Who Killed Jane Doe? Premiered ‘The Tent Girl’ on Investigation Discovery: Barbara ‘Bobbie’ Hackmann & George ‘Earl’ Taylor (January 23, 2018)


A woman’s body is found in a tent bag in the Kentucky woods. A thousand miles away, a family searches for a missing mother of three. Both cases go unsolved for decades, until a man’s obsession and a family’s determination converge, uncovering the truth. -Who Killed Jane Doe?, Investigation Discovery

Who Killed Jane Doe? featured the story of ‘The Tent Girl’ on Investigation Discovery in January 2018. On May 17, 1968, a man walking in the woods in Georgetown, Kentucky discovered a body wrapped in a tent. He reported the finding to authorities who determined that the body was that of a female she didn’t have a nam. This Jane Doe was dubbed ‘The Tent Girl’ in the media because the authorities attempted to find out who she was. She had been murdered and they wanted to find her family. The Tent Girl was buried in a local cemetery in an attempt to honor this girl who didn’t have a name. ‘Who Killed Jane Doe?’ began the episode by explaining that in the early sixties, Barbara Ann ‘Bobbie’ Hackmann of Lexington, Kentucky met George ‘Earl’ Taylor when she was a teenager. He was a single father from Florida who claimed his wife left him to be with another man and he needed a babysitter. Bobbie babysat Earl’s daughter Bonnie while he worked for the Carnival.

Although Earl Taylor was five years older than Bobbie Hackmann, the pair fell in love and decided to get married. Because Earl worked for the Carnival, they moved constantly but in 1964 they settled for an apartment in Miami, Florida. Bobbie and Earl had children of their own and Bobbie’s sister moved to Florida to be closer to her. Then one day, Bobbie told her sister she needed to leave town quickly and asked her for some money. Bobbie told her sister the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigation) was in town and they were looking for Earl because he went Absent without Leave (AWOL) from the military; Earl did not want to go back in. She told her sister they were moving to Texas. Nobody ever heard from Bobbie Taylor again. When Bobbie’s sister finally caught up with Earl, Bobbie wasn’t with him and he told her that she ran off with another man. Once again Earl’s significant other left their children and ran off with another man. Earl would not tell Bobbie’s sister where Bobbie’s kids were. Bobbie’s family filed an official missing person’s report.

Todd Matthews and Bobbie’s family were both obsessed with finding the same person but they didn’t know it. Todd was looking for the identity of a Jane Doe dubbed ‘The Tent Girl’ and Bobbie’s family was obsessed with finding their missing family member Bobbie Taylor. With the invent of the internet, it helped both Bobbie’s family and Todd Matthews get in touch with one another to compare notes. Todd e-mailed Bobbie’s family to tell them about ‘The Tent Girl’ because he believed the Jane Doe in Kentucky was the missing girl Bobbie Hackmann Taylor. Bobbie’s family contacted the police in Kentucky to find out if their Jane Doe was Bobbie. The authorities found enough similarities between the composite drawing and the real photos that they exhumed The Tent Girl’s remains. After DNA testing, The Tent Girl was indeed a match to Barbara Hackmann. The family finally found their missing Bobbie. Bobbie’s children were relieved to know their mother didn’t walk away from them but devastated that she was found and had been murdered.

Earl’s daughter Bonnie described a night on December 6, 1967 where she was awakened by a struggle in Bobbie and Earl’s bedroom. But, she didn’t want to get in trouble so she fell back asleep. When seven year old Bonnie woke up in the morning, Bobbie was gone. The family suspects that Earl murdered Bobbie and then disposed of her body in the woods. He most likely used tents from the Carnivals he worked at to wrap her body. When Bonnie asked Earl where Bobbie was, she never got an answer from him. When Bonnie returned home from school that same day, Earl had packed up the car and informed the children they were moving. When Bonnie asked about Bobbie again, Earl said “she’ll catch up with us later.” Bonnie said this was the last time she saw or heard from Bobbie. When Bobbie was finally identified via DNA in 1998, authorities couldn’t question Earl because he died of cancer 10 years earlier. Bobbie’s family decided to leave Bobbie in the same plot because she had been part of that community for over thirty years. They cared about ‘The Tent Girl’ and the case is still an open investigation.

Editor’s note: With a cable subscription, you can download the free ID Go app and watch all of the Investigation Discovery programming at your convenience. And for those who do not have cable, you can watch “unlocked” episodes on the ID Go app including the latest premieres. Download the ID Go app and binge away. For those who prefer commercial free programming during your binge session, Prime Video has an ID channel: ‘True Crime Files by Investigation Discovery” available for $2.99 a month. It’s a compilation of older seasons but totally worth the cost if you are a true crime addict.


The Tent Girl


Tent Girl | 18 News


The Eerie Case Of Barbara Ann Hackmann Taylor (Jane Doe Identified After 30 Years) -CreepyNews


TENT GIRL documentary

Related Links:
Barbara Ann “Tent Girl” Hackmann
The Story of Tent Girl | CBS News
‘Tent girl’ homicide victim identified through DNA test
Doe Network Works Worldwide to Solve Missing Persons Cases
Web Helps ID John and Jane Does | WIRED
Doe Network Searches for Missing Persons
‘Tent Girl’ and the start of the Doe Network
Tent Girl: Monster, mystery, mother?
Amateurs solve mysteries of the unnamed dead
‘Doe Network’ restores names to the missing dead
Warm hearts, Cold cases | Daily Democrat News
Long Time Gone: Modern tools, hope for old cases
‘Information detective’ tries to restore names to the missing
Todd Matthews of The DOE Network & NamUs.Gov
It all started with the “Tent Girl” – Todd Matthew’s Story
Accent: unsolved cases-unexplained deaths
‘Tent Girl’ 2 sketches and actual photograph after she was ID’d
Full Disclosure: Database solves cold-case mysteries
“The Skeleton Crew”: How a motley band of amateurs solves cold cases online
Solving the Unsolved: True Crime 2014
Identifying the nameless | The Republic
Solving ‘Tent Girl’ Case, Factory Worker Turns Missing Persons Expert
Volunteers are solving the tragic puzzle of the missing and dead
Left for dead: How America fails the missing and unidentified
NAMUS: A tool everyone should use | Missing Persons of America
Murder Mystery: Lives Lost & Found
10 Victims Who Went Unidentified for Years
A Body in Kentucky: The 30-Year-Long Mystery of “Tent Girl”
Bones, teeth recovered in exhumation. Will they lead to identity?
One Man’s Obsessive Quest to Identify a 96-Year-Old Dead Body
Who Are You? NamUs helps law enforcement identify the unidentifiable
‘Tent Girl’ to be focus of TV documentary in February
‘Tent Girl’ documentary to air Tuesday
Investigation Discovery To Feature Kentucky ‘Tent Girl’ Case
Story of Tent Girl Barbara ‘Bobbie’ Ann Taylor spotlighted on ID
Naming the Nameless: The Internet Tries to Identify John and Jane Does
Podcast 55: Barfly & Tent Girl | The Little Podcast of Horrors
The 30-Year-Long Mystery of “Tent Girl”

Books:
Someone’s Daughter: In Search of Justice for Jane Doe By Silvia Pettem
The Skeleton Crew: How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America’s Coldest Cases By Deborah Halber

Video Links:
The Tent Girl
Tent Girl | 18 News
The Eerie Case Of Barbara Ann Hackmann Taylor (Jane Doe Identified After 30 Years)
Who Killed Jane Doe #204 – ” The Tent Girl” (Vimeo)
Who Killed Jane Doe? | Investigation Discovery (Amazon)
Who Killed Jane Doe? | Investigation Discovery
About the Show | Who Killed Jane Doe? | Investigation Discovery
The Tent Girl | Who Killed Jane Doe? | Investigation Discovery (website)
The Tent Girl | Who Killed Jane Doe? | Investigation Discovery (YouTube)

Green Beret Doctor Capt. Howard Levy Convicted in Court-martial for Willfully Disobeying Orders & Making Disloyal Statements About U.S. Policy in Vietnam (June 2, 1967)

History-channel-logo-1

“Capt. Howard Levy, 30, a dermatologist from Brooklyn, is convicted by a general court-martial in Fort Jackson, South Carolina, of willfully disobeying orders and making disloyal statements about U.S. policy in Vietnam. Levy had refused to provide elementary instruction in skin disease to Green Beret medics on the grounds that the Green Berets would use medicine as ‘another tool of political persuasion’ in Vietnam.” Read more from This Day in History here.

Related Links:
1967 Press Photo Howard Levy
Captain Howard Levy
My Visit With Capt. Howard Levy
ACLU History: The Military
GI opposition to the Vietnam War, 1965-1973
Timeline of the G.I. Antiwar Movement
Parker v. Levy (1974)
Vietnam War | National Archives
Green Berets End Testimony in Levy Case
The Press of Peace
The Trial of Captain Levy: II
Court Rejects Cases Challenging Legality of the War
A system of law, tried and found guilty
Vietnam: Where Are They Now?
Following Up | The New York Times
The Real Story of Vietnam Veterans Against the War
Sir! No Sir! | Seattle Weekly
How GI Resistance Altered The Course Of History: “Sir, No Sir,” A Timely Film
Watada, the War and the Law | The Nation
Super Troopers | Village Voice
Back to ‘nam: Cinema looks at the USA’s other hated war
Fonda’s antiwar years are being lived anew
New life for anti-war film Pentagon suppressed
Civil rights-era lawyer for Bond, Ali dies in Fla.
Charles Morgan Jr., 78; was famed civil rights era lawyer
A Memorial Day Remembrance of Peace Activist Soldiers
Please Don’t Thank Me For My Service
The GI Revolt That Ended the Vietnam War
Attica hostages died of gunshots, not cut throats as originally reported in 1971
NY Times Belated obituary for ex-Green Beret, antiwar activist Donald Duncan
Vietnam and the Soldiers’ Revolt
Opinion: Honoring GIs and veterans who fought for peace in Vietnam
I’m Pretty Sure Sergeant Greenwald Tried To Kill Me.
The Look Magazine article from 1968
Vietnam Vets Return to My Lai, Where US Slaughtered 500 Civilians
The Vietnam War and the US Soldiers’ Revolt
Reflections on the Anti-War Documentary, Sir! No Sir!
Dr. Howard Levy Refuses Orders Over Vietnam War; Charges U.S. War Crimes
War Crimes and Vietnam: The “Nuremberg Defense” and the Military Service Resister
Vietnam War on Trial: The Court-Martial of Dr. Howard B. Levy
May 10, 1967: Army Captain Howard Levy Refuses to Train Green Berets During Vietnam War
The Court-Martial of Captain Levy: Medical Ethics vs. Military Law
Book: Sir! No Sir! – The Suppressed Story of the GI Movement to End the War in Vietnam
Movie of the Month: Sir! No Sir! | Portland Public Library
Movie: Sir! No Sir! | The New Yorker