Unusual Suspects Premiered ‘Barefoot Homicide’ on ID: Drexel University Student Deborah Wilson Found Murdered on Campus (April 5, 2015)

After an all-night study session in a university lab, math student Deborah Wilson is found strangled, missing her shoes and socks. Years later, Philadelphia investigators unearth the shocking obsession that drove a killer to take her life. -Barefoot Homicide, Unusual Suspects (S7,E13)

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $3.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict. Download the ID Go app or purchase ID True Crime Files & binge away.

Related Links:
Deborah Lynn Wilson (1963-1984) | Find A Grave
Army Reservist & Drexel University Security Guard David Dickson Murdered Deborah Wilson on Campus; Sentenced to Life in Prison (November 30, 1984)
Barefoot Homicide | Unusual Suspects | Investigation Discovery (S7,E13)
Barefoot Homicide | Unusual Suspects | Investigation Discovery (website)
Barefoot Homicide | Unusual Suspects | Investigation Discovery (Prime Video)

Ice Cold Killers Premiered ‘Frozen Carnage’ on Investigation Discovery: Army Veteran Michael Silka Went on Killing Spree in Alaska (January 8, 2013)

Manley Hot Springs, Alaska is a remote mountain hide-a-way known for simplicity and solitude. But, that innocent existence is shattered when a newcomer goes on rampage and guns down residents one by one, ultimately taking out one tenth of the town. -Frozen Carnage, Ice Cold Killers (S1,E5)

This week we focus on a heinous & horrific crime as well as the killing spree committed by a wandering “mountain man”. Get ready for scary mysteries Twisted Two’s. -Michael Silka, Scary Mysteries Podcast (July 4, 2018)

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $3.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict. Download the ID Go app or purchase ID True Crime Files & binge away.

Related Links:
Frozen Carnage | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (S1,E5)
Frozen Carnage | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (website)
Frozen Carnage | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
Twisted 2s #33 Damon & Devon Routier & Michael Silka | Scary Mysteries Podcast
Book: Murder at 40 Below: True Crime Stories from Alaska by Tom Brennan
Army Veteran Michael Silka Died After a Stand Off with Police; Silka Murdered Eight Manley Hot Springs Residents & Trooper Troy L. Duncan (May 19, 1984)
Ice Cold Killers: Five Military & Veteran Homicide Cases Featured on Investigation Discovery

Ice Cold Killers Premiered ‘Hunting Humans’ on ID: After Multiple Disappearances, Alaska Authorities on Hunt for Serial Killer (January 24, 2012)

Robert Hansen was a mild-mannered family man with a passion for hunting. A master at his trade, Hansen sought a more challenging prey – his fellow human. Hansen kidnapped women, set them loose in the Alaskan wilderness, and hunted them down for sport. -Hunting Humans, Ice Cold Killers (S1,E1)

Victims:
Andrea “Fish” Altiery (disappeared 12/2/81, unknown if body recovered)
Roxanne Easlund, 24 (disappeared 6/28/1980, unknown if body recovered)
Megan Emerick, 17 (suspected abduction on 7/7/73, body never recovered)
Angela Feddern, 24 (disappeared February 1983, body found)
DeLynn “Sugar” Frey (disappeared September 1983, body found)
Lisa “Betty” Futrell, 41 (disappeared 9/7/1980, body found)
Malai Larsen, 28 (disappeared June 1981, body found)
Paula Goulding (disappeared 4/25/83, body found)
Sue Luna, 23 (disappeared 5/16/82, body found)
Joanna Messina (disappeared 5/19/1989, body found)
Sherry Morrow, 23 (disappeared 11/17/81, body found)
Tamara Pederson, 20 (disappeared August 1982, body found)
Mary Kathleen Thill, 23 (suspected abduction on 7/5/75, body never recovered)
Cecelia “Beth” Van Zanten, 17 (suspected abduction on 12/22/71, body found)
Theresa Watson (disappeared 4/29/83, body found)
“Eklutna Annie” (real name unknown, disappeared 11/1979, body found)
Cindy Paulson (abducted & raped on 6/13/1983, escaped & survived)

List compliments of The Frozen Ground.

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $3.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict. Download the ID Go app or purchase ID True Crime Files & binge away.

Related Links:
Hunting Humans | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (S1,E1)
Hunting Humans | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (website)
Hunting Humans | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
Army Reserve Veteran Robert C. Hansen Sentenced to 461 Years Plus Life in Prison, No Parole for Murders of Multiple Women in Alaska (February 28, 1984)
Serial Killer & Army Reserve Veteran Robert C. Hansen Died of Natural Causes While Serving Out a Life Sentence in Alaska State Prison (August 21, 2014)
Ice Cold Killers: Five Military & Veteran Homicide Cases Featured on Investigation Discovery

Forensic Files Premiered ‘Strong Impressions’: What Happened on Nellis AFB TDY Didn’t Stay TDY for Air Force SSgt Ronald Gillette (August 17, 2005)

Full Episode: The wife of an Air Force officer was found dead in her bed, with a plastic laundry bag near her face. At first glance, it appeared she’d been doing laundry, fell asleep, rolled onto the bag, and suffocated. But further investigation proved that the scene had been staged. Her death wasn’t an accident; it was cold-blooded murder. -Strong Impressions, Forensic Files (S10,E11)

Editor’s Note: Full episodes of Forensic Files are available on a variety of media platforms. FilmRise Channel and Forensic Files Channel both feature full episodes of Forensic Files on YouTube. You can also find full episodes of Forensic Files on both Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. On Netflix, the seasons are grouped as collection 1-9. On Amazon Prime Video, you can find Season 1-10 here; Season 11; Season 12; Season 13; Season 14; Season 15; Season 16; Season 17; Season 18; Season 19; Season 20; and Season 21. Start bingeing and see for yourself why Forensic Files is such a hit!

Related Links:
Juana Beatriz “Vicki” Gillette (August 28, 1984)
Strong Impressions | Forensic Files | IMDb
Strong Impressions | Forensic Files | FilmRise (S10,E11)
Strong Impressions | Forensic Files | Full Episodes (YouTube)
Strong Impressions | Forensic Files | Netflix (Collection 2,E13)
Strong Impressions | Forensic Files | Amazon Prime Video (S10,E3)
Forensic Files: 10 Active Duty Military and Veteran Homicide Cases [Full Episodes]
Forensic Files – Season 10, ep 11 – Strong impressions | Readable
Ron Gillette: An Air Force Man Who Didn’t Exactly Aim High
10 Great ‘Forensic Files’ Episodes and How to Find Them on Netflix
10 Unlikely Pieces of Evidence That Convicted Murderers
United States Air Force v. Staff Sergeant Ronald P. GILLETTE (1986)

Army Reservist & Drexel University Security Guard David Dickson Murdered Deborah Wilson on Campus; Sentenced to Life in Prison (November 30, 1984)

Deborah Wilson

Deborah Wilson, Pennsylvania

On November 30, 1984, student Deborah Wilson was found strangled to death in a stairwell outside a computer lab at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. There was no sign of rape and her purse wasn’t taken but her socks and shoes were missing. For eight years Philadelphia police detectives were stumped because no circumstantial or forensic evidence matched any of the prime suspects including a campus security guard who had done a stint in prison for robbery. The convicted felon conveniently left that important detail off his university employment application but apparently the university didn’t do a background check. Eight years later, Philadelphia cold case investigators began looking at the case. They reinterviewed campus employees and recognized a discrepancy in testimony. In the first homicide investigation, campus security guard David Dickson told detectives that he heard the printer working in the computer lab at 1:30 a.m. so he decided not to disturb the busy student. When he came back a couple hours later, she was gone. But in the second investigation they learned from a university employee that the printers stop working at 10 p.m.

Detectives zeroed in on Sgt. David Dickson, who was a Army Reserves Sergeant heading up a recruiting station. According to investigators, Dickson left his campus security guard position shortly after the crime and entered the active duty Army again. When they dug into his military record, they learned that his first active duty stint ended with a courts martial and a discharge from the Army in 1979 for burglary. He was accused of breaking into a female Army soldier’s home in Korea and stealing her sneakers. He was also suspected of a string of shoe thefts at the Philadelphia Naval Base where he lived. Multiple spouses reported that their white sneakers and gym socks where stolen from their homes but it was revealed that military leadership disregarded them. Apparently, the military thought the spouses were ‘crazy’ and ‘acting up’ while their husbands were away. In addition, a local newspaper noted that Dickson was fired from a pharmaceutical company for sending a co-worker a sexually explicit letter and whispering over the phone that he was going to rape her.

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David Dickson, U.S. Army Reserve

When police searched Dickson’s home, they found multiple videotapes containing ‘foot pornography’ and more then twenty pairs of individually wrapped white sneakers in a storage unit. Cold case investigators theorized that Deborah Wilson stayed late in a computer room in Randell Hall to work on a project due the next day. Dickson worked the midnight to 8 a.m. shift at Randell Hall. One of the outgoing security guards asked Dickson to escort Deborah to her car but instead Dickson’s ego was bruised and he decided that he was going to take Deborah’s sneakers. He used a few karate chops on her head and neck area, lunged at her, and then hit her on the forehead with a security clock. After he realized what he did, he decided he had to kill her to cover up his actions so he strangled her to death, dragged her body to the stairwell, and took her socks and sneakers. In September 1993, Dickson was arrested for killing Deborah Wilson but he remained stubbornly silent. Dickson’s first trial ended in a deadlocked hung jury but the second trial’s outcome would be the result of Dickson’s own actions. Dickson proclaimed his innocence throughout the entire first trial but prosecutors learned from a snitch that he bragged about killing the ‘rich bitch’ while he was in jail. The investigators also learned more about the details of the crime and the information provided corroborated the evidence found at the autopsy including the bruises on her feet.

David Dickson was found guilty of second degree murder in December 1995 and was sentenced to life in prison. A psychiatrist testified that Dickson’s obsession with white sneakers ‘crossed a sick sociopathic line.’ It’s important to note that Dickson’s criminal behavior is what prompted him to move between the active duty Army and the Army Reserves. Dickson was able to escape each location without detection but the behavior followed him from base to base. This case is an excellent argument for the use of the FBI national database in the use of documenting crime in the U.S. military that can be easily accessed by military law enforcement officials in the world. Burglary is considered a felony therefore it would be an appropriate action to enter the crime into the world wide system whether you know who did it or not. The FBI national database would help us track the clues to solve the crimes perpetrated by transient military personnel.

Investigation Discovery:

After an all-night study session in a university lab, math student Deborah Wilson is found strangled, missing her shoes and socks. Years later, Philadelphia investigators unearth the shocking obsession that drove a killer to take her life. -Barefoot Homicide, Unusual Suspects (S7,E13)

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $3.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict. Download the ID Go app or purchase ID True Crime Files & binge away.

Related Links:
Find a Grave: Deborah Lynn Wilson (1963-1984)
Fetish Murder? Killed By Foot Fetishist? Drexel Student Was Slain In ’84
Slowly Making A Case A Lengthy Hearing On 1984 Homicide
Witness: Suspect Told Of Killing Skill
Murder Suspect’s Wife Tells Court Of His Sexual Fascination With Feet
Love Letter, Sneaker Fetish Linked At Murder Hearing
Accused Coed-killer Tries To Hang Self In Jail
Woman Who Lived Above Murder Suspect Tells Of Shoe Thefts 
’84 Drexel Security Called Lax By Witness Slaying Trial Told Guards Drunk, Stoned
Inmate: He Killed Her, Then Played With Her Feet Claims Shoe Fetishist Told Story In Prison
Defense Lawyer: Foot Fetish Doesn’t Make Him A Killer
Self-confessed shoe fetishist retried in student’s murder
Cold Case Squad: Modern-Day ‘Sherlock Holmes’ Team Takes on Oregon Slaying
Snitch Work: Death Penalty Information Center
Unusual Suspects Premiered ‘Barefoot Homicide’ on ID: Drexel University Student Deborah Wilson Found Murdered on Campus (April 5, 2015)
Barefoot Homicide | Unusual Suspects | Investigation Discovery (S7,E13)
Barefoot Homicide | Unusual Suspects | Investigation Discovery (website)
Barefoot Homicide | Unusual Suspects | Investigation Discovery (Prime Video)

Army Veteran Michael Silka Died After a Stand Off with Police; Silka Murdered Eight Manley Hot Springs Residents & Trooper Troy L. Duncan (May 19, 1984)

Michael Alan Silka

Michael Alan Silka, U.S. Army Veteran

Manley Hotsprings, Alaska is in the middle of nowhere and at the end of the road. In 1984, Manley had a population of maybe 50. Fairbanks was the closest city and roughly a five hour drive or 150 miles away. In the spring of 1984, the residents of Manley were anxiously awaiting for spring. When the rivers start flowing, transportation on the river became available and that’s important to the Manley Springs community. On May 17, 1984, Vietnam veteran Larry Joe McVey, 37, and Dale Madajski, 24, went to the boat landing about a quarter mile out of town. Later that afternoon when the men failed to return, the wives began to wonder what was keeping them. They drove to the landing and found Joe’s boat still on the trailer. They knew something was wrong because the pair left their beer in the truck. One of the wives also noticed another local’s car at the landing. Albert Hagen Jr., 27, was visiting his parents in Manley and went to the river that morning after he cleared out some brush from their land. Given the unusually warm weather, maybe the three of them went somewhere together…

But by noon the next day, there was no sign of the three men. That afternoon friends and family of the missing gathered together out of concern. They were terrified something horrible happened to their loved ones. They realized others in Manley had vanished too. The families were worried about the Kleins because no one had heard from them. They were last seen riding their four wheeler to the landing. Their four-wheeler was parked at the landing but they were not there. Community members assumed they went to their property up river. The family left town on occasion but always asked someone to take care of their dog while they were gone. Frantic, several of the towns people went to the Kleins to check in on them, and they found the dog. They knocked on their door and nobody answered. Meanwhile, others headed to the boat launch in hopes the missing had returned. And while there, they noticed an unattended vehicle, that of a stranger who had arrived in Manley Springs only a few days earlier.

The stranger had been in town for a few days so everyone got used to him; he set up camp at the landing. It wasn’t unusual to see him at the landing or in town. But the newcomer was among the many who were missing. Six people were missing, nearly 1/10 of the town was unaccounted for, and the alarm bells were going off. Meanwhile, folks in Manley had no idea what happened down river in the tiny town of Hopkinsville. Roger Culp had called the place home for years but no one had seen or heard from Roger in more than a week. Roger’s neighbor also noticed their moose hide was missing from the line at her cabin. She was immediately suspicious that Michael Silka had taken it. She went to his cabin to confront him. While she was there, she noticed a funny mound of snow at his place. She found another mound of fresh snow behind the cabin too. Silka was nowhere to be found. She questioned neighbors about his whereabouts but nobody saw him. The neighbor left and returned to the cabin again and this time she saw blood.

The neighbor ran back to her cabin to get her husband because she knew something was wrong. When they arrived at Silka’s cabin, their first thought was he probably killed an animal but they were uneasy about why he would hide it. They took another look in Michael’s cabin; this time he answered the door. He said he took the moose hide with the understanding that they gave it to him and he said he would return it. Later that day, authorities checked out Silka’s cabin but there was no response. They found blood and fresh mounds of snow too, When they investigated the mounds, they found the moose hide. They knocked on Silka’s door once more and this time he answered; he had been there all along. Silka said he shot a moose and the hide dripped blood. The police didn’t find anything suspicious and assumed the case was closed and left. It was not uncommon for people to go missing in Alaska but this many missing in one little Alaska town was alarming. Six people disappeared in Manley and residents were going to look for them.

They found Michael Silka’s vehicle at the landing and turned his license number over to police; they thought he was suspect. The police learned Silka, 25, was the same man who raised eyebrows in nearby Hopkinsville. In Hopkinsville, Roger Culp was missing. Police searched the community after a resident saw blood in the snow. A week later, another resident told the police about a scary incident they had with Michael Silka. Roger and Michael had words and Roger followed Silka back to his cabin, then the resident heard gun shots. There was no 911 where she lived so she locked herself in her cabin. Armed with the new information, police wanted to talk to Michael Silka again. When the police arrived at his cabin, he was gone and his car was gone. The police spent two days combing the area around Silka’s cabin and found patches of blood. A lab confirmed it was human blood. The police didn’t have a body but they wanted to speak with Silka. They were going to start with a conversation with him about the missing Roger Culp.

Map of Alaska

State of Alaska Map

The community suspected Michael Silka had evil intentions and it was going to be hours before a team of Alaska State Troopers would show up. In the early morning hours of May 19, 1984, Alaska State Troopers arrive at Manley by helicopter and auto. The troopers set up a roadblock at the only road that left town. When the helicopter took off and landed, it stirred up the snow and pools of blood began to emerge. They also found some 44 caliber shells. They knew this was the crime scene. Near the river bank troopers found the Klein’s four wheeler hidden in the brush and Joe’s hat. They also found drag marks to the water’s edge. At this point, they don’t know if the missing are dead or if Silka was holding them hostage. They took to the sky and ground to search for Silka. Shortly after they started searching, the troopers unexpectedly stumbled upon a woman at the river’s edge waving for help. She told them her husband had gone to town and didn’t return home; she last saw her husband Fred Burk, 27, two days ago.

Over a dozen Alaska State Troopers armed with weapons and combat gear converged on Manley Hot Springs. But they had no idea the suspected killer they were seeking was a former military man. After running his plates, they learned Michael Silka joined the Army after he graduated from high school in Illinois. He did a tour of duty at Fort Wainwright in Fairbanks. Before making his way to Manley, he spent a few months holed up in a remote Canadian town. He lived in a hotel room, used cash for everything, and stayed to himself. People noticed he carried a number of shotguns in his vehicle. Silka had minor criminal offenses for fire arms in his past. He loved fire arms but came from a place guns were frowned upon. His dream was to move to Manley Hot Springs to live off the land. The troopers learned he had trouble with law enforcement all the way from Illinois, to Canada, and in Alaska. As troopers set out to find Michael Silka, they were keenly aware they were up against a dangerous set of circumstances. They were dealing with a dangerous suspect who used the brush as cover.

The troopers scour the area and suddenly the pilot spotted a man in a flat bottom boat towing a canoe. The pilot recognized Michael Silka. He also observed an arsenal of weapons in the boat. Armed with M-16s, the troopers orchestrated a plan. They used two helicopters to keep him surrounded but Silka got out of the boat on the edge of the river bank. He immediately picked up a weapon and began shooting at the troopers. Silka had the upper hand so the helicopter pulled back. He shot at the helicopter quite a few times and positioned himself for a gun battle. The troopers were not going to act unless acted upon. But Silka strategically positioned himself by taking cover in the thick brush as he shot at the helicopter again. As the helicopter was backing away, they realized they had been hit and that Trooper Troy Duncan, 34, was shot. Seconds later, another trooper started shooting back with a M-16 in fully auto. Silka was hit five times and died instantly. They then turned their attention to their comrade but he was already gone.

Trooper Duncan was the fourth trooper to die in the line of duty in Alaska. In the days after the carnage, the residents set out to find the missing. Divers attempted to look in the river but the silt pulled them down to the bottom. It was impossible to find them if they were in the river. Investigators contended that Silka got in an argument with Joe and Dale down at the boat dock and the argument most likely led to Silka using his gun to settle the score. He lost his temper and shot them. The other residents showed up when he was dragging the bodies to the river. He had to keep killing people to get rid of the evidence. Fred Burk had the unfortunate experience of running into Silka too. Michael shot him so he could take his boat. Thankfully by the end of the summer, the river had given up the bodies of Joe, Dale, Lyman Klein, 31, and Fred Burk. All of them had been shot in the head. Lyman’s pregnant wife Joyce and their son Marshall were never found and the bodies of Albert Hagan Jr. and Roger Culp never surfaced either.

The total number of Silka’s victims may never be known. In the days before Silka was making his way to Manley, Fred Burk and his mother-in-law saw the drifter’s vehicle parked some 30 miles outside of town. They noticed three people in the front seat, one they later identified as Silka. They observed that the two people with him look petrified. To this day, no one knows what happened to those two people or who they were. At the request of his father, Michael Silka was buried in the National Cemetery in Sitka, Alaska. He was an honorably discharged soldier and had that right. But what’s even more ironic about that is the State Trooper Training Academy is right next door to the cemetery. A retired Alaska State Trooper said they had to unmark the grave for whatever reason.

Source: Frozen Carnage, Ice Cold Killers, Investigation Discovery

Podcast:

This week we focus on a heinous & horrific crime as well as the killing spree committed by a wandering “mountain man”. Get ready for scary mysteries Twisted Two’s. -Michael Silka, Scary Mysteries Podcast (July 4, 2018)

Investigation Discovery:

Manley Hot Springs, Alaska is a remote mountain hide-a-way known for simplicity and solitude. But, that innocent existence is shattered when a newcomer goes on rampage and guns down residents one by one, ultimately taking out one tenth of the town. -Frozen Carnage, Ice Cold Killers (S1,E5)

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $3.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict. Download the ID Go app or purchase ID True Crime Files & binge away.

Related Links:
Obituary: Michael Alan Silka (1968-1984)
Murderpedia: Michael Alan Silka
Manley Victim is Found
Mass murder in Alaska: Suspect, 9 others dead
Massacre: Slain drifter believed mass murderer in Alaskan town
Alaska town is still haunted by the horror of mass murder
Memories of Springtime Murders Chill Small Alaskan Town
Violent crime in Alaska:Are loners and outcasts drawn to America’s frontier?
At Road’s End, There’s No One Left to Flee From
Michael Alan Silka and the Firefight at Manley
Gunfights on Guns.com: Wilderness Manhunts
The Tiny Town In Alaska With A Terribly Creepy Past
Murder in Alaska: Crazy in the ’80’s
Murders at Manley Hot Springs
Today in Horror History: Michael Alan Silka (May 19, 1984)
10 Ice Cold Killers From Alaska That Will Make You Fear The Last Frontier
Here’s a look at rampage killings that have occurred in the United States since the 1940s
Here’s a look at rampage killings that have occurred in the United States since the 1940s 2
By the numbers: America’s deadliest mass shootings | CBS News
Man killed by police after killing spree
Yours in Murder: Michael Silka | Apple Podcasts
10 Small Towns Devastated By Sudden Killing Sprees
5 Devastating Small Town Crimes
Becoming a Practical Rifleman
Murders In The United States: Crimes, Killers And Victims Of The Twentieth Century
Manley Hot Springs Rampage: Michael Alan Silka killed at least 9 people in a three hour rampage
A history of Alaska State Troopers’ line-of-duty deaths
Trooper Troy Lynn Duncan | Officer Down Memorial Page
Frozen Carnage | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (S1,E5)
Frozen Carnage | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (website)
Frozen Carnage | Ice Cold Killers | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
Twisted 2s #33 Damon & Devon Routier & Michael Silka | Scary Mysteries Podcast
Book: Murder at 40 Below: True Crime Stories from Alaska by Tom Brennan
Ice Cold Killers Premiered ‘Frozen Carnage’ on Investigation Discovery: Army Veteran Michael Silka Went on Killing Spree in Alaska (January 8, 2013)