room where he was hospitalized and prescribed medication. After Zachary was discharged from the hospital, he continued to seek treatment for mental health issues. Six months later, Zachary was given a mental health waiver by his command to deploy to South Korea.

About a month after Zachary arrived at Camp Hovey in South Korea, his depression medication was changed. As a matter of fact, his depression medication was changed the day before he was found unresponsive in his barracks room. Zachary attempted to kill himself on August 1st, less than 24 hours after the medication change. It was Zachary who called his Command for help as there is no 911 on the base in South Korea. He was found unresponsive and finally transported to the hospital about 1 ½ to 2 hours later. He was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, listed as critical then stable, yet passed away on August 2, 2017.

Why did Zachary Moore go AWOL?

The Chain of Command contacted Jeanette to report Zachary hadn’t been seen since October 18, 2016. They also informed her they were not actively looking for him but would file AWOL status on October 20th. When asked if they filed a missing persons report, Jeanette claims they told her they did but she says she was lead to believe Zachary trashed his room, took his things, and left willingly. She immediately flew to Texas from Florida to find him.

Jeanette contacted the Killeen Police Department as soon as she got to Fort Hood and the local law enforcement found Zachary the same day she arrived. Over the phone, the Command told Jeanette they filed a missing persons report but she learned from the Killeen Police Department that they never did. The Killeen PD noticed recent activity on Facebook so they pinged Zach’s cell phone & found that he was in a remote area of a local state park.

Zachary attempted to flee initially but after negotiations, he surrendered and was returned to the police station where his mom was waiting. Jeanette could tell Zachary was mentally broken and he admitted to her that he wanted to hurt himself.  The Killeen PD found Zachary and he had a knife in his possession. Zachary was returned to the custody of his Chain of Command at Fort Hood. Shortly after Zachary informed his mom that his superiors told him to tell her to leave town and stop interfering.

Jeanette reports that Zachary never had any mental health issues prior to this and suspected that Zachary was “singled out by his command and harassed.”

Areas of Concern in Zachary Moore’s Case:

  • Zachary revealed he was harassed by his Chain of Command. For example, his leave papers to visit family before deploying were denied; he was denied permission to see the Fort Hood Inspector General officer; he was harassed during training exercises; he was given exhausting extra duties; and was accused of taking a radio which was later found on a military officer’s desk. Why was he denied the opportunity to speak to the IG officer?
  • Zachary was accused of trashing his room and taking his belongings when he went AWOL. Jeanette believes the circumstances surrounding the vandalism of his room and the theft of his property could be evidence of harassment.
  • During mental health treatment, Zachary was facing the consequences of going AWOL; Zachary was accused of trashing his own room; and Zachary was accused of stealing a secure radio? What are the additional mental health impacts of the way the Chain of Command uses the military justice system?
  • The circumstances of the mental health waiver and the justifications for sending Zachary to South Korea while he was undergoing treatment for mental health issues and medication management should be investigated.
  • The effects of the medication change in South Korea should be investigated. Is Command aware that some medications can cause serious negative reactions? (Some depression medication causes suicidal ideation.) Who monitors serious medication changes in deployed locations? Is it safe to deploy soldiers in the early phases of medication management for mental health issues?
  • Finally, the delay in the Command’s response to Zachary’s call for help in South Korea should be investigated. Why did it take so long to respond to Zachary and why did it take so long to get Zachary to the hospital? Did anyone attempt to administer help while waiting for the ambulance?
  • If the Command was the cause of the mental health break, where was Zachary supposed to turn? How do we hold the Chain of Command accountable? How do we prevent the Chain of Command from retaliating and using the military justice system or non judicial punishment as a weapon? What was the role of the Commander? What was the role of the Fort Hood Inspector General? How can we prevent a young soldier from feeling like the only way out of their situation is AWOL or suicide? How could we have prevented Zachary’s death?
  • Soldiers have come forward, given their stories to the family and have offered to testify about what Zachary was put through which may explain why he died. Were these soldiers questioned?

Source: Jeanette Nazario (Zachary Moore’s mom)

Related Links:
U.S. Army SPC Zachary Moore Funeral – 8/11/17
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier – Spc. Zachary Charles Moore
Spc. Zachary Moore, 1st Cavalry Division
Fort Hood soldier dies in South Korea
Fort Hood soldier dies in Korea
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead in barracks in South Korea identified
Soldier from VB dies after being found unresponsive in South Korea barrack
Virginia Beach soldier dies in South Korea
Army Soldiers at Fort Hood in Texas Are Dying at Alarming Rates Stateside
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas (US Army)
73 Fort Hood Soldiers Died Since January 2016: 4 Insider Attacks & 2 Suicides Overseas; 67 Stateside Deaths Including 34 Alleged Suicides & 1 Unsolved Homicide
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non-Combat Death at Fort Bliss, Texas (US Army)

Fort-Bliss-Hospital10

*Research not complete and includes combat deaths.

2017:

Adam Acosta, US Army Veteran: Accused of Homicide
John Barcellano, US Army: Fatal Motorcyle Accident
Tyler Croke, US Army: Homicide Victim
Riley Gast, US Army: Found Dead in Desert, Cause of Death Unknown
Zachary Johnston, US Army Veteran: Accused of Homicide
Hansen Kirkpatrick, US Army: Indirect Fire Attack, Afghanistan
Brandon Olsen, US Army: Accused of Homicide
John Rodriguez, US Army: Non-Combat Related Incident, Kuwait

2016:

Anthony Bowden, US Army: Accused of Homicide
Eric Duvall, US Army: Accused of Homicide
Tyler Hall, US Army: Accused of Homicide
Melvin Jones, US Army: AWOL, Missing, Found
Dante Naken Dewayne Long, US Army: Homicide Victim
Ronald Murray, Jr., US Army: Non-Combat Death, Vehicle Accident, Kuwait
Jake Obad-Mathis, US Army: AWOL, Missing, Found
MG John Rossi, US Army: Death Rule Suicide
Audi Sumilat, US Army: Guilty of Gun Smuggling; Final Disposition Unknown
Devon Ward, US Army: AWOL, Missing, Found Dead
Aaron Wolfe, US Army Veteran: Passed Away Unexpectedly

2015:

Gabriel Benavidez, Civilian: Victim of Physical Assault
Andrew Budd, US Army: Found Dead in Home, Cause of Death Unknown
Dr. Timothy Fjordbak, Veterans Affairs: Homicide Victim
Deric Joyce, US Army (2015): Pleaded Guilty to Aggravated Battery Resulting in Great Bodily Harm
Jerry Serrato, US Army Veteran: Homicide, Suicide
Jonathan Wynkoop, US Army: Died in Training Exercise

2014:

Christina Bukovcik, US Army: Homicide Victim
Devon Huerta-Person, US Army: Charged with Aggravated Assault
Dartarious Graham, US Army: Homicide, Sentenced to 40 Years
Peyton Graham, US Army Dependent: Homicide Victim
Geomel Shaffa, US Army: Homicide of Spouse, Sentenced to 50 Years

2013:

Jackson Farrey, US Army Dependent: Homicide victim
Jeffrey Farrey, US Army: Homicide, sentenced to 20 years
Jenna Farrey, US Army Spouse: Homicide, sentenced to 35 years
Troy Kent, US Army: Fatal automobile accident
Corey Moss, US Army: Attempted murder, sentenced to 30 years
Rachel Poole, US Army Spouse: Victim of attempted homicide
Timothy Santos Jr., US Army: Non combat related illness, Kuwait
Mariza Shaffa, US Army Spouse: Victim of attempted homicide

2012:

James Brown, US Army: Died While in Jail for DWI Charge
Malachi Cosby, US Army Dependent: Homicide Victim
Crispen Hanson, US Army: Homicide, Sentenced to 8 Years
Francisco Perez, US Army: Homicide, Afghanistan, Sentenced to 15 Months
Neil Turner, US Army: Homicide Victim, Afghanistan
Shawn Williams, US Army: Court of Criminal Appeals Decision

2011:

Kelvin Gooding, US Army: Homicide Victim
Lykisha Gooding, US Army: Homicide Victim
Alex Jaime, US Army: Homicide Victim
Zareef Saleel, US Army: Homicide of Alex Jaime, Sentenced to Life in Prison
James Steadman, US Army: Homicide of 2 Soldiers; Shot & Killed by Woman

2010:

Robert Nichols, US Army: Suicide

2009:

Michael Apodaca, US Army: Homicide, Sentenced to Life
Cassaundra Beckel, US Army: Homicide Victim by Spouse
Kevin Beckel, US Army: Homicide of Spouse, Suicide
Jacob Engle, US Army: Accidental Shooting Death
Gerald Polanco, US Army: Accused of Homicide, Incompetent to Stand Trial
Thelton Riley, Civilian: Homicide, Sentenced to 30 Years
Leesa Trujillo, Civilian: Injury to Child & Involuntary Manslaughter, Sentenced to 10 Years
Justin Weckel, US Army: Suspected Suicide
Keiffer Wilhelm, US Army: Non combat related incident, suicide, Iraq

2008:

Clinton Lewis, US Army Spouse: Accused of Kidnapping, Rape & Stabbing Wife; Final Disposition Unknown
Jeneesa Lewis, US Army: Kidnapped, Stabbed & Raped but Found Alive

2007:

John Fish, US Army: Suspected Suicide

2003:

Jamaal Addison, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
Robert Dowdy, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
Ruben Estrella-Soto, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
Edgar Hernandez, US Army: POW, Iraq, Rescued by USMC
Joseph Hudson, US Army: POW, Iraq, Rescued by USMC
Howard Johnson II, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
Shoshana Johnson, US Army: POW, Iraq, Rescued by USMC
James Kiehl, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
Jessica Lynch, US Army: POW, Iraq, Rescued by USMC
Johnny Mata, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
Patrick Miller, US Army: POW, Iraq, Rescued by USMC
Lori Piestewa, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
James Riley, US Army: POW, Iraq, Rescued by USMC
Brandon Sloan, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq
Donald Walters, US Army: Killed in Ambush, Iraq

2001:

Lynn Reister, US Army: Homicide Victim
Roger Reister, US Army: Homicide of Capt. Lynn Reister for SGLI

2000:

Luis Rodriguez-Martinez, US Army: Suicide or Murder?

1991:

Anthony Riggs, US Army: Homicide Victim

1984:

Nathan Craig, US Army: Homicide Victim
Willie Jackson, US Army: Homicide, Suicide

1979:

Vernon Shearer, US Army: Homicide Victim

1977:

Chester Garrett, US Army: Homicide Victim
Andrew Heard, US Army: 2 Homicides, Sentenced to 15-55 Years in Prison after Released from 4 Years in Prison for Murder of German Woman
Ralph Sigler, US Army: Suicide or Murder?

1944:

Cecil Cash, US Army: Homicide Victim, War Crime

Related Links:
8 missing soldiers identified as dead
Iraq War 2003: Attack On Fort Bliss’ 507th Maintenance Company
As a Brigade Returns Safe, Some Meet New Enemies
Army investigates radiation exposure at Fort Bliss
General’s remarks about suicide “upsetting”
At Army base, an aggressive campaign against suicide
At A Texas Base, Battling Army’s Top Threat: Suicide
Military Experts: With ISIS in El Paso, Ft. Bliss in Danger of Terrorist Attack
Murders Up, but El Paso Still Safe, Lawmakers Say
Pentagon has struggled with a jump in child abuse in military families since America went to war
General with Bliss ties is most senior Army officer to kill self
The General Who Went to War On Suicide

Stalking is Dangerous (2017)


Vegas Bray is convicted of murder and sentenced 50 years to life in prison. A friend of Vegas’s, Kevin Oseguera says “the monster inside of her” shot Victor, not his friend. -Snapped on Oxygen

Related Links:
Navy Veteran Victor Saucedo Shot and Killed in Home by Ex-Girlfriend; Navy Veteran Vegas Bray Sentenced to 50 Years to Life in Prison (2012)
Sgt. Bill Coffin Murdered Ex-Fiancee After Civilian Courts Issued Protective Order, Judge Alleges Army Routinely Ignores Court Orders (1997)
National Stalking Resource Center

Questionable Practices Continue at Fort Belvior Warrior Transition Battalion: One Delaware Army National Guard Soldier’s Story After Injured in the Line of Duty

National Guard

Guest Post Submitted by Jill Lee

I cannot in good conscience remain silent about the treatment of our wounded and injured service members and their families. I am writing this letter on behalf of my husband Sgt. Thomas Lee. He medically retired from the Delaware National Guard’s 153rd MP Company in August 21, 2016. He deployed to Afghanistan January to September 2013. Upon returning from deployment he was sent to the Wounded Transition Battalion (WTB) at Fort Belvoir, VA in October 2013 for neck, back, shoulder, skin and stomach issues. The time frame for service members to spend at the WTB is approximately 12 months; my husband was there for 3 years. When my husband arrived, there were around 300 service members there. Every service member is assigned a nurse case manager who oversees the scheduling of appointments and does weekly check-ins with them. The nurse case manager’s job is to support and facilitate the care of service members; however, often they are misleading and at times lying to get information which is used by the command against the service members. The WTB does not promote an atmosphere of healing but rather one of harassment and punishment, where they provide the bare minimum of care, distribute medications and focus on the symptoms rather than diagnose and treat the actual issues. The WTB along with Fort Belvoir Community Hospital has failed my husband along with countless other service members. Our service members and families sacrifice so much for our country and it is a shame to see how they get treated when they return from combat broken physically and mentally.

My husband and I lived through a nightmare for the past 3 years, he was fortunate enough to survive 2 deployments only to be permanently disabled by a military doctor here in the states. Do you know what it’s like to watch helplessly someone you love whose served their country go from injured to permanently damaged and not to be able to hold any one accountable? My husband came to the WTB with 2 careers, 21 years with the Postal Service and 18 years of military service, he left the WTB unable to return to either career. Below are the events that forever changed our lives.

Continue reading

Retired Army Veteran Marinna Rollins Shot & Killed Estranged Husband’s Dog with New Boyfriend; Less Then Two Weeks After Arrested & Charged, She Committed Suicide (2017)

Screen Shot 2017-05-21 at 7.14.37 PM

Marinna Rollins, US Army Retired

Army veteran Marinna Rollins, 23, was found dead of an apparent suicide on May 7, 2017 in Fayetteville, North Carolina. According to reports, Rollins was medically retired from the Army with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after a traumatic event while stationed in South Korea. Rollins was involved in the execution style killing of her estranged husband’s dog Huey around April 16 or 17. The harrowing incident was filmed and released to the public resulting in worldwide coverage. Marinna and her accomplice, Jarren Heng, were both facing felony charges in court. Jarren Heng is an active duty soldier stationed at Fort Bragg and he still faces felony charges, although the conspiracy charge was dropped after Marinna died. Meanwhile a Facebook page was created called Justice for Huey and they are also petitioning the Army to take action. According to Marinna’s estranged husband, Matt Dyer, Marinna was watching the dog for him while he was in South Korea but at some point decided she wanted to keep the dog and didn’t want to give Huey back. Meanwhile, she registered the dog as an emotional support animal. Matt shared that he was okay with her keeping the dog because he thought Huey would be good for her PTSD. Matt and Justice for Huey have been empathetic of Marinna and believe that had Jarren Heng never entered her life, this would not have happened. Matt expressed that he was aware that Jarren hated Huey and was controlling of Marinna. Marinna and Matt grew up together in Windham, Maine and were still technically married as their divorce had not been finalized yet. Initially it appears that Marinna did try and find a home for the dog with no success. Matt thinks Jarren Heng convinced Marinna to get rid of the dog. Did Jarren Heng pressure her to get rid of the dog because it was her soon to be ex-husband’s dog? We may never know the answer to that question but nonetheless this is a very heartbreaking situation: an innocent dog lost a life, another soldier with Post Traumatic Stress lost her life, and Matt lost his childhood friend & wife and his dog.

Related Links:
Justice for Huey on Facebook
Petition: To Seek UCMJ Punishment of Army Specialist Jarren Heng
Owner of dog slain by veteran and soldier speaks out on what really happened
Accused dog killer’s sister, separated husband still trying to process ‘shocking’ incident
Marinna Rollins & Jarren Heng: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Army veteran from Maine accused of brutally killing service dog
Vet And Her Soldier Boyfriend Shot Dog 10 Times, New Report Shows
A Veteran Tied Her Service Dog to a Tree and Shot It 5 Times, Officials Say
Cops: Ex-soldier kills her service dog while her boyfriend videotapes
Prosecutor: NC military couple laughed as they fatally shot service dog
Army vet, boyfriend laugh while killing PTSD service dog, DA says
Army vet and special ops soldier boyfriend charged with shooting her service dog
Veteran Charged with Tying PTSD Service Dog to Tree, Shooting 5 Times
Bail raised for veteran, soldier accused in execution of veteran’s PTSD therapy dog
Army veteran who filmed herself killing her own service dog gets bail increase to $25K
Marinna Rollins army vet: Why I filmed myself shooting my service dog dead 5 times
Veteran who shot service dog on video found dead
Army vet who killed her service dog is found dead
Female soldier caught on video killing dog found DEAD
Marinna Rollins: Ex-Soldier Recorded Shooting Service Dog Found Dead
Windham veteran accused of executing therapy dog, posting video on Facebook, found dead
Marinna Rollins, ex-soldier who was recorded fatally shooting service dog, is found dead
Army veteran kills herself after being filmed tying service dog to tree and shooting it dead
Army veteran accused of murdering service dog commits suicide nine days before trial
Female army veteran ‘who tied her PTSD dog to a tree and killed it is found dead’
Veteran arrested in dog’s killing on Facebook found dead
Army Veteran Arrested For Murdering Her Dog Commits Suicide
Sad end to grisly episode: Ex-soldier who killed dog is found dead

Massachusetts School of Law Interviews Veteran Jennifer Norris About Violent Crime in the Military & Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Massachusetts School of Law explored violent crime in the military with Jennifer Norris, Military Justice for All, and the impact it has on civilians too. Jennifer talked about her experiences with four different perpetrators within the first two years of her enlisted career, the reporting & adjudication process, and the retaliation that ensued and eventually ended a fifteen year career. Also discussed was the jurisdictional hurdles that arise with a transient population like the military. For example, Jennifer was not able to press charges against one perpetrator because he moved out of state after learning he was getting reported. Another perpetrator was active duty Air Force at Keesler Air Force Base, therefore a state National Guard commander did not have jurisdiction of a federal employee. And finally, although Jennifer was able to move forward with two other cases involving high ranking National Guard members with over eighteen years of service, unlike the civilian world, after the cases were adjudicated, they retired with full military retirement benefits and no public records.

Jennifer also shared that although the Department of Defense downplays violent crime in the military and sexual assault appears to be closely monitored by some female members of Congress, everything is not under control. The crime appears to be escalating. The military doesn’t just have a sexual assault issue, they have a domestic violence and homicide issue as well. They also have a pattern of ruling soldier’s deaths both stateside and overseas as suicides, training accidents, and illness despite families strongly protesting and evidence revealing otherwise. Domestic violence is more likely to lead to homicide and unfortunately the two issues have not been given the attention they deserve because until you do the research yourself and see how many families and communities have been impacted by the crimes, suspicious death, and homicide of a soldier or civilian, you wouldn’t know because Congress and the main stream media do not give it the attention it deserves. Homicide and independent investigations of all suspicious deaths should be given the highest priority not only because people have lost their lives and families deserve answers but because someone needs to be held accountable. We must prevent others from becoming victims of these crimes too.

Jennifer discussed the lasting impacts the crimes and retaliation had on her. Jennifer was empowered after doing all that she could do to protect others from getting harmed by the same people, but her squadron did not see it the same way. After the cases were adjudicated, Jennifer faced hostility from a couple of the perpetrator’s friends and her Chain of Command once she returned back to work. She eventually had to transfer to another squadron. It was the professional and personal retaliation that made her start feeling more intense feelings of anxiety, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. And unfortunately her next squadron wasn’t any more welcoming then the last. She was told shortly after arriving that ‘no female makes it in the satellite communications work center’ and that she was experiencing hostility from her new Chain of Command because the old squadron called and informed them she was a ‘troublemaker.’ The retaliation had a direct impact on her mental health and cemented an already traumatizing experience with further abuse, indifference, and judgement. By the time she got to her third squadron (almost ten years after the first attack), she learned that the Department of Veterans Affairs treated Post Traumatic Stress resulting from military sexual trauma.

After Jennifer informed her third squadron that she was getting help for the PTS at the Department of Veterans Affairs, she was immediately red flagged and asked to leave the squadron until she could produce a note from her doctor giving her permission to be at work. She did this and jumped through the other hoops asked of her in an attempt to save her career but lost confidentiality in the process. Jennifer walked away from her career in the end because she refused to release her VA records for a security clearance investigation. The entire experience not only opened her up to judgement again (simply because she asked for some counseling due to what someone else did) but she had to prove that she was ‘fit for duty’ while the perpetrators were enjoying full military retirement benefits. Jennifer chose a second chance at a civilian career when she refused to release her confidential VA records for her security clearance investigation because she wanted to ensure a future free of a tainted security clearance. It makes zero sense that someone who is a victim of crime be negatively impacted by the crimes of others in yet another way. The hypocrisy of the system is truly revealed when you look at how the perpetrators were let off the hook but the victim of crime loses their military career because they had the strength to first report and then eventually ask for help.

11 Signs of a Sneaky Sociopath

Psychopaths and sociopaths behave differently but both can be just as dangerous. This public service announcement will help educate the reader about the sociopath specifically because sociopaths are both non-violent and violent and use charm and pity to enter your life. There is limited research available on the non-violent sociopath but Dr. Martha Stout, the author of The Sociopath Next Door, does a great job at helping the reader understand how the charming sociopaths operate. Many people have asked Dr. Stout how to protect themselves from the non-violent sociopath. Dr. Stout’s advice to those who want to protect themselves from these social predators is beware of those who use the ‘pity play’ in an effort to appeal to your sympathies.

The Sociopath Next Door is an eye-opening book and highly recommended reading for everyone, especially those interested in criminal justice reform and military justice reform. Research of sociopaths has revealed that the non-violent sociopath has a tendency to abuse the court processes and level false allegations against their enemy in an effort to harm reputations, improve their financial situation, or simply for revenge because you rejected them. Rejection is the trigger for sociopaths. If you find yourself dealing with a vindictive personality, it is best not to engage. If you provoke the non-violent sociopath, it will only make the situation worse. Learn more about the modus operandi of sociopaths to prevent getting entangled in their web of lies.

15741180_1671101012907392_1230412025192901896_n

We are accustomed to think of sociopaths as violent criminals, but in The Sociopath Next Door, Harvard psychologist Martha Stout reveals that a shocking 4 percent of ordinary people have an often undetected mental disorder, the chief symptom of which is that that person possesses no conscience. He or she has no ability whatsoever to feel shame, guilt, or remorse. One in twenty-five everyday Americans, therefore, is secretly a sociopath. They could be your colleague, your neighbor, even family. And they can do literally anything at all and feel absolutely no guilt… (Inside Jacket Cover of The Sociopath Next Door)

1 in 25 ordinary Americans secretly has no conscience and can do anything at all without feeling guilty. Who is the devil you know?The Sociopath Next Door


Think you can easily spot a sociopath? Think again. Sociopaths aren’t always the stereotypical “serial killer type” you might be thinking of. These individuals come in all shapes and sizes. Your best friend, significant other, roommate, or family member could be hiding a dark secret. Instant Checkmate compiled the 11 signs of a sneaky sociopath. Ready to learn more? Run a background check on them. -www.InstantCheckmate.com

Sociopaths are experts at presenting themselves as everyday people, so they can be difficult to identify…Unless you know the signs of a sociopath. Sociopathy is also known as antisocial personality disorder. A sociopathic person will typically have no understanding of right or wrong. There is no treatment for sociopathy. The disorder can be prevented in children who show early signs but among adults, the disorder is permanent. You may know an actual sociopath, though you may not even be aware of it. So what indicators can we look for?

  1. Superficial Charm: Sociopaths often appear to be very charming on the surface in order to manipulate trust.
  2. Narcissism: Sociopaths are extremely egocentric. They believe that everyone should agree with their actions and opinions.
  3. Pathological Lying: Sociopaths will lie in order to create a false persona. They aim to hide their true motives.
  4. Manipulative & Cunning: Sociopaths attempt to find and exploit other people’s weaknesses in order to get what they want.
  5. Shallow Emotions: Sociopaths do not genuinely feel emotions. Many can fake their emotions to fool the people around them.
  6. Lack of Remorse, Shame, or Guilt: Sociopaths do not feel bad about their actions, even if they hurt others.
  7. Incapable of Human Attachment: Sociopaths can’t form genuine relationships with others. They may form relationships in order to appear normal.
  8. Constant Need for Stimulation: Sociopaths may take unnecessary risks that put themselves and others in dangerous situations.
  9. Lack of Empathy: Sociopaths are unable to relate the perspectives or problems of other people.
  10. Impulsive Nature: Sociopaths will exhibit hostility, irritability, and aggression. They act on their impulses without caring without caring about any potential consequences.
  11. Promiscuous Sexual Behavior: Sociopaths are likely to be unfaithful and promiscuous, which is connected to their tendency to get bored easily.

Sociopaths may have problems with drug and alcohol use. They may also have a criminal record related to their behavior. You can get a background check at Instant Checkmate.

screen-shot-2017-01-02-at-5-41-07-pm

Psychopath vs. Sociopath