Killeen PD: Army SSG Anthony Lovell Died of Injuries Sustained in Apparent Motorcycle Accident Along Nolan Creek in Killeen, Texas (2017)

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SSG Anthony Lovell, US Army

Army Staff Sergeant Anthony Lovell, 40, died of injuries sustained in an apparent motorcycle accident along Nolan Creek in Killeen, Texas on July 3, 2017. According to witnesses, SSG Lovell’s body was found in a mysteriously different location then the motorcycle. But the Killeen Police Department determined SSG Lovell was traveling south on 8th Street and failed to make a turn into a mobile home park in the area. Investigators claim SSG Lovell left the road, hit an embankment, and went airborne. Therefore, this accounted for the separation of the body and the motorcycle. And as a result, the accident caused multiple blunt force injuries.

“The motorcycle accident was around 8 p.m. on July 3. Lovell was going southbound in the 300 block of Eighth Street. Police say he failed to negotiate a turn and left the roadway then went airborne and into Nolan Creek. The soldier suffered a fatal head injury and was pronounced dead at 8:38 p.m.” -Killeen PD

SSG Lovell was a resident of Killeen, Texas; he was stationed at Fort Hood in March 2015 as a cavalry scout assigned to the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. SSG Lovell joined the Army in September 1997 and deployed twice to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from April 2007 to June 2008 and from September 2009 to August 2010. At the time of the Fort Hood press release, the circumstances surrounding the incident were under investigation by the Killeen Police Department.

Related Links:
Obituary: Anthony Ray Lovell
SSG Anthony Ray Lovell | Chisolm’s Family Funeral Home
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier – Staff Sgt. Anthony Ray Lovell
Staff Sgt. Anthony Ray Lovell, 1st Cavalry Division | Fort Hood Sentinel
In Memory Of US Army SSG Anthony Ray Lovell | Freedom Isn’t Free
Fort Hood identifies soldier who died after apparent motorcycle crash
Army identifies Fort Hood soldier killed in motorcycle accident | Army Times
Army identifies Fort Hood soldier killed in motorcycle accident | GD News
Body at Nolan Creek identified
Fort Hood soldier dies after motorcycle accident
Man found dead by creek ID’d as Fort Hood soldier
Man found dead near creek identified as Fort Hood soldier
Fort Hood Soldier’s Body Found Near Creek
Fort Hood soldier dies after motorcycle accident
Fort Hood soldier dies after motorcycle accident | WDAM-TV
Fort Hood soldier laid to rest, survived by wife and three children
Fort Hood soldier laid to rest, survived by wife and three children | KXXV-TV
Army Soldiers at Fort Hood in Texas Are Dying at Alarming Rates Stateside
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas (US Army)
73 Fort Hood Soldiers Died Since January 2016: 4 Insider Attacks & 2 Suicides Overseas; 67 Stateside Deaths Including 34 Alleged Suicides & 1 Unsolved Homicide
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members (2016)
Washington DC Veteran’s Presentation on the Current Status of the Armed Forces at Fort Hood in Texas (2017)
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

Fort Hood Military Police Sgt. Calvin Aguilar, US Army, Found Dead in Copperas Cove, Texas (2016)

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Sgt. Calvin Aguilar, US Army

Sgt. Calvin Aguilar, 32, US Army, was found dead in Copperas Cove, Texas on August 4, 2016. Sgt. Aguilar’s home of record is listed as Hayward, California and he joined the Army in October 2006. Sgt. Aguilar was a working dog handler assigned to the 720th Military Police Battalion, 89th Military Police Brigade at Fort Hood. He deployed in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from December 2007 to March 2009 and Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan from January 2012 to January 2013. He was married with one daughter and the proud owner of Nico, a military working dog he was reunited with. At the time of the Fort Hood press release, the circumstances surrounding the incident were under investigation.

Sgt. Aguilar was the kind of person you can only hope to encounter once in your life. He wore many hats: brother, friend, counselor, drinking buddy, designated driver, wingman, jokester. He was the calming presence in the midst of chaos. He had a sixth sense about it: he knew when you were off your game and he would do anything in his power to make you right again. –Obituary

Related Links:
Obituary: Sgt. Calvin W. Aguilar
A canine’s farewell: Soldiers pay tribute to faithful working dog
It’s a dog’s life after Army retirement
It’s a dog’s life after Army retirement
‘Every one of them is a hero’: Group helps working dogs retire with dignity
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier
Fort Hood officials ID soldier found dead in Copperas Cove
Fort Hood announces death of a soldier in Cove
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead identified
Deceased Fort Hood Soldier Identified
Fort Hood military police sergeant found dead
Ft. Hood identifies Soldier found unresponsive last week
Army to investigate mistreatment claims by injured, ill soldiers at Fort Hood
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas
Reunion of MWD Nico P432 and his former handler, Calvin Aguilar, together again (YouTube)
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

“Retiring MWD Nico P432 (U.S. Army) is reunited with battle buddy SGT. Calvin Aguilar. After serving together in Afghanistan, they were apart for one year. Aguilar adopted Nico, and Mission K9 Rescue raised the funds for Nico to be shipped from Weisbaden, Germany to Texas.”

On This Day, Army Staff Sgt. Miguel Colonvazquez Died in a Flash Flood Training Accident at Fort Hood in Texas (June 2, 2016)

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Staff Sgt. Miguel Colonvazquez, US Army

Army Staff Sgt. Miguel Angel Colonvazquez, 38, whose home of record is listed as Brooklyn, New York, entered active-duty military service in July 2003 as a motor transport operator and was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas since May 2011. Colonvazquez deployed to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom from September 2005 to September 2006 and in support of Operation New Dawn from May 2011 to November 2011. He also deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom from March 2008 to May 2009 and from July 2013 to March 2014.

Colonvazquez’s awards and decorations include five Army Commendation Medals, five Army Achievement Medals, three Army Good Conduct Medals, National Defense Service Medal, Afghanistan Campaign Medal with campaign star, Iraq Campaign Medal with campaign star, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, two Korea Defense Service Medals, Army Service Ribbon, three Overseas Service Ribbons, North Atlantic Treaty Organization Medal, Driver and Mechanic Badge with wheeled vehicle and Marksmanship Qualification Badge-Marksman with Carbine.

Learn more from III Corps and Fort Hood Facebook page here.

For more information: On This Day, Eight Army Soldiers & One West Point Cadet Died in a Flash Flood Training Accident at Fort Hood in Texas (June 2, 2016)

Related Links:
SSGT Miguel Angel Colonvazquez (1997-2016)
Flash flooding kills 9 | Fort Hood Sentinel
The Faces of the Fort Hood Tragedy
Profiles of the Fort Hood Soldiers Tragically Killed By Texas Flooding
Fort Hood Flood Victims: Photos to Remember the Fallen Soldiers
Fort Hood memorial held for drowned soldiers
Community mourns soldiers killed in accident
Killeen: Fort Hood soldier killed in training accident laid to rest
Fort Hood Soldier Killed in Training Accident Laid to Rest in Killeen
Soldier from Brooklyn among 9 dead at Fort Hood
Fort Hood soldiers from New York area killed in floods
Brooklyn and Jersey City soldiers among nine killed in risky Fort Hood training accident
2 Fort Hood soldiers who died in Texas floods are from tri-state
2 Local Residents Among Fort Hood Soldiers Killed In Texas Flooding
2 Local Residents Among 9 Fort Hood Soldiers Killed in Training Accident: Records
All Flags to Fly at Half-Staff Effective Today in Honor of Staff Sergeant Miguel Colon-Vazquez
Miguel Colon-Vazquez, Brooklyn soldier who drowned in Texas, honored with flags at half-staff
Flags to Fly at Half-Staff in Honor of Staff Sergeant Miguel Colon-Vazquez
Fort Hood Soldier Laid to Rest
Funeral Services Held in Killeen for Fort Hood Soldier Killed in Training Accident
State troopers, Patriot Guard Riders escort Fort Hood soldier to local funeral home
Graveside service and burial for Staff Sgt. Miguel Angel Colon Vasquez
Thousands honor Fort Hood fallen Soldiers
Brooklyn family of Fort Hood soldier killed speaks out
Fallen soldiers honored with flowers on Fort Hood
1 year since 9 died at Fort Hood
9 remembered on anniversary of deaths
Fort Hood: Anniversary of deaths of 9 soldiers passes quietly
Families remember the 9 who died in 2016 training accident
Families continue to grieve one year after nine die in flooding on Fort Hood
‘They never should have been out there’: Fort Hood soldier’s father struggles to understand deadly disaster
Army Soldiers at Fort Hood in Texas Are Dying at Alarming Rates Stateside
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas (US Army)
Military Policy & Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, & Suicide of US Service Members (2016)
Washington DC Veteran’s Presentation on the Current Status of the Armed Forces at Fort Hood in Texas (2017)
75 Fort Hood Soldiers Died Since January 2016: 7 Overseas Deaths, 3 Non Combat; 68 Stateside Deaths, 34 ‘Suicides’, 1 Unsolved Homicide (2018)
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook
The Fort Hood Nine | Ted Poe | Medium
The Fort Hood, Texas, Nine | Congressman Ted Poe

Investigation:
‘Apathetic Safety Mentality’ Cited in Fort Hood Wreck That Killed 9
‘Apathetic Safety Mentality’ Cited In Fort Hood Wreck That Killed 9
Safety ‘Apathy’ Blamed in Accident at Texas’ Ft. Hood That Killed 9 US Soldiers
Army: Warning issued before 9 died in Fort Hood floodwaters
Army Issued Warning Before 9 Died in Fort Hood Floodwaters
Report: Fort Hood truck crash blamed on driver
NCO blamed for accident that killed nine soldiers at Fort Hood
Army blames staff sergeant for fatal Fort Hood truck accident
Fort Hood truck crash that killed 9 blamed on staff sergeant
Widow disputes investigation results blaming husband for Fort Hood accident
Army report on fatal Fort Hood training largely redacted
Herald asks Army to reveal investigation findings withheld from public
Reports still raise questions about Fort Hood accident two years later
Former platoon sergeant was on leave during the rollover accident, yet found at fault
Survivor of 2016 Fort Hood training accident recalls flood
Survivor of 2016 Fort Hood training accident recalls flood
2 years later: Survivor of fatal Fort Hood water training accident speaks out

Congressman Ted Poe (R-TX):

Mr. Speaker, Texas has been hammered by historic torrential rain and flooding. As the Texas floodwaters rose, 12 soldiers from Fort Hood, Texas, were crossing Owl Creek in a 21⁄2-ton Light Medium Tactical Vehicle when it became stuck in the Owl Creek low water crossing.

Suddenly, the vehicle was swept over and sent downstream by fast-moving water. Nine American soldiers drowned in the massive flood waters. Today, we remember them, and here they are: Staff Sergeant Miguel Colon Vazquez, 38, from New York.

He had just spent four tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan; Specialist Christine Armstrong, 27, of California; PFC Brandon Banner, 22, of Florida; PFC Zachery Fuller, 23, of Florida; Private Isaac Deleon, 19, of Texas. He was the youngest of all of them.

He had only been in the Army for 17 months; Private Eddy Rae’Laurin Gates, 20, of North Carolina—a former homecoming queen; Private Tysheena James, 21, of New Jersey; West Point cadet Mitchell Winey, 21, of Indiana; Specialist Yingming Sun, 25, of California. These are the nine who drowned recently in the Texas floods.

The soldiers were members of the 3rd Battalion, 16th Field Artillery Regiment, 2nd Armored Brigade Combat Team of the 1st Cavalry Division. These American soldiers were volunteers who swore to protect the United States.

They were a cut above the rest and were ready to defend freedom at home and abroad. Their lives were ripped from this world and their families all too soon. We are grateful for them and their families for their service and their sacrifices.

These soldiers are the best of America. Our thoughts and prayers are with the soldiers and their families, who have been devastated by the floods of Texas this spring.

Fort Hood Army Soldier Sgt. John Stobbe Found Dead at Off-Post Residence in Killeen, Texas (May 1, 2016)

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Sgt. John Stobbe, US Army

Army Sgt. John ‘Drew’ Stobbe, 31, was found dead at his off-post residence on May 1, 2016 in Killeen, Texas. At the time of reporting, the Army indicated the incident was under investigation. Sgt. Stobbe’s home of record is listed as Beaverton, Oregon; he joined the Army in September 2004. Sgt. Stobbe was an M1 armor crewman assigned to the 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood. He deployed three times to Iraq in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation New Dawn: December 2005 to November 2006, June 2008 to May 2009, and September 2010 to August 2011. The circumstances surrounding his death and official cause of death are unknown.

He was a proud and capable Sergeant in the US Army, serving his country for over 11 years. Trained as a tanker, Drew loved the power and maneuverability of the M1-A2 Abrams tanks. He was a skillful instructor and respected leader of his crews. His service included three tours in Iraq and foreign posts in Germany and South Korea. He was stationed at Fort Hood, Texas at the time of his death. His abrupt and unforeseen death will not define Drew’s life or memory. While he left us all too early for reasons that elude our understanding, he knows the peace and love of our savior, Jesus Christ. In a very real sense, Drew was always ‘public property’ a child, boy, and man who loved all and was beloved by all. –Obituary

Related Link:
Obituary: John Andrew “Drew” Stobbe
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier
Beaverton Soldier Found Dead
Fort Hood identifies soldier found dead off-post
Fort Hood soldier found dead in Killeen identified
Highly decorated Beaverton soldier found dead
Beaverton soldier found unresponsive in his Texas home, cause of death unknown
Why Have So Many Fort Hood Army Soldiers Died Stateside in the Last Year?
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

Fort Hood Army Soldier SSG Steven Lewis Died of Self Inflicted Wound at Off-Post Residence in Killeen, Texas (2016)

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Staff Sgt. Steven Lewis, US Army

Army Staff Sgt. Steven Lewis, 33, was found dead in his off-post residence in Killeen, Texas on March 22, 2016. According to reports, the Killeen police department said Lewis’ wound was self-inflicted. He was working as an intelligence specialist and assigned to the 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood. Lewis deployed to Iraq twice from November 2008 to September 2009 and again from December 2010 to October 2011. His home of record was Tulare, California. He first joined the Navy in 2002 and later joined the Army in 2007; he had been stationed at Fort Hood since 2013.

Related Links:
Fort Hood Press Center: SSG Steven D. Lewis
Fort Hood soldier found dead at home in Killeen
Fort Hood identifies soldier found dead off-post
Fort Hood: Soldier found dead in off-post residence identified
Ft Hood soldier found dead, unresponsive in off post home
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook

Army SSG Devin Schuette Found Dead in Vehicle at Recreation Area Near Fort Hood; CID Ruled Suicide, Spouse Requests Independent Investigation (January 3, 2016)

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SSG Devin Schuette, US Army

SSG Devin Schuette, 35, U.S. Army, originally of Clovis, New Mexico, was found dead inside a car near the recreation area at Fort Hood on January 3, 2016. According to his family, he had been missing since New Year’s Day. SSG Schuette’s service with the Army began in April 1999 as an infantryman and he was serving as an Intelligence Analyst with the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division at Fort Hood at the time of his death. He also served three overseas tours as part of Operation Iraqi Freedom; his deployments were from March 2003 to March 2004, November 2005 to October 2006 and June 2008 to June 2009. As of January 6, 2016, the Criminal Investigation Division was investigating the circumstances surrounding the incident. At the time of reporting, they did not suspect any foul play but were not ruling anything out as they moved forward with the investigation.

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Three weeks prior to his disappearance, Devin Schuette was diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). On January 3, 2016, Devin was found dead on Liberty Hill road close to the paintball course at Belton Lake Outdoor Recreation Area (BLORA) near Fort Hood. The Army Criminal Investigation Division (CID) ruled the death a suicide.

Moments Leading Up to Disappearance

Tannie was asleep at her on post home at Fort Hood when she woke up to Devin yelling at their daughter. Devin was asking her if she wanted to go to a friend’s house but she didn’t want to leave the house. Tannie asked him what his problem was and why he was insistent on their daughter going to a friend’s house. At the same time, she realized their oldest daughter and youngest son were already at a friend’s house after Devin urged them to go. Devin went outside to cool down after the encounter and started loading some pallets in the back of his truck.

After Devin completed the task, he drove around to the back of the house and began unloading the pallets. Tannie was concerned that the pallets would leave rusty nails in the backyard where the kids played so she asked Devin to take them back to the carport area. Tannie helped Devin load the pallets back up and in the process threw a piece of wood that broke the front windshield on the passenger’s side of Devin’s truck. Devin returned to the carport and asked their daughter if she wanted to help him build a doghouse. She agreed to help him after her and Tannie got back from getting some coffee nearby on post.

When Tannie returned to the house, Devin was gone but her son was home. Her son told her that as he was walking home, he saw Devin pass by in his truck. He waved at him but said that it appeared Devin didn’t see him because he didn’t wave back. The family assumed he was looking for more wood to build the doghouse with. But after he was gone for awhile, the family started getting concerned. Tannie’s phone had broke so she asked the neighbor if she could use their phone to call Devin. Devin answered the phone and said he was driving around Copperas Cove…and then the line went dead.

Tannie asked to use her friend’s phone and then jumped in her car to go looking for Devin. After awhile, her friend asked Tannie if she would bring her phone back so she did and asked her friend to get in touch with her if Devin calls. But first, Tannie called the Fort Hood military police and they sent an officer out to her home. Tannie tried to convey to them that this is not typical of Devin because he always says he loves her before they hang up. And Devin hates ending calls abruptly. The Fort Hood military police told her she has to wait 24 hours before she could make an official missing person’s report.

Reported Missing to Fort Hood After 24 Hour Waiting Period

Tannie wasn’t going to waste anytime looking for Devin when she knew in her gut that something was wrong with the way their phone call ended. She quickly got on social media to ask her local community and Devin’s co-workers for help looking for him. Tannie’s mom and sister drove great distances to help search for him. Tannie drove to where their camper was stored at the Belton Lake Outdoor Recreation Area. She didn’t have a key because Devin had the only key but she knocked and looked for his truck. After the twenty-four hour waiting requirement, Tannie filed a formal missing person’s report with the Fort Hood military police. They pinged his phone and found the location of where the phone was last active rather quickly but nobody contacted Tannie until the following day.

Tannie received an e-mail from Devin’s NCO (boss) with the general location of where the phone was located on Sunday, January 3rd. The phone pinged in a fifteen mile radius located in the Belton Lake Outdoor Recreation Area. Devin went missing on Friday night, January 1st, Tannie made a formal missing person’s report to the Fort Hood military police on Saturday, January 2nd, and didn’t hear from anyone at Fort Hood until Sunday. Meanwhile, she and many other’s were frantically driving all over the place looking for Devin. U.S. Army W.T.F! moments shared the missing information and that’s when they saw a real social media response including search teams. As soon as they got the general location of where the phone pinged, the search teams began focusing on that area.

Initially everyone focused on searching the left side of the road within that 15 mile radius in BLORA. At 4 pm that same day, Tannie headed back to the Hobby Lobby where she met up with others and they headed to the K-Mart parking lot where there was a huge tent set up as a command post. There were a lot of people there when she arrived and she wasn’t sure if they were all civilians or if some of them were soldiers too. At the tent there was a map with grids. Each pair of searchers was assigned a grid. After they got done searching the left side, they searched the right side of the road. As Tannie was searching, she passed Liberty Hill road, a road that goes to the paintball course at BLORA. Tannie thought about going down Liberty Hill road but something stopped her and she decided not to. Then about five miles outside of the post, Tannie pulled over and parked her car when they saw a man with a flashlight walking down the road.

The man approached them while Tannie was talking to an embedded reporter who wanted to do a story about her missing husband. So Tannie’s mom and sister went to go talk to him. They returned to Tannie and reported the man was very drunk and he said he was looking for a friend’s truck. The pair also observed blood on his clothing and blood spatter on his face. They informed Tannie while she was giving the reporter a brief so she stopped what she was doing and called 911. They wanted to go after him and confront him but were scared and freaked out. Tannie and her family observed him walking away towards a truck with a flat bed trailer on it. When they took off, they were hauling ass.

Eventually the game warden and military police showed up. Tannie and her family shared their observations about the drunk man with blood on him. The police started looking in the area and eventually a game warden did in fact find this mysterious man. The game warden told Tannie the man was a cattle rancher and the blood on his face was from a cut above his eye. The blood had dripped down on his face. Fort Hood uses land for training owned by the Texas Cattle Rancher’s Association therefore this provided the man with an excuse for why he was near the post. Tannie felt like they missed an opportunity to investigate by giving him a reason to be there (negated a means) and made an excuse for the blood spatter (ignored important forensic evidence). They could have at the very least taken a picture as evidence given the fact they were searching for a missing soldier.

Devin Schuette Found Near Paintball Course at BLORA

Tannie reports that she found out Devin was deceased after a man from her church called her while she was on her way to the location with his Commander. This man from church and another male volunteer she didn’t know found Devin deceased in his truck on Liberty Hill road off a little dirt road to the left. It was the first dirt road on the left. He was found about 100 yards from Liberty Hill road which is where the BLORA paintball course is located. Tannie immediately began to wonder what Devin was doing there. Why was he down that road to begin with? Was he by himself?

The Commander may have found out about Devin when she did because he wasn’t the one to tell her. When they arrived at the location, the military police started directing each other to silence their radios as the Commander was approaching them. Tannie wanted to go see Devin but the military police wouldn’t let her see him or go near the truck. Instead, the military police detained Tannie and began questioning her. They asked her, her mom, and sister if they saw anything, did they see him in the truck, did they touch the crime scene? Tannie felt like the investigators were treating them like criminals.

After the interrogation, Tannie started walking towards Liberty Hill road where Devin’s Commander was waiting for her. Her vehicle was parked on the side of the dirt road where Devin was found. She was held at gun point and asked to stop as an ambulance was arriving with their lights and sirens on. They were arriving on the scene and driving towards Devin. Tannie was startled and traumatized, and if seeing her husband wasn’t allowed, she wanted to get back home to comfort her children. They unfortunately learned their dad was found deceased on social media. Tannie observed that the Army CID and coroner didn’t show up until after she left the scene.

Tannie was sleeping with her children when she heard a knock at the door at 1 a.m. on Monday, January 4th. She answered the door and it was Devin’s First Sergeant and an Army Chaplain there to inform her that Devin was officially ruled deceased by the coroner. Tannie admits that she went off on Devin’s First Sergeant because while everyone was on leave, Devin talked to him about his medical issues including Post Traumatic Stress. Not long after they left, two military police showed up to get an official statement from Tannie and Tannie said no because she just found out her husband died. She told them they could come back tomorrow.

The Fort Hood Investigation of Devin Schuette

The next day, a Casualty Assistance Officer (CAO) came to her home as did the Army CID investigators. CID questioned her and she gave them the same story she gave the military police the night before. During the questioning, they accused Tannie of being hostile because Tannie told them they didn’t do everything they could to find Devin and they weren’t doing their job. A couple days later, CID called Tannie into their office to read Devin’s suicide note. Tannie questioned the note in the presence of military personnel and observed that it did not look like Devin’s handwriting. The lettering on this note was enlarged but Devin didn’t write big like that.

Eight months later, Tannie would receive the Army CID investigation package and find a different letter that was on different paper (green military issued notebook paper) and did contain handwriting similar to Devin, unlike the first one she read. The investigation report revealed even more inconsistencies and things that didn’t add up. For example, the investigation package said there were beer cans located in Devin’s truck but the Army did not include the beer cans when they returned Devin’s truck (these beer cans could have valuable evidence on them). Where are they? The investigation package did not include the autopsy report. Where is the autopsy report? It is unknown if a toxicology report was done to confirm if there was a blood alcohol level in Devin’s system.

Devin was taking medication at the time of his disappearance. He was taking effexor, gabapentin, and hydrocodone for the pain from a spinal infusion surgery. Tannie observed another discrepancy when she read in the investigation package that Devin’s medication levels were appropriate given the dosage, but Devin missed a couple days before he died. Tannie believes Devin died on Sunday, January 3rd, shortly before the volunteers found him. One of the volunteers tested Devin for a pulse and observed that he was still warm to the touch. This meant to Tannie that rigor mortis most likely hadn’t set in yet because it takes upwards of twelve hours. Tannie also shared that she learned a stiff body will begin to relax after about 48-72 hours of rigor mortis. Was an official time of death ever determined?

Tannie Schuette Feeling Betrayed by the System

Tannie reflected on her experience with Fort Hood. What concerned her the most is that Devin’s command was never planning on searching for him. Their plan was to consider him Absent without Leave (AWOL) if he didn’t show up to work on Monday, January 4th. The volunteers who found Devin gave her a description of what they witnessed at the scene. One was prior military and he too was questioned by the Army CID about what he witnessed. Tannie spoke to him after his interview with CID and he shared that Devin had blood coming from both legs and blood coming from his left forearm. Tannie also learned that Devin looked out of it.

Tannie was told that Devin died from asphyxiation so why was there blood everywhere? There was blood on Devin. There was blood on a blanket. And there was blood in the seat of the driver’s side of his truck. She also learned that the truck was still running and the heat was on full blast. Tannie theorizes that the blood on Devin’s forearm could be defensive wounds from protecting himself from an attacker. Tannie also thinks that a laceration on the back of his hand is consistent with defensive wounds. The blood droplets on Devin’s face could be consistent with head trauma from a knife. Tannie read in the investigation report that Devin had nine ‘self-inflicted’ stab wounds but none of them were life-threatening.

Devin’s truck was eventually returned to Tannie. She observed knife cuts on the door panel on the driver’s side and on the left shoulder area of the passenger seat. Of course Army CID denies her theories because they apparently investigated the scene as a suicide, not a homicide. This is evidenced by the fact that the Army left the truck sitting out in the elements until they returned it to Tannie. Therefore, what is considered valuable evidence to Tannie wasn’t safeguarded while in their custody. Tannie also noted that before Devin began working with the pallets, he had chopped up vegetables for a new beer can chicken recipe he wanted to try on Friday night. All the prep work was done but they were out of propane. Maybe Devin went to the camper to get propane. A propane tank was found in the cab of the truck so Tannie thought maybe he went to their camper to get the propane tank.

Tannie learned that a bloody blanket and a sewage pipe hose from the camper was also in Devin’s truck. Tannie knew about the sewage pipe hose in the bed of Devin’s truck. Tannie would also learn that in addition to the stab wounds on Devin, he allegedly hooked the sewage pipe hose from the tailpipe of his truck to the opening in the back window of the truck. The opening around the pipe in the back window was sealed with the bloody blanket. In addition to the hose running from the tailpipe to the back window, they found the propane tank sitting in the cab of the truck with the nozzle wide open. The emergency line had been cut allowing the propane gas to escape. Devin knew the propane tanks at the camper were low on fuel.

Tannie’s head has been spinning with theories since the death of her husband. The crime scene description given to her by the volunteers, the CID investigative report, and the evidence she has personally witnessed and still has in her possession do not add up. The Army CID wants Tannie to believe that Devin committed suicide. Tannie is to believe that her husband who left the house to maybe get propane for dinner and was planning on building a doghouse, took off for a couple days and then killed himself. In the end, according to the investigative report, Devin stabbed himself nine times, ran a hose from his tailpipe through the back window of his truck, and put the propane tank he needed for his meal on wide open in an attempt to blow the truck up? If the blanket was bloody, does that mean it was used to seal the window after the self-inflicted stabbing was unsuccessful?

Why would Devin change his mind about dying by self inflicted stabbing and then hook up the sewage pipe so that he could die by carbon monoxide? Was there a blood trail outside the truck? How common is it to stab yourself while dying by carbon dioxide and propane fuel? Is it possible that he was wrapped up in the blanket during the course of a stabbing frenzy by a known or unknown attacker? Tannie believes all these discrepancies alone warrant an independent investigation and ultimately she wants her husband’s death investigated as a murder. It doesn’t add up with his plans for that evening with dinner and the doghouse. It doesn’t add up when you read through the reports and compare the narrative to the witnesses first hand testimony and the evidence found on Devin’s belongings and his vehicle.

Tannie Schuette Wants Truth & Justice for Her Husband Devin

Tannie believes her husband was murdered and she wants justice for Devin. She feels that he was most likely stabbed and knocked out with a head injury. She believes the attacker was most likely known to Devin because the nine stab wounds were overkill. In other stabbing cases, the attacker quickly realizes that sometimes it can take multiple stabs to kill someone. It is up close and personal. And in this case, if Devin was knocked out, this person could have easily set up the scene to look like a suicide to cover up a murder. As soon as Devin lost conscienceness yet still wasn’t dead after nine stab wounds, the attacker was most likely tired. If the attacker was someone on the post, they were most likely motivated by the fact that the Army wants to rule deaths on post as suicides. This is evidenced by the multiple suspicious deaths at Fort Hood over the last couple years starting with Devin Schuette.

If you do the research, you will learn that it is very rare for those who are suicidal to stab themselves let alone use carbon monoxide and propane fuel. You will find that if they do die by stabbing, there are multiple hesitation cuts and maybe even some cutting prior to the act itself. It takes great strength to stab yourself through the bones, muscle, and cartilage in the chest area in order to kill yourself. Multiple stab wounds are more likely to come from an attacker than inflicted on yourself. Defensive wounds help tell the story. Lastly, Devin was affected by an attempted suicide in the family. The whole family was affected by it and are thankful this family member is alive today. Devin knew the devastation it caused the family and that alone made him mindful of the aftermath of suicide.

A propane tank was recovered at the scene. Tannie doesn’t know if Devon fetched this propane tank from their camper. And if he did, he knew all their propane tanks were low on fuel so why use it as an alternative way to kill himself? What was the point of the propane tank in the suicide equation? Was the vehicle running, the heat on full blast and the propane tank on wide open an attempt to create an explosion? The Army CID said they finger printed the truck but found no good prints. None? Really, not even Devin and his family members as if the vehicle was wiped clean inside and out? How is that possible? Why would Devin wipe prints clean from the truck? What’s the motivation to wipe prints in a suicide? The Army CID told Tannie they didn’t fingerprint Devin’s phone. They said it was located under the passenger’s seat but in pictures it was on the passenger seat. The knife was also in the passenger seat in photos but Tannie says the Army CID told her the knife was in Devin’s hands. Tannie’s thinking “these people are supposed to be professionals?”

If Tannie can find this many holes and discrepancies in the investigation report and her conversations with Army CID versus what witnesses observed and physical evidence reveals, how good was this investigation to begin with? Was it simply investigated as a suicide and homicide was never even considered? Tannie believes the system is a vocabulary manipulation from the beginning to end. Tannie learned after connecting with other family members that she’s not the only one questioning suicide as the cause of death at Fort Hood but the investigators tell everyone the same thing. And to add insult to injury, some family members were not allowed to view the body at the funeral home. As a matter of fact, Devin’s body was guarded by Army personnel as well to prevent anyone from looking at the body. Tannie shared that the funeral director opened Devin’s casket for her late one night in what felt like a secretive mission. This is when she observed Devin was wrapped up like a mummy. No foul play suspected?

The Army’s Response is Always the Same

Tannie considered going to the media with her concerns but is afraid that again, the news agencies will create a narrative based on the Army’s version of events and not tell the whole story. She knows they only have so much space and in order for the reader to understand the totality of the circumstances, they need all the information, not a sixteenth of it wrapped up with canned responses from the public affairs office at Fort Hood. This is about finding the truth and justice for Devin not creating a narrative that continues to make the institution look like the authority on these issues. The families deserve a space to tell their truth.

Tannie lives with the memories of Devin hanging up pictures and settling into their home on post, Devin chopping up vegetables so he could make them a new recipe the night he disappeared, Devin wanting to build a doghouse with his kids, and Devin taking care of his health in an effort to get better and continue his career in the Army. Tannie has known Devin since she was twelve years old. They grew up together and were friends long before they started a relationship. As a matter of fact, Devin was best friend’s with Tannie’s oldest brother. Devin and Tannie were in a committed relationship for twelve years when he died. Tannie probably knows Devin better than anyone and ultimately she is the authority.

Tannie thinks Devin may have left the house to get propane at the camper. He was probably taking a ride to get some peace which may be why he wanted the kids to go play and visit with their friends. Devin went through an attempted suicide with Tannie’s family. The family member almost died but someone found him just in time. This family member was in the ICU for a month and Devin comforted his best friend and his wife through the ordeal. Tannie shared that Devin reached out to his command with his medical concerns right before Christmas leave. He talked to his First Sergeant for about an hour. What if he told him something that was a red flag? Did the First Sergeant now see him as a problem and no longer useful to the team?

So Many Unanswered Questions & Things That Don’t Add Up

Why did the Army CID clear out Devin’s phone so Tannie couldn’t see what happened in the days leading up to his death? Tannie knew Devin didn’t wipe his phone or delete things because he wasn’t very good with computers or the phone. They joked about how he referred to himself as a ‘dumb grunt’ who let the soldiers who are geniuses do that stuff. Devin didn’t even know how to erase history but the history was cleared. Tannie reports the Army CID has no desire to get a warrant to obtain the cell phone records that could tell a digital story. Did he chat with others? Did he make any phone calls? Was his phone active the entire time? Did at some point the battery die? Did he do any google searches?

All of these things are relevant to the investigation. As a matter of a fact, any conversations prior to his death could lead one to persons of interests and witnesses. Was he lured to Liberty Hill road? Was he supposed to meet someone? Where was he for two days? These are all logical questions when trying to figure out the victimology; their own words, thoughts, and behaviors tie into the investigation. Tannie feels defeated after realizing it appeared the Army didn’t want to do the work to find Devin or find out what happened to him. Most of the Army personnel involved in this case can’t even look at her and appear to get defensive when she questions them.

Tannie feels like the Army gives families just enough momentary satisfaction and then does something else to distract them. Tannie believes Army investigators create a narrative. She feels like Army personnel give them answers that will suppress any further questions. Some families want all the details to know how it fits together. It’s normal to want to know what happened to your loved one. It’s normal to want to see the body of your loved one. It’s inhumane to keep a family from seeing the body of their loved one even if they can’t have an open casket. Currently, the Army decides whether it is open casket or not, whether the family can see the body or not, and if questioned, will make sure there are Army personnel at the funeral home to ensure families don’t see the body. Why wasn’t a family member asked to identify the body?

Why Does the US Army Control the Funeral Arrangements?

Army CID told Tannie Devin’s body was too far gone therefore no open casket. But Tannie knew that wasn’t true given how quickly they found Devin after he died. Decomposition was not an issue at this time. She wondered “what are they hiding?” Who goes to those kinds of lengths to keep you from seeing the body of your loved one? Everyone was denied access to see Devin’s body. And anyone that did see his body was hauled into Army CID. Tannie wanted to see that her husband was in that casket. Even the funeral director questioned the Army’s decision to have a closed casket and no viewing of the body. He told Tannie there was nothing wrong with the body. They learned the request came from the Department of the Army in Washington DC.

Department of Army told the Army CID and the CAO it was to be a closed casket and that was that. Some families may not want the details and that’s okay. Both ways are okay but for a family that gets inconsistencies throughout the process, wanting to know the truth and getting justice for their loved one is paramount. Soldiers may have learned not to question the institution but by no means does a family member or a veteran have to accept their canned responses and narratives. Tannie wants Devin’s death investigated and the case solved if in fact this is a homicide. And after what she has learned from other families it appears suspicious that when a soldier admits to medical issues they then become a problem and die?

Tannie has every right to be concerned that anyone who admits to issues like Post Traumatic Stress may be picked on, isolated, can’t do anything right, hazed, belittled, and more. After awhile, the soldier may even start believing they are a piece of shit. What kind of response did Devin get when he told his Command about his medical issues? Tannie says none of the programs at Fort Hood are working and it’s all a big waste of money. She admits that she too sought the assistance of counselors at Fort Hood but they didn’t appear to deal well with her candidness and openness. She was processing the confusing death of her beloved husband, they sat there in silence not acknowledging the toxic environment they are a part of.

Areas of Concern:

  • Waiting to report that a soldier is missing, yet lists them AWOL
  • Family knows when there is a cause for concern
  • If piece of equipment goes missing, then lockdown
  • When child or elder goes missing, it’s taken seriously
  • If a soldier goes missing, consider serious especially if there if previously noted mental health diagnosis or concerns
  • If a soldier visits mental health, are they treated differently because of the visit and/or the diagnosis?
  • How many cases have we witnessed where a soldier has gone missing, but is considered AWOL, yet later show up dead?
  • Has anyone considered that it’s hurts a man’s pride to go AWOL because they are suffering from some kind of mental health breakdown?
  • Men, especially military men, are trained to think “I’m not supposed to be weak”
  • Spouse felt like CID investigation report did not reflect her account of what happened, report had lots of discrepancies, and she felt dismissed as if they were not even listening to her; they said photos in report blacked out Devin’s body to protect her
  • Do the Texas Rangers have jurisdiction of the land owned by the Cattle Rancher’s Association? If so, will they conduct an investigation alongside, not with, Fort Hood investigators?
  • Did the Commander coordinate with the military police located at the scene? If so, is it protocol to point a gun at a military spouse who just found out her husband was dead?
  • Why did Tannie’s children learn about their dad’s death on social media? How did this happen? How can we prevent it from happening again?
  • Why was the bloody handprint on Devin’s clothing not significant to investigators? Why was it not tested?
  • It appears they did no forensic testing at all. If so, why did they rule a suicide?
  • Tannie observed that the first note she was allowed to read in the presence of military personnel was not the same note found in official investigative report
  • Tannie observed the handwriting on the first suicide note did not look like Devin’s handwriting; the handwriting on the second suicide note did look like Devin’s but was ruled inconclusive
  • Tannie questioned the Army CID about the note found in the official investigative report because this one did look like Devin’s handwriting, unlike the first note she read a couple days after he died; she also observed the second note was on different paper and wanted to know how they could account for the discrepancies; Where is the original note? How do we get it released for forensic examination?
  • Tannie received pictures of the crime scene that were blacked out to protect her; she wants copies of the original pictures to help make an assessment between what the volunteers witnessed at the scene versus what the Army CID is telling her; again, why the inconsistencies?
  • Is it possible the truck’s heater was on full blast to affect decomposition rate?
  • Is it possible to create an explosion with a propane tank leak, carbon monoxide leak, a heater blasting on high, and a vehicle running? An explosion would destroy evidence?
  • Some families may benefit from doing a FOIA for medical records and all families should FOIA the investigation report for the cause of death ruling
  • Where is the autopsy report? The autopsy report should be included with every investigation package. Does the family have to make a separate FOIA request?
  • Why does the Army get to decide whether or not the family views the body of their loved one? Why does the Army get to decide if open casket or not?

Source: Tannie Schuette (Devin Schuette’s wife)

“One of the most difficult situations I have ever faced in my life. Please share this video with everyone and anyone you can.” -Devin Schuette

Related Links:
Obituary: SSG Devin L. Schuette
Man found dead at Fort Hood
Army IDs soldier found dead at Fort Hood
Soldier found dead at Fort Hood identified
Soldier found dead on Fort Hood identified
Soldier who was found dead at Fort Hood identified
Fort Hood officials ID soldier who was found dead at BLORA
New Mexico man found dead at Fort Hood
Fort Hood: Clovis soldier found dead
Soldier who died at Fort Hood was from Clovis
Death of a Fort Hood Soldier: Staff Sgt. Devin Lee Schuette
Staff Sgt. Devin L. Schuette, 35, of Fort Hood died Sunday, Jan. 3
Dead soldier identified as Clovis native; Investigation continues
Army continues investigation into death of Clovis soldier
Army Soldiers at Fort Hood in Texas Are Dying at Alarming Rates Stateside
Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Fort Hood, Texas (US Army)
73 Fort Hood Soldiers Died Since January 2016: 4 Insider Attacks & 2 Suicides Overseas; 67 Stateside Deaths Including 34 Alleged Suicides & 1 Unsolved Homicide
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members
The Fort Hood Fallen on Facebook
From My Heart to Yours (YouTube)
Military Spouse and Widow Tannie Schuette Live Facebook (video)

Violent Crime, Suicide, and Non Combat Death at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska (Army & Air Force)

Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson

*Research not complete

Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson: On July 30, 2010, the 673d Air Base Wing activated as the host wing combining installation management functions of Elmendorf Air Force Base’s 3rd Wing and U.S. Army Garrison Fort Richardson and consists of four groups that operate and maintain the Joint Base for air sovereignty, combat training, force staging and through output operations in support of worldwide contingencies. The installation hosts the headquarters for the United States Alaskan Command, 11th Air Force, U.S. Army Alaska, and the Alaskan North American Aerospace Defense Command Region. The 673 ABW comprises of 5,500 joint military and civilian personnel, supporting America’s Arctic Warriors and their families. The wing supports and enables three Air Force total-force wings, two Army brigades and 75 associate and tenant units.

Esteban Santiago, Alaska Army National Guard (2017): Shooting Rampage Inside Fort Lauderdale Airport

Shareef Abdullah, US Army (2015): Convicted of of sexual assault and abusive sexual contact; reduced to E-1, confined for six years, and dishonorably discharged.

Alexander Denson, US Army (2015): Convicted of false official statement, aggravated sexual assault, assault with force likely to produce death or grievous bodily harm, simple assault and communicating a threat; reduced to E-1, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, confined for 68 months, and bad-conduct discharge.

Frederick Jenkins III, US Army (2015): Fatal Motorcycle Crash

Dakota Simmons, US Army (2015): Convicted of willfully disobeying a superior commissioned officer and assault consummated by a battery upon a child under the age of 16; confined for 34 months and 15 days and bad-conduct discharge.

Jeremiah Smith, US Army (2015): Convicted of failure to obey a regulation and false official statement; acquitted of maltreatment and abusive sexual contact; reduced to E-7.

Timothy Worlds, US Army (2015): Convicted of aggravated assault and assault consummated by a battery; acquitted of sexual assault and maiming; reduced to E-1, confined for 23 months and bad-conduct discharge.

Okan Cetinbag, US Army (2014): Died of Gunshot Wound; Cause of Death Unknown

Samuel Davis, USAF (2014): Medical, Died from Complications after Back Surgery

Lagina Griffiths, Civilian (2014)
ER woman arrested for sexual assault
APD Arrests Woman for Sexual Assault, Coercion Against Airman
Woman charged with sex assault of airman
Sexual assault case involving airman shocking even to Anchorage police
Woman sexually assaulted sleeping airman, police say
Woman Accused of Sex Assault Against Airman Changes Plea
Anchorage woman sentenced for sexual assault
Alleged blackmailer sentenced for sexual assault
Eagle River woman sentenced to 4 years for sex assault of US airman
Woman Sentenced to 4 Years in JBER Airman’s Sexual Blackmail

Katrina Jackson, USAF (2014): Died of an Apparent Self-Inflicted Gunshot Wound

Darian Miller, USAF (2014): OSI Investigation, Cause of Death Unknown

Ashley Ard, US Army (2013): Accused of Leaving Baby in Park to Die, Final Disposition Unknown

Tony Earl Bullock Jr, Army (2013)
JBER Soldier Arrested in Armed Rapes of Women

Lane Douglas Wyatt, USAF (2013)
JBER Airman Accused of Drunk Driving Death, Woman Killed
Inside the crash that killed Citari Townes-Sweatt
Family Sues Chilkoot Charlie’s After Daughter Killed in DUI Crash
Man sentenced in 2013 DUI death
Airman gets 18-year sentence in fatal drunken-driving collision
Alaska airman gets 18-year sentence for DUI death
Former Airman sentenced to 18 years in drunken-driving death tells story

Marshall Drake Jr, US Army (2012): Convicted of Involuntary Manslaughter; Sentenced to 11 years, 9 months in Prison
Army Identifies Soldier in JBER Christmas Death
Soldier guilty in barracks killing
Alaska-based soldier found guilty in fellow GI’s shooting death
Soldier gets 12 years in Christmas Day killing at Alaska base
Local soldier gets 12 years for fatal shooting in Alaska
JBER Soldier sentenced for involuntary manslaughter
Ceremony will honor Rochester-area native found dead on Alaska Army base

David Lopez, US Army (2012): Convicted of Murder, Sentenced to 62 Years
Soldier charged with murder
JBER Soldier’s Murder Trial Begins in Wife’s Shooting
Jury deliberates in murder trial of ex-JBER soldier
Former JBER soldier sentenced to 62 years for killing wife
Former JBER soldier receives 63-year sentence in wife’s murder

Sara Lopez, US Army Spouse (2012): Homicide Victim

Jose Nataren, US Army (2012)
Soldier convicted of sexual assault
Soldier gets 12 years for sex assault, adultery
Army Soldier Sentenced to 12 Years in JBER Sexual Assault

Clinton Reeves, US Air Force (2012): Homicide Victim

James Thomas, USAF (2012): Homicide, Sentenced to 32 Years in Prison

Grant Wise, US Army (2012): Homicide Victim

Jacob Brouch, US Army (2011): Not guilty on Manslaughter Charge, Sentenced to Four Months for Weapons Misconduct

Michelle Clark, Alaska Army National Guard (2011): Died of Unknown Causes, Cold Case

Christopher Crosby, US Army (2011): Died of Gunshot Wound in Army Barracks

Michael McCloskey, US Army (2011): Died During Game of Russian Roulette, Jacob Brouch Charged with Manslaughter But Found Not Guilty

Aaron Rentfrow, US Army (2011): Convicted of Pre-Meditated Murder, Strangling

Tonya Rentfrow, US Army Spouse (2011): Homicide Victim

Renee Sinkler, US Army (2011): Killed in a Nighttime Attack, Afghanistan

Kip Lynch, US Army (2010): Convicted of 1st Degree Murder in Raquell Lynch’s Death, 2 Counts of 2nd Degree Murder for Wife & Daughter, Sentenced to 80 Years

Kyirsta Lynch, US Army Dependent (2010): Homicide Victim

Raquell Lynch, US Army Spouse (2010): Homicide Victim

Darryn Andrews, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Bowe Bergdahl, US Army (2009): Went Missing from Base in Afghanistan, Facing Desertion Charges

Clayton Bowen, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Kurt Curtiss, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Matthew Martinek, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Michael Murphrey, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Morris Walker, US Army (2009): Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl

Daniel Sexton, US Army (2008): Died of injuries sustained in non-combat related incident, Iraq

Thomas Tinsley, US Air Force (2008): Death Ruled Suicide by the Air Force 

Johnathan Chism, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Michael Hensley, US Army (2007): Acquitted of premeditated murder; convicted of planting AK-47 and disrespecting a commanding officer; sentenced to time served

Shawn Falter, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Jacob Fritz, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Michael Hullender, US Army (2007): Died of wounds sustained when IED detonated near unit during combat patrol operations

Johnathon Millican, US Army (2007): Abducted and Murdered by the Enemy in Iraq

Trista Moretti, US Army (2007): Died when unit was attacked by insurgents using indirect fire, Iraq

Jorge Sandoval Jr., US Army (2007): Acquitted of Murder in 2 Deaths, Iraq

Colby Umbrell, US Army (2007): Died of wounds suffered when IED detonated near vehicle, Iraq

Brennan Gibson, US Army (2006): Died when Roadside Bomb Struck Humvee

Joseph Strong, US Army (2006): Killed Conducting Mounted Patrol, Iraq

Douglas Tinsley, US Army (2006): Killed Conducting Mounted Patrol, Iraq

Ronnie Gaines, US Army (2000): Pleaded guilty to aggravated assault of Jonathan Walker; sentenced to 8 years in prison and dishonorable discharge

Related Links:
4 U.S. soldiers abducted, killed (2007)
Families of Soldiers Killed in Karbala Cope with Loss (2007)
The 6 U.S. Soldiers Who Died Searching for Bowe Bergdahl (2014)

Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)

Map of Middle East

Bahrain

20 Apr 08: PO1 Cherie Morton, Navy (medical, under investigation)
22 Oct 07: MASN Anamarie Camacho, Navy (gunshot wound, homicide)
22 Oct 07: MASN Genesia Gresham, Navy (gunshot wound, homicide)
1 Oct 07: MASA Shayna Schnell, Navy (injuries sustained in a vehicle accident)
16 Jan 07: MA1 Jennifer Valdivia, Navy (hazed and bullied by supervisor, carbon monoxide poisoning, death ruled suicide by NCIS)
19 Sep 06: LCDR Jane (Lanham) Tafoya, Navy (non-combat related causes)

Jordan

26 Jul 06: CIVILIAN Donna Marie Kerns (vehicle accident)

Kuwait

13 Sep 14: SSG Virginia Caballero, US Army Reserves (medical non-combat death en-route from Kuwait to US)
27 Aug 12: SSG Jessica Wing, Maine Army National Guard (death ruled suicide)
19 Feb 09: Spc Cwislyn Walter, Hawaii Army National Guard (non combat related vehicular accident)
12 Nov 07: Spc Ashley Sietsema, Army (injuries sustained in vehicle accident)
6 Nov 07: Spc Christine Ndururi, Army (medical, unexplained non-combat illness)
1 Oct 06: SSG Denise A Lannaman, New York Army National Guard (gunshot wound, death ruled suicide)
28 Oct 05: 1LT Debra A. (Butler) Banaszak, Missouri Army National Guard (non-combat related injury, death ruled suicide)

The Arabian Gulf

31 Dec 06: SN Sandra Grant, Navy (assigned to USS Dwight D. Eisenhower, medical, cardiac arrest)
18 Apr 02: SN Katrina Grady, Navy (non-combat illness, medically evacuated from USS Port Royal)

The Gulf of Aden/Indian Ocean

12 Feb 07: MA2 Laquita James, Navy (natural causes aboard Bataan off the Horn of Africa)

The Gulf of Oman

18 Jan 11: OS2 Dominique Cruz, Navy (she went missing from aboard the USS Halsey in the Gulf of Oman, found during search and rescue operations Jan. 19 in the Gulf of Oman after being reported missing Jan 18, under investigation)

The Persian Gulf

25 Oct 03: FN Jakia Cannon, Navy (assigned to USS Enterprise, medical, died of natural causes while underway)

Related Links:
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Iraq)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)
Noonie Fortin: Killed in Iraq or in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom
Noonie Fortin: Killed in Afghanistan or in support of Operation Enduring Freedom

Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the U.S. Military (Iraq)

Map of Iraq

    • 111 US women died in Iraq during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)
    • 69 female soldiers considered Combat Death (63%)
    • 41 female soldiers considered Non-Combat Death (37%)
    • 1 civilian journalist from the Boston Globe died in a vehicle accident
    • Non-Combat Death: Homicide, Suicide, Unknown, Accidents, Medical
      • Combat: 69 (63%)
      • Homicide/Suicide/Unknown: 23 (21%)
      • Accidents: 12 (11%)
      • Medical: 6 (5%)
    • 36 of 41 Non-Combat Deaths are in Army (88%) 

Screen Shot 2016-08-11 at 7.42.00 PM

2018
19 Feb 18: Sgt. Christina Schoenecker, U.S. Army (non-combat related incident)

(Editor’s Note: 2018 not included in stats)

2010
2 Jul 10: Spc Morganne McBeth, U.S. Army (ruled negligent homicide, stabbed by a knife wielding soldier)
8 Mar 10: SSG Lakeshia Bailey, U.S. Army (vehicle rollover, accident)
21 Feb 10: CWO2 Billie Grinder, Tennessee Army National Guard (hard landing, family sued helicopter maker for faulty system that caused crash and settled)
10 Feb 10: Pfc Adriana Alvarez, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, outcome of investigation unknown)

2009
4 Nov 09: SSG Amy (Seyboth) Tirador, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, Army ruled suicide, family believes execution style murder, cold case)

2008
19 Oct 08: LCpl Stacy Dryden, U.S. Marine Corps (fight with fellow soldier, ruled homicide, cold case)
1 Sep 08: SSG Renee Deville, U.S. Army (injured in Iraq, died unexpectedly at Walter Reed Army Medical Center after graduating from NCO course)
14 Aug 08: Pvt Janelle King, U.S. Army (non combat related incident, outcome of investigation unknown)
2 Aug 08: Pfc Jennifer Cole, U.S. Army (gunshot wound to abdomen, ruled negligent homicide)
17 Jul 08: TSgt Jackie Larsen, U.S. Air Force (medical, natural causes)
9 May 08: Spc Mary Jaenichen, U.S. Army (non-combat related injury, outcome of investigation unknown)
22 Feb 08: Spc Keisha Morgan, U.S. Army (death ruled accidental overdose, family suspects rape and murder, cold case)
25 Jan 08: Sgt Tracy Birkman, U.S. Army (non-combat related injury, outcome of investigation unknown)

2007
20 Sep 07: Capt (Dr) Roselle Hoffmaster, U.S. Army (death ruled suicide)
7 Sep 07: Spc Marisol Heredia, U.S. Army (non-combat injuries, medical, severely burned, died in Texas from infection, outcome of investigation unknown)
16 Aug 07: Spc Kamisha J Block, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, ruled homicide, domestic violence and workplace violence)
9 Aug 07: SSG Alicia Birchett, U.S. Army (vehicle ran over her while she was changing tire, outcome of investigation unknown)
7 Feb 07: Capt Jennifer Harris, U.S. Marine Corps (helicopter crash, no sign that it involved hostile fire, outcome of investigation unknown)
28 Jan 07: Spc Carla Stewart, U.S. Army (wounds sustained when convoy vehicle rolled over)
20 Jan 07: CSM Marilyn Gabbard, Iowa Army National Guard (helicopter crash, might have been shot down, outcome of investigation unknown)

2006
12 Dec 06: Major Gloria Davis, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, death ruled suicide)
26 Nov 06: SSG Jeannette Dunn, U.S. Army (non-combat related injury, outcome of investigation unknown)
4 Sep 06: Pfc Hannah McKinney, U.S. Army (struck by vehicle, family believes rape & murder)
8 Apr 06: Lance Cpl. Juana Arellano, U.S. Marine Corps (wounds received supporting combat operations)
11 Mar 06: Pfc Amy Duerksen, U.S. Army (non-combat gunshot injury, parents share in media Amy was raped at Fort Hood prior to deployment)
1 Mar 06: Pfc Tina Priest, U.S. Army (reported rape, died of non-combat gunshot wound to the chest, cold case)
7 Jan 06: 1LT Jaime L. Campbell, Alaska Army National Guard (helicopter crash)

2005
19 Jul 05: Pfc LaVena Johnson, U.S. Army (non-combat gunshot injury, death ruled suicide, family claims rape and murder based on autopsy evidence)
4 Mar 05: Spc Adriana Salem, U.S. Army (accident, military vehicle roll over)
1 Mar 05: Spc Lizbeth Robles, U.S. Army (injuries sustained in a military vehicle accident)
16 Feb 05: Spc Katrina Bell-Johnson, U.S. Army (accident, vehicle rollover)

2004
13 Dec 04: SSG Tina Time, U.S. Army Reserve (supply truck she was driving during a dust storm collided with another military vehicle)
4 Oct 04: SSG Gina Sparks, U.S. Army (died at Fort Polk, Louisiana from injuries sustained from a non-combat gunshot wound in Iraq)
6 Jun 04: Pfc Melissa Hobart, U.S. Army (undetermined cause, died after collapsing while on guard duty)
7 Mar 04: Capt Gussie Jones, U.S. Army (non-combat related cause, outcome of investigation unknown)
14 Jan 04: SSG Keicia Hines, U.S. Army (Army reports accidentally struck by a vehicle)

2003
8 Nov 03: SSG Linda Jimenez, U.S. Army (medical, fell running to keep up with friends, died of complications at Walter Reed after a blood clot formed, caused stroke)
1 Oct 03: Spc Tamarra Ramos, U.S. Army (medical, non-combat related injuries, cancer)
15 Sep 03: Spc Alyssa Peterson, U.S. Army (gunshot wound, death ruled suicide)
9 Jul 03: SSG Melissa Valles, U.S. Army (noncombat gunshot wound to abdomen)
8 May 03: CIVILIAN Elizabeth Neuffer, Boston Globe Journalist (automobile accident)

Related Links:
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Afghanistan)
Non Combat Deaths of Female Soldiers in the US Military (Other Areas)
Noonie Fortin: Killed in Iraq or in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom
Is There an Army Cover-Up of Rape and Murder of Women Soldiers?
U.S. Military Keeping Secrets About Female Soldiers’ ‘Suicides’?
Military Policy and Legislation Considerations for the Investigations of Non Combat Death, Homicide, and Suicide of US Service Members

September: U.S. Department of Defense Casualties Report (2010)

xl_deptofdefenselogo

09/30/2010:  DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty: Mark Forester, 29, Afghanistan, Pope Air Force Base, North Carolina

09/29/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Ralph Fabbri, 20, Afghanstan, Camp Pendleton, California

09/28/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Mark Simpson, 40, and Donald Morrison, 23, Afghanistan, Fort Hood, Texas

09/27/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: William Dawson, 20, and Jaysine Petree, 19, Afghanistan, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska

09/27/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Marc Whisenant, 23, NCD, Kuwait, Florida Army National Guard

09/27/2010:  Missing WWII Naval Aviators Identified

09/27/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: John Carrillo Jr, 20, and Gebrah Noonan, 26, NCDs, Iraq, Fort Stewart, Georgia

09/27/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Clinton Springer II, 21, NCD, Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York

09/24/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Anthony Rosa, 20, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/23/2010:  Missing WWII Soldier is Identified in Germany

09/22/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Robert Baldwin, 39, Matthew Wagstaff, 34, Jonah McClellan, 26, Joshua Powell, 25, and Marvin Calhoun Jr, 23, NCDs, Afghanistan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

09/22/2010:  DOD Identifies Navy Casualty: Brendan Looney, 29, NCD, Afghanistan, West Coast Based SEAL Team

09/22/2010:  DOD Identifies Navy Casualties: David McLendon, 30, Adam Smith, 26, and Denis Miranda, 24, NCDs, East Coast Based SEAL Team

09/22/2010:  Missing WWII Soldier is Identified

09/22/2010:  DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty: Michael Buras, 23, Afghanistan, Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada

09/21/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Joshua Ose, 19, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/20/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Joshua Harton, 23, Afghanistan, Fort Drum, New York

09/20/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Paul Carron, 33, NCD, Afghanistan, Vilseck, Germany

09/20/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Barbara Vieyra, 22, Afghanistan, Fort Hood, Texas

09/20/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Timothy Johnson, 24, Afghanistan, Fort Carson, Colorado

09/20/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Ronald Grider, 30, Afghanistan, Fort Bragg, North Carolina

09/20/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Eric Yates, 26, and Jaime Newman, 27, Afghanistan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

09/20/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Scott Fleming, 24, Afghanistan, Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii

09/18/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Deangelo Snow, 22, Afghanistan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

09/17/2010:  DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty: Daniel Sanchez, 23, Afghanistan, Hurlburt Field, Florida

09/17/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Aaron Kramer, 22, Afghanistan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

09/17/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: John Burner III, 32, NCD, Iraq, Fort Bragg, North Carolina

09/16/2010:  DOD Identifies Air Force Casualty: James Hansen, 25, NCD, Iraq, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

09/16/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Ryan Hopkins, 21, NCD, Iraq, Fort Carson, Colorado

09/16/2010:  Army Releases August Suicide Data

09/10/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Todd Weaver, 26, Afghanistan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

09/09/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: John Bishop, 25, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/09/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Philip Jenkins, 26, and James McClamrock, 22, NCDs, Iraq, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii

09/09/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Jesse Balthaser, 23, Afghanistan, Twentynine Palms, California

09/08/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Philip Charte, 22, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/07/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Ross Carver, 21, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/07/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Jason McMahon, 35, Afghanistan, Fort Campbell, Kentucky

09/07/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualty: Diego Montoya, 20, Afghanistan, Fort Hood, Texas

09/03/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Vinson Adkinson III, 26, Raymond Alcaraz, 20, Matthew George, 22, and James Page, 23, Afghanistan, Bamberg, Germany

09/03/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Joshua Twigg, 21, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/02/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Mark Noziska, 24, and Casey Grochowiak, 34, Afghanistan, Fort Carson, Colorado

09/02/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Christopher Rodgers, 20, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/01/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Cody Roberts, 22, Afghanistan, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina

09/01/2010:  DOD Identifies Marine Casualty: Joseph Bovia, 24, Afghanistan, Okinawa, Japan

09/01/2010:  DOD Identifies Army Casualties: Dale Goetz, 43, Jesse Infante, 30, Kevin Kessler, 32, Matthew West, 36, and Chad Clements, 26, Afghanistan, Fort Carson, Colorado

09/01/2010:  U.S. Soldier MIA from Korean War Identified